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Kernel: Raspberry Pi, Intel/x86, and Asahi Linux (M1)

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  • Raspberry Pi "V3D" Driver Landing Support For Multiple Sync Objects - Phoronix

    A new batch of drm-misc-next updates were sent out today for staging in DRM-Next ahead of the Linux 5.16 merge window. With this week's changes there is a notable addition for the Broadcom V3D DRM kernel driver, which most notably is for the Raspberry Pi 4 and newer.

  • Linux 5.16 Preps More Display Code For Alder Lake P & DG2/Alchemist - Phoronix

    In Linux 5.14 Intel introduced initial Alder Lake P enablement driver support including around the new "XeLPD" display block. With Linux 5.15 there was the initial enablement around DG2/Alchemist graphics. Now for Linux 5.16 is a significant amount of new driver code for actually getting the display support into shape for both DG2 and ADL-P.

  • Progress Report: September 2021 - Asahi Linux

    It’s been a busy month! We’ve had a lot of movement in kernel land, as well as some tooling improvements and reverse engineering sessions. At this point, Asahi Linux is usable as a basic Linux desktop (without GPU acceleration)! The ground had been shifting until now, but we’re seeing drivers settle down. Let’s take a look at what’s been going on.

  • Asahi Linux Progress Report September [LWN.net]

    The Asahi Linux project has a progress report on its goal of running Linux on Mac M1 hardware.

  • Asahi Linux On The Apple M1: "Usable As A Basic Linux Desktop" Sans GPU Acceleration

    The Asahi Linux project that has been working nearly the past year on bringing up Apple M1 support under Linux has issued their September 2021 porting and reverse engineering report.

    With the progress made over the past month, "Asahi Linux is usable as a basic Linux desktop (without GPU acceleration)!"

    There are many new Apple M1 driver submissions under review for mainline inclusion on Linux, including around pinctrl, I2C driver, ASC mailbox, IOMMU 4K handling, and device power management. CPU core frequency scaling support meanwhile is currently undergoing a clean-up before being posted as a "request for comments" series. There is also development work happening on the RTKit layer, NVMe + SART, and DCP code.

    Bringing up the Apple M1 graphics with a kernel DRM driver and the necessary OpenGL/Vulkan Mesa driver code remains the big elephant in the room but progress continues to be made there too.

Progress report: Asahi Linux brings forth a usable basic desktop

  • Progress report: Asahi Linux brings forth a usable basic desktop on Apple's M1

    Efforts to bring Linux to Apple Silicon have resulted in a basic functional desktop, according to the Asahi Linux team.

    The project kicked off in earnest with a lengthy blog post earlier this year detailing the challenges involved in getting the OS onto Apple's latest and greatest.

    Since then Apple M1 support has been sidling into the Linux kernel and by August the GNOME desktop was shown booting up with the experience described as "not great, but usable."

    September's progress report, published today by founder Hector Martin, was packed with good news for fans of the project, including the comment that Asahi Linux "is usable as a basic Linux desktop" albeit without GUI acceleration.

    As for what desktop, Martin told The Register: "Whatever desktop you want, that's up to you!"

9to5Mac on Linux... when it's controlled by Apple

More on the story

  • Linux Finally Runs on Apple's M1-Based Computer Natively | Tom's Hardware

    Bringing Apple M1 support to Linux has been quite a journey so far as Apple's system-on-chips (SoCs) use loads of proprietary technologies and methods, and Apple has not been exactly cooperative. However, developers have managed to run Linux on an Apple M1-based system and at this point the machine can be used for basic things.

    Asahi Linux, a project and community that is working to port Linux to Apple Silicon Macs, is usable as a basic Linux desktop on an Apple M1-powered PC, but without GPU acceleration, according to the progress report.

    So far, developers of Asahi Linux have managed to merge various drivers (PCIe, USB-C PD, etc.) and bindings (PCIe) for Linux 5.16. They also managed to make things like pinctrl driver (Apple GPIO pin control), I2C driver, device power management, NVMe + SART driver, and DCP (display control) driver work.

    "With these drivers, M1 Macs are actually usable as desktop Linux machines," said Hector Martin, the head of the project. "While there is no GPU acceleration yet, the M1's CPUs are so powerful that a software-rendered desktop is actually faster on them than on e.g., Rockchip ARM64 machines with hardware acceleration."

Asahi Linux cites progress, says that Linux is now “usable as...

  • Asahi Linux cites progress, says that Linux is now “usable as a basic desktop” on M1-based Macs

    After almost a year of a project to port Linux to Apple’s M1-based Macs, the creators of the effort have stated that Linux is now “usable as a basic desktop.”

    According to the progress report of September, Asahi Linux is running better than ever, although it still lacks GPU acceleration on M1 Macs as the team approached version 5.16 of the software.

    The team was able to merge some of the drivers such as PCIe bindings, PCIe drive, and USB-C PD drive. Efforts such as Princtrl drive, I2C driver, ASC mailbox driver, IOMMU 4K patches, and Device Power management are still in review.

