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SUSE: Clown Computing and Rancher News

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SUSE
  • Ready to Solve for What's Next? Join SUSE at Google Cloud Next! | SUSE Communities

    Google has created a premier digital event. I know most folks are tired of seeing the word “digital” preceding the word “event” and are ready to get out and physically “be” at an event – I know I am! Google did an excellent job at structuring this event to make it engaging and customizable. There are keynotes by Sundar Pichai, Google and Alphabet CEO, and Thomas Kurian, Google Cloud CEO, to set the tone on day one. Urs Hölzle, Google Cloud SVP of Technical Infrastructure, will share the vision of the top three cloud technology trends for the next decade on day two.

  • End-to-end Encryption for Your Rancher Cluster with Linkerd | SUSE Communities

    SUSE One Partner, Bouyant, has offerings live in the SUSE Rancher Apps and Marketplace and we’ve invited Bouyant to author a guest blog so you can learn more about leveraging the Linkerd service mesh with SUSE Rancher. Originally create by Bouyant, Linkerd is one of only 16 projects carrying the CNCF’s Graduated project status. Bouyant also provides a Linkerd extension to connect to the Bouyant cloud service. Cool stuff. ~Bret

  • SUSE Enterprise Storage: What is next?

    Late last year, SUSE completed their acquisition of Rancher Labs, and in doing so, has had to make some decisions on their product roadmap and ongoing support commitments.

    SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE’s software-defined storage product based on Ceph, doesn’t appear to have made the cut. According to their support pages, it is scheduled for End of Life with milestones in January 2021 and 2022.

    If you are currently running SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, general support will end 31st January 2022. It appears there is a limited path forward for one last year of support, by upgrading to SES 7, but other alternatives could be considered, especially in the light of the recent developments.

SUSE Harvester

  • SUSE Harvester: Deploying virtual machines with Kubernetes

    I use Kubernetes. You use Kubernetes. We all use Kubernetes to manage containers. What you couldn't do, though, is use Kubernetes to manage virtual machines (VM)s as well. That was another ballgame. Until now. SUSE, the European Linux giant with one foot in containers and cloud computing, has released the first production version of Harvester, which along with Rancher, SUSE's Kubernetes as a Service offering, enables you to unify the delivery of VMs and containers

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New Arduino Projects/Showcase

  • Labyrinthian Circuit Sculpture Evokes Moods With Sound And Light | Hackaday

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  • This Arduino radio looks like something from 100 years ago | Arduino Blog

    As time has progressed, personal radios have shrunk from the size of a large filing cabinet down to a tiny circuit that can be integrated into other ICs. Instructables user exposedwire wanted to bring back the feeling of a vintage 1920s radio set, so they built one out of wood that carries the same antique feeling with some more modern features. For the electronics, exposedwire went with an Arduino Uno for the main control board, along with a TEA5767 FM receiver IC that communicates with the Uno over I2C. The currently tuned frequency is displayed on a seven-segment LED module, which is driven by the ubiquitous TM1637 chip. The station can be changed by rotating the accompanying rotary encoder. Finally, the resulting audio signal is sent from the TEA1637 to an NS8002 amplifier and outputted from a small speaker.

  • Quit Hunching Over Your Screen With A Little Robotic Help | Hackaday

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