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Kernel: Performance, Chinese Hardware, and DAMON

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Linux
  • 7.4M IOPS Achieved Per-Core With Newest Linux Patches - Phoronix

    Linux block subsystem maintainer and lead IO_uring developer Jens Axboe had a goal of hitting 7M IOPS per-core performance this week. On Monday he managed to already hit 7.2M IOPS and today hit 7.4M IOPS with his latest work-in-progress kernel patches.

    This month Jens Axboe has been making some remarkable improvements to the Linux block code for squeezing out every bit of I/O potential of the system. Yesterday Jens Axboe was hitting 7.2M IOPS with new persistent DMA map patches that also shaved off around 10% of synchronization latency.

  • Loongson Volleys Latest Patches For LoongArch Linux Support - Phoronix

    Chinese vendor Loongson continues working on their Linux kernel patches enabling the LoongArch processor ISA as their fork from MIPS. While early on when copying existing MIPS open-source code they were quick to call their new ISA "not MIPS", in these later patch series they continue to refer to their ISA as "a bit like MIPS or RISC-V."

    LoongArch debuted this summer with their Loongson 3A5000 processors and since then their engineers have been working to get the LoongArch support into the mainline kernel. Loongson though has ruffled some feathers of the upstream kernel developers with in some areas just copying existing MIPS code.

  • DAMON Extended To Offer Physical Memory Address Space Monitoring - Phoronix

    One of many exciting additions with the forthcoming Linux 5.15 kernel is DAMON landed as a data access monitoring framework. DAMON opens up new possibilities around proactive reclamation of system memory and other interesting features. Currently though it's limited to monitoring the virtual address space of the kernel but a new set of patches out allow for physical address space monitoring as well.

More in Tux Machines

What Happens When You Run a Command in Linux?

Most Linux users are often unaware of the internal working of the operating system. You might be running Linux commands on the shell for a long time, but have you ever wondered what's happening behind the scenes when you hit Enter? By the end, you'll have a brief understanding of how the shell processes the typed command in Linux. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install SuiteCRM on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    SuiteCRM is a free open source Customer Relationship Management application for servers. It is written in PHP. Open source CRM is often used as an alternative to proprietary CRM software from major corporations such as HubSpot, Salesforce and Microsoft Dynamics CRM applications. SuiteCRM is a software fork of the popular customer relationship management (CRM) system from SugarCRM. The SuiteCRM project started when SugarCRM decided to stop development of its open-source version. In this guide, we will show you how to install SuiteCRM in your CentOS 8 Linux.

  • How to Install & Configure VNC Server on CentOS 8, Rocky Linux 8, or AlmaLinux 8 - ByteXD

    Virtual Network Computing, commonly known as VNC, is a platform-independent protocol that uses the client-server architecture to access a remote computer over a network. It enables users to access the remote computer’s graphical desktop and send mouse clicks and keyboard strokes to the remote system. Alternatives to VNC for CentOS that we have covered are xRDP and X2Go. All these technologies have similar goals, but their methods for achieving them differ. This post will give you a step-by-step tutorial for installing and configuring a VNC server on your CentOS 8, Rocky Linux 8 or AlmaLinux 8, along with how to install and use multiple popular desktop environments. Over the course of this article we’ll refer to all 3 operating systems when mentioning only CentOS 8, to avoid repeating all 3 every time. Also, the screenshots provided in this tutorial are mostly from CentOS 8. I have provided a few from Rocky Linux 8 and AlmaLinux 8, to prove that I have also tested this tutorial on them.

  • How to Install Apache Spark on Debian 11

    Apache Spark is a free, open-source, general-purpose and distributed computational framework that is created to provide faster computational results. It supports several APIs for streaming, graph processing including, Java, Python, Scala, and R. Generally, Apache Spark can be used in Hadoop clusters, but you can also install it in standalone mode. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Apache Spark framework on Debian 11.

  • How to Install Specific Version of Package using DNF

    As part of application requirements or testing, you might need to install specific version of a package. DNF is a package manager for RPM-based Linux distributions such Fedora, RHEL, Rocky Linux, AlmaLinux, and more. In this tutorial, we learn how to install specific version of package using DNF.

