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AMD and Dell Leaders to Be Keynote Speakers at WCIT 2006

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Hardware

"The World Congress on Information Technology (WCIT 2006) today announced the addition of Michael Dell, Chairman of the Board, Dell Inc.; and Hector Ruiz, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO, AMD; as keynote speakers. The two leaders will draw on their longstanding involvement in a variety of global causes to share their insight on the positive role technology can play in addressing societal needs."

"It is vital to the mission of WCIT 2006 that we involve the best and brightest minds," said J. Nixon (Nick) Fox III, Chairman, WCIT 2006. "We are proud to add Mr. Dell and Dr. Ruiz to our program and we pledge that there is much more to come."

The WCIT 2006 will be held in Austin, Texas from Monday, May 1 through Friday, May 5, 2006. Approximately 2,000 delegates from more than 75 countries are expected to attend.

Full Story.

In a not too related story, LinuxHardware is running a shootout between the 64-bit offerings from these two companies. Interesting.

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