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IBM/Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

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  • ModelMesh and KServe bring eXtreme scale standardized model inferencing on Kubernetes

    One of the most fundamental parts of an AI application is model serving, which is responding to a user request with an inference from an AI model. With machine learning approaches becoming more widely adopted in organizations, there is a trend to deploy a large number of models. For internet-scale AI applications like IBM Watson Assistant and IBM Watson Natural Language Understanding, there isn’t just one AI model, there are literally hundreds or thousands that are running concurrently. Because AI models are computationally expensive, it’s cost prohibitive to load them all at once or to create a dedicated container to serve every trained model. Also, many are rarely used or are effectively abandoned.

    When dealing with a large number of models, the ‘one model, one server’ paradigm presents challenges on a Kubernetes cluster to deploy hundreds of thousands of models.

  • The Application Hierarchy of Needs for SREs and IT Operators – IBM Developer

    The Hierarchy of Needs was defined by the psychologist Abraham Maslow in his paper “A Theory of Human Motivation.” The base of the pyramid contains the most fundamental and most critical needs, with each subsequent layer representing needs that become important once those of the preceding layer have been satisfied.
    Maslow’s “Hierarchy of Needs” was used to represent the needs and behavioral motivation drivers for humans. This pyramid represented a series of basic psychological and self-fulfillment needs.

    Maslow’s hierarchy of needs has been adapted and adopted to represent the needs and motivations in other domains, including the needs of applications and services being managed by SREs and IT Operations teams.

  • A Red Hat validated pattern for Industrial Edge

    We've improved on the technology of our AI/ML Industrial Edge solution, designed to boost manufacturing efficiency and product quality with AI/ML, edge computing and Kubernetes. Let's see what's new!

  • Meet single node OpenShift: Our newest small OpenShift footprint for edge architectures

    Single node OpenShift is here, putting both control and worker capabilities into a single server to help fit into space-constrained environments.

  • Single node OpenShift at the manufacturing edge

    Where does it make sense to utilize single node OpenShift? Learn how it can help at the manufacturing edge!

  • Transitioning Red Hat’s Marketing leadership

    Today, we are sharing news that Tim Yeaton, Red Hat’s executive vice president and chief marketing officer (CMO) will retire in 2022. We’ve had the benefit of planning for Tim’s retirement for some time and using Red Hat’s succession planning process to identify and develop our next CMO. Long time Red Hat marketing communications and brand leader Leigh Day has been promoted to senior vice president (SVP) of Marketing and in January, she will assume the role of CMO. Until his retirement in mid-2022, Tim will become a senior advisor at Red Hat, helping with a smooth transition.

  • Customer experience (CX) plans: 5 questions to ask | The Enterprisers Project

    The pressure is on for companies to deliver a top-notch customer experience (CX). But to deliver a high-quality and holistic CX, you need to invest in the right data and technology. For IT leaders facing an abundance of options, investing in technology to enhance CX can feel like a gamble.

  • IBM Cheese Cutter Restoration | Hackaday

    For a while now, Mac Pro towers have had the nickname “cheese grater” because of their superficial resemblance to this kitchen appliance. Apple has only been a company since the 70s, though, and is much newer than one of its historic rivals, IBM. In fact, IBM is old enough to have made actual cheese-related computers as far back as the 1910s, and [Hand Tool Rescue] recently obtained one of these antique machines for a complete restoration.

  • Going to market with an open source product

    Many people with a long career in engineering, including me, have had misconceptions about sales and marketing. As an engineering community, we've viewed it as things like ordering swag, naming things, running ad campaigns, and creating white papers. There's a joke in the marketing community about how engineers are always willing to provide their "opinions" on marketing decisions without fully comprehending the discipline, but marketers rarely—like never—make suggestions on code improvements. To work together, engineers and marketers must share a common definition.

    While product marketers do help drive those commonly recognized tasks, the role is so much richer. Product marketers, technical marketers, and evangelists have outbound responsibilities like creating content (e.g., blogs, press releases, white papers, demos), delivering roadmap sessions to customers (as well as analysts and journalists), building content for sales teams, and much more. Combined, these outbound functions are often referred to as getting a product to market, but just as importantly, product marketing also has inbound functions. They serve as another set of eyes and ears to listen for customer needs and provide input to the product strategy. There's a saying in product management: nothing interesting happens within these four walls. Businesses must go out into the world, talk to customers, and more importantly, listen to them.