  • How to Install Unity Desktop on Ubuntu 21.10 Impish Indri - LinuxCapable

    Unity Desktop Environment is a graphical shell for the GNOME desktop environment created and maintained by Canonical for Ubuntu operating systems. As time has passed and Ubuntu is now officially using GNOME as the default desktop environment, it is maintained and developed by the Unity7 Maintainers and UBports. With Ubuntu 21.10 being released, another Unity Desktop environment has occupied it. This release still uses the Unity 7 interface as the UnityX 10 is still under development. However, in further Ubuntu distribution releases, this interface will undoubtedly appear. Overall, Unity is an excellent option for its speed, alternative looks to rival any other Desktop Environment. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Unity on Ubuntu 21.10 with various options.

  • How to install Craft CMS on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Focal Fossa - Linux Shout

    Just like WordPress, we have another open-source Craft CMS that is a new and innovative content management system with a large community of developers and communities worldwide. Here we learn the steps to Install Craft CMS on Ubuntu 20.04 or 18.04. It is an open-source CMS based on PHP / MySQL with the TWIG template engine, flexible in nature, and has a user-friendly interface for creating digital current and administrative tasks. Craft CMS also offers a built-in plugin store with hundreds of free and paid plugins. Whereas is robust framework allows developers to develop modules and plugins.

  • Install Guacamole for Remote Linux/Windows Access in Ubuntu [Ed: Just updated]

    As a system administrator, you may find yourself (today or in the future) working in an environment where Windows and Linux coexist. It is no secret that some big companies prefer (or have to) run some of their production services in Windows boxes and others in Linux servers.

Today in Techrights

Programming Leftovers

  • ThreatMapper: Open source platform for scanning runtime environments - Help Net Security

    Deepfence announced open source availability of ThreatMapper, a signature offering that automatically scans, maps and ranks application vulnerabilities across serverless, Kubernetes, container and multi-cloud environments.

  • Josef Strzibny: Organizing business logic in Rails with contexts

    Rails programmers have almost always tried to figure out the golden approach to business logic in their applications. From getting better at object-oriented design, to service objects, all the way to entirely new ideas like Trailblazer or leaving Active Record altogether. Here’s one more design approach that’s clean yet railsy.

  • Status update, October 2021

    On this dreary morning here in Amsterdam, I’ve made my cup of coffee and snuggled my cat, and so I’m pleased to share some FOSS news with you. Some cool news today! We’re preparing for a new core product launch at sr.ht, cool updates for our secret programming language, plus news for visurf. Simon Ser has been hard at work on expanding his soju and gamja projects for the purpose of creating a new core sourcehut product: chat.sr.ht. We’re rolling this out in a private beta at first, to seek a fuller understanding of the system’s performance characteristics, to make sure everything is well-tested and reliable, and to make plans for scaling, maintenance, and general availability. In short, chat.sr.ht is a hosted IRC bouncer which is being made available to all paid sr.ht users, and a kind of webchat gateway which will be offered to unpaid and anonymous users. I’m pretty excited about it, and looking forward to posting a more detailed announcement in a couple of weeks. In other sourcehut news, work on GraphQL continues, with paste.sr.ht landing and todo.sr.ht’s writable API in progress. Our programming langauge project grew some interesting features this month as well, the most notable of which is probably reflection. I wrote an earlier blog post which goes over this in some detail. There’s also ongoing work to develop the standard library’s time and date support, riscv64 support is essentially done, and we’ve overhauled the grammar for switch and match statements to reduce a level of indentation for typical code. In the coming weeks, I hope to see date/time support and reflection fleshed out much more, and to see some more development on the self-hosted compiler. [...] The goal of this project is to provide a conservative CSS toolkit which allows you to build web interfaces which are compatible with marginalized browsers like Netsurf and Lynx.

  • Monthly Report - September

    The month of September is very special to me personaly. Why? Well, I got married in the very same month 18 years ago. The best part is, I choose the day 11 to get married. I have never missed my wedding anniversary, thanks to all the TV news channel.

  • My Favorite Warnings: uninitialized | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    This warning was touched on in A Belated Introduction, but I thought it deserved its own entry. When a Perl scalar comes into being, be it an actual scalar variable or an array or hash entry, its value is undef. Now, the results of operating on an undef value are perfectly well-defined: in a nuneric context it is 0, in a string context it is '', and in a Boolean context it is false. The thing is, if you actually operate on such a value, did you mean to do it, or did you forget to initialize something, or initialize the wrong thing, or operate on the wrong thing? Because of the latter possibilities Perl will warn about such operations if the uninitialized warning is enabled.