By Brad Linder

  • Linux for Apple Silicon is getting closer to being usable for basic computing

    Apple’s Macs with M1 processors deliver some of the best performance-per-watt of any personal computers to date, but there’s a down side for some users – the only operating system that’s officially supported is MacOS.

    Unofficially though? Developers have been working to port Linux to play well with Apple Silicon since shortly after the first Macs with M1 chips arrived, and they’ve made a lot of progress in recent months. The developers behind the Asahi Linux project say the operating system is now “usable as a basic Linux desktop” on Macs with Apple Silicon.

Developers finally get Linux running on an Apple M1-powered Mac

  • Developers finally get Linux running on an Apple M1-powered Mac

    This massive feat was achieved by having a bunch of drivers merged (or in review) for Linux 5.16, which includes drivers for the PCIe, USB-C PD, ASC mailbox, etc. If you're wondering if any of this is legal, don't worry. So long as no code is taken from macOS to build Linux support, it's legal to distribute.

    "With these drivers, M1 Macs are usable as desktop Linux machines! While there is no GPU acceleration yet, the M1's CPUs are so powerful that a software-rendered desktop is actually faster on them than on e.g., Rockchip ARM64 machines with hardware acceleration." wrote Hector "marcan" Martin, who's leading the development of Ashai Linux.

    Now that Linux is running, expect to see an official installer made available for download soon for anyone adventurous enough to try it themselves. Since there are still some missing features, however, tinker at your own risk.

    "Remember, there are still many missing bits (USB3, TB, camera, GPU, audio, etc.) as well as patchsets a bit too problematic to bundle as-is at this time (WiFi, which needs significant rewrites), so don't expect this to be anywhere near the polished experience that is the goal of our project. That said, we hope this will allow those willing to be on the absolute bleeding edge to get a taste for what running Linux on these machines is like—and, for some, this might be enough for production usage."

Apple's M1-Powered Macs Will Soon Finally Run Linux

  • Apple's M1-Powered Macs Will Soon Finally Run Linux Natively But There's A Catch

    For those unfamiliar, Asahi Linux is a project to port Linux to the Apple M1 platform. Asahi ringo is the name of the familiar McIntosh variety of apple in Japan, so naturally it follows that Linux for the Apple Macintosh is called Asahi Linux. The project is headed up by Hector Martin (also known as marcan42), most famous for his incredible achievements while reverse-engineering game console hardware, such as the Nintendo Wii and Sony's PlayStation 3 and 4.

Asahi Linux is taking shape for Apple M1

  • Asahi Linux is taking shape for Apple M1

    The Asahi Linux project is working on porting the free operating system to the current M1 architecture from Apple. Progress is explained in a monthly status report. The primary focus of the latest development is the inclusion of important components in the Linux kernel. The declared goal of Asahi Linux is to publish all improvements directly in the respective upstream projects.

    The have already been merged for the 5.16 kernel PCIe bindings , which also allow other operating systems such as OpenBSD to use the same boot loader. In addition, the required could already be included PCIe and USB-C drivers in the kernel tree. A driver to support the power management is in the verification , as is the CPU frequency scaling phase , on which the final work is being carried out.

Linux Can Now Run on Apple’s M1 Chipset

  • Linux Can Now Run on Apple’s M1 Chipset

    Linux users looking to take advantage of Apple Silicon are about to get their wish with the M1 chipset.

    It seemed only yesterday that a small group of developers began work on porting Linux to the new Apple M1 chipset. The journey was a struggle from day one, given how much proprietary hardware Apple uses. But the work has paid off and Asahi Linux, a community-based project centered around porting a distribution to the Apple M1 chipset, has finally succeeded in getting a usable Linux desktop on the hardware.

    The engineers have merged various drivers and bindings for the 5.16 Linux kernel and even managed to work out the pinctrl driver, I2C driver, device power management, NVMe+SART, and DCP. Thanks to those new drivers, M1 Macs are now a viable option for the Linux operating system.

Another older one

  • Developers finally get Linux running on an Apple M1-powered Mac

    This is a big deal because Apple uses a bunch of proprietary tech that doesn't play nice with you if you're trying to run an operating system that isn't macOS on one of its computers. Some adventurous developers have been trying ways to open up Apple's closed M1 ecosystem for a while now, and Asahi Linux might have just cracked the code.

    The M1 is Apple's custom Arm-based SoC (system on chips) started showing on Macs in 2020 after ditching Intel's x86 silicon chip. The M1 is the most powerful chip Apple's ever made, so you can imagine why some folks might want to run Linux and, let's say, install Proton, which would turn their Mac into a killer gaming PC.

Asahi Linux Starts Eyeing Their Bring-Up

  • Apple Announces The M1 Pro / M1 Max, Asahi Linux Starts Eyeing Their Bring-Up

    Apple today announced the M1 Pro and M1 Max as their most powerful SoCs ever built by the company. The new chips feature up to a 10-core processor, 32-core GPU, and up to 64GB of unified memory.

    While the Apple M1 was already well regarded for its speed, the M1 Pro and M1 Max are said to deliver up to 70% faster CPU performance than last year's M1. Meanwhile the GPU within the M1 Pro is up to 2x faster than the M1 while the M1 Max's GPU is said to be 4x faster.

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