Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Open Hardware/Modding Projects

Filed under
Development
Hardware
  • ANAVI Gardening uHAT adds soil and other sensors to Raspberry Pi (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    We’ve been covering and reviewing ANAVI open-source hardware boards for several years now, either standalone boards based on ESP8266, or add-on boards for Raspberry Pi.

    The ANAVI Gardening uHAT is the latest board from Leon Anavi. It is a micro HAT designed for Raspberry Pi Zero to Raspberry Pi 4 SBCs that offers interfaces for soil sensors and other environmental sensors allowing measurements of soil moisture, atmospheric pressure and humidity, temperature with a waterproof sensor, and light intensity for gardening applications.

  • ZB-GW03 ESP32-based Ethernet Zigbee gateway works with Tasmota firmware - CNX Software

    ZB-GW03 is an Ethernet Zigbee Gateway compatible with eWelink mobile app and with a design similar to SONOFF ZBBridge gateway but replacing ESP8266 SoC by ESP32 SoC, and adding an Ethernet port.

    The ZB-GW03 gateway is apparently based on the same Silicon Labs EFR32MG21 Zigbee Arm Cortex-M33 chip and has been hacked to run Tasmota open-source software for people preferring more flexibility and/or integration with OpenHAB or Home Assistant open-source home automation frameworks via Zigbee2MQTT.

  • Arduino Orchestra Plays The Planets Suite | Hackaday

    We’ve seen a great many Arduino synthesizer projects over the years. We love to see a single Arduino bleeping out some monophonic notes. From there, many hackers catch the bug and the sky is truly the limit. [Kevin] is one such hacker who now has an Arduino orchestra capable of playing all seven movements of Gustav Holst’s Planets Suite.

    The performers are not human beings with expensive instruments, but simple microcontrollers running code hewn by [Kevin’s] own fingertips. The full orchestra consists of 11 Arduino Nanos, 6 Arduino Unos, 1 Arduino Pro Mini, 1 Adafruit Feather 32u4, and finally, a Raspberry Pi.

  • 3D Printed Research Robotics Platform Runs Remotely | Hackaday

    By patching Ubuntu Linux, and enabling preemptive multitasking for real-time scheduling, as well as carefully selecting Wi-Fi drivers, it was possible to get raw packets out to robot in about 1 ms, enabling control loop bandwidths of around 1 Khz. And, that, was fast enough to run at least sixteen motors in parallel.

  • Automated Window Blinds Using MQTT And Home Assistant | Hackaday

    Finnish software engineer [Toni] is on a quest to modernize his 1991 house, and his latest project was to automate the window blinds and control them using Home Assistant. Unless your blinds have built-in motors, most of the effort of such a project centers around how to integrate and attach the motor — and as [Toni] points out, there are tons of different blinds with all kinds of operating mechanisms. But once you solve that issue, half the battle is over.

    These particular blinds require less than one turn of the control rod to go from fully open to fully closed, and [Toni] selects a 270-degree range-of-motion, 20 kg*cm torque servo motor to drive them. He really wanted to install the motor inside the window, but it just wouldn’t fit. Instead, each servo motor is mounted in a custom 3D-printed case installed on the window frame just below the operating rod. An ESP8266-based controller box is installed above the window, hidden behind curtains, and operates all three servos.

More in Tux Machines

Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Apple Final Cut Pro

In 2020, Apple began the Apple silicon transition, using self-designed, 64-bit ARM-based Apple M1 processors on new Mac computers. Maybe it’s the perfect time to move away from the proprietary world of Apple, and embrace the open source Linux scene. Final Cut Pro is a commercial proprietary video editing application which lets users log and transfer video, edit, process the video, and output to a wide variety of formats. What are the best free and open source alternatives? Read more

Open source photo processing with Darktable

It's hard to say how good photographs happen. You have to be in the right place at just the right moment. You have to have a camera at the ready and an eye for composition. And that's just the part that happens in the camera. There's a whole other stage to great photography that many people don't think about. It used to happen with lights and chemicals in a darkroom, but with today's digital tools, post-production happens in darkroom software. One of the best photo processors is Darktable, and I wrote an intro to Darktable article back in 2016. It's been five years since that article, so I thought I'd revisit the application to write about one of its advanced features: masks. Darktable hasn't changed much since I originally wrote about it, which to my mind, is one of the hallmarks of a truly great application. A consistent interface and continued great performance is all one can ask of software, and Darktable remains familiar and powerful. If you're new to Darktable, read my introductory article to learn the basics. Read more

What's the Difference Between Git Switch and Checkout?

When you start learning and using Git, you'll come across the common situation where you have to change branches. And here, things could become a bit confusing for you. If you look for how to switch branches in git, you'll come across some examples where git switch is used and some examples where git checkout is used. So, what's the difference between git switch and git checkout? If both can be used for switching branches, why are there two commands for the same purpose? Let me explain. Read more

Android Leftovers