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Q4OS 4 Is Finally Here and Brings the Trinity Desktop Environment to Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye”

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Linux

Q4OS is the distribution you probably know for shipping with the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE). Not many distros use Trinity DE these days, but Q4OS’ goal is to turn as many Windows users into Linux users.

The latest release, Q4OS 4.6 is here after more than a year of development, based on the Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye” operating system series and featuring the latest Trinity Desktop Environment 14.0.10 release, as well as the KDE Plasma 5.20 desktop environment, as separate editions.

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Q4OS 4.6 Release Coverage and Original

  • Q4OS 4.6 Release Based on Debian 11 Bullseye - itsfoss.net

    Q4OS is a lightweight, Debian-based distribution featuring the KDE Plasma and Trinity desktops. The project’s latest version is Q4OS 4.6 which is based on Debian 11 “Bullseye”. One of the project’s aims is to allow both desktops to be installed alongside each other, a rare feature given the shared history of the two desktops.

    “Q4OS Gemini is based on Debian Bullseye 11 and Plasma 5.20, optionally Trinity 14.0.10 desktop environment, and it’s available for 64bit/x64 and 32bit/i686pae computers, as well as for older i386 systems without PAE extension. We are working hard to bring it for ARM devices as well. Desktop profiler, an exclusive Q4OS tool, has custom profiles support now, so a user can export the current desktop status snapshot, modify it and even create customized profiles on his own. Any profile is importable, so a user can import and apply it later on another hardware, getting a unique possibility of easy installation and configuration of the pre-defined set of applications and packages at once. In other words, a user easily gets a fresh operating system installation configured and ready to work with a minimal post installation effort. In addition, each desktop environment may keep its own applications profiles.” Additional information can be found in the project’s release announcement.

  • Q4OS - desktop operating system

    A brand new stable Q4OS 4.6 version, codenamed 'Gemini' is immediately available for download and use in productive environments. This is a long-term support LTS release, to be supported for at least five years with security patches and software updates. Apart from numerous significant improvements and fixes, Q4OS Gemini enhances hardware support, making the operating system more stable and reliable.

    Q4OS Gemini is based on Debian Bullseye 11 and Plasma 5.20, optionally Trinity 14.0.10 desktop environment, and it's available for 64bit/x64 and 32bit/i686pae computers, as well as for older i386 systems without PAE extension. We are working hard to bring it for ARM devices as well.

    Desktop profiler, an exclusive Q4OS tool, has custom profiles support now, so a user can export the current desktop status snapshot, modify it and even create customized profiles on his own. Any profile is importable, so a user can import and apply it later on another hardware, getting a unique possibility of easy installation and configuration of the pre-defined set of applications and packages at once. In other words, a user easily gets a fresh operating system installation configured and ready to work with a minimal post installation effort. In addition, each desktop environment may keep its own applications profiles.

Q4OS 4.6 Gemini Released Based on Debian 11 Bullseye

  • Q4OS 4.6 Gemini Released Based on Debian 11 Bullseye

    Q4OS 4.6 is code-named Gemini and is based on Debian GNU / Linux 11. The version of the distribution that is now available is an LTS release that will be updated for at least 5 years.

    As a desktop environment, either Plasma 5.20 or the Trinity Desktop from KDE 3 in version 14.0.10 can be used. The lightweight Trinity desktop in particular is very popular with the community, as it can be operated smoothly even on older hardware. This also explains that the distribution is not only available for 64bit / x64 and 32bit / i686pae computers, but a variant for older i386 systems without PAE extension is also available.

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