  • SUSE Announces Integration Of SUSE Rancher With Harvester

More in Tux Machines

Videos/Shows: Ubuntu 21.10, LHS, and Chris Titus

  • Ubuntu 21.10 - Full Review - Invidious

    Ubuntu 21.10 finally features the GNOME 40 desktop, better Wayland support, and more. In this video, I'll give you my thoughts on "Impish Idri" and we'll go over some of the new features. I'll talk about the installation process, Wayland changes,

  • LHS Episode #435: The Weekender LXXX

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Time to Rice and Make the Best Looking Desktop - Invidious

    We have our script that sets up the system... now we make our script to automatically make our desktop the best looking one out there!

today's howtos

  • Sourcing a file in Linux: Here are the basics of this important concept - TechRepublic

    Open source expert Jack Wallen explains the Linux source command and offers an example.

  • How to play Legion TD 2 on Linux

    Legion TD 2 is a tower defense game for Windows. It was developed and published by AutoAttack Games. Thanks to Proton, you’ll be able to play this game on Linux. Here’s how.

  • How to play Stick Fight: The Game on Linux

    Stick Fight: The Game is a physics-based online fighting game for PC. It was developed by Landfall West and published by Landfall. Here’s how you can enjoy Stick Fight: The Game on Linux.

  • Setting up a ThinkPad x250 with Linux

    Two chapters in this article are Debian-specific, the rest is more or less Archlinux-specific. It never grew into the device-specific alround tutorial I envisioned and has been partially superseded by this article. The ThinkPad itself is in daily use. No regrets there!

  • How to Install Fish Shell on CentOS 8 and Rocky Linux 8 – VITUX

    Fish Shell also known as ‘Friendly interactive shell’ used for Unix/Linux-like operating distributions. It provides a smart, fully equipped, and user-friendly command-line environment for all Linux users. Fish shell supports various features unlike any other shell such as autosuggestion, Tab completion, syntax highlighting, Sane Scripting, Glorious VGA Color, and web-based configuration. Using this interactive shell environment, you do not need to remember a bunch of Linux commands because it is more productive and comes with various handy features. We will talk about the installation of interactive Fish Shell on CentOS 8 in this tutorial. The same steps apply to Rocky Linux and AlmaLinux too.

  • How to disable Special keys Windows 10 (Sticky keys) | ITIGIC - TechStony

    They are keys that exist since the first versions of Windows and continue in the most recent versions, including Windows 10. Therefore, we are going to tell you what the special keys or Sticky Keys consist of and how to deactivate them because you have already tired of having them in your computer (or because they hinder you).

  • How to install Devuan(II) - Unixcop

    In this article I show how to install Devuan using the installer included in the desktop-live iso, refractainstaller. In a previous article I’ve showed how to install it using the net-install ISO. From the devuan site: Devuan GNU+Linux is a fork of Debian without systemd that allows users to reclaim control over their system by avoiding unnecessary entanglements and ensuring Init Freedom.

  • How to install and configure NextCloud on Centos 8 and LEMP

    In this guide, we are going to set up NextCloud on a Centos 8 server hosted with Nginx and php (LEMP stack). We will be using Mysql 8 and PHP 7.4 for this guide.This will also work for RHEL derivatives like Alma Linux 8, Rocky Linux 8 and RHEL 8. Nextcloud is an Open Source suite of client-server software for creating and using file hosting services. It is a a free self-hosted cloud storage solution similar to Dropbox, Google Drive, etc. With Nextcloud, you don’t have to worry about the pricey alternatives and since you will host your own files, you don’t have to worry about privacy or someone collecting your data.

Kernel: Paul E. Mc Kenney and New Stuff in Linux

  • Paul E. Mc Kenney: TL;DR: Memory-Model Recommendations for Rusting the Linux Kernel

    These recommendations assume that the initial Linux-kernel targets for Rust developers are device drivers that do not have unusual performance and scalability requirements, meaning that wrappering of small C-language functions is tolerable. (Please note that most device drivers fit into this category.) It also assumes that the main goal is to reduce memory-safety bugs, although other bugs might be addressed as well. Or, Murphy being Murphy, created as well. But that is a risk in all software development, not just Rust in the Linux kernel. Those interested in getting Rust into Linux-kernel device drivers sooner rather than later should look at the short-term recommendations, while those interested in extending Rust's (and, for that matter, C's) concurrency capabilities might be more interested in the long-term recommendations.

  • Verification Challenges

    You would like to do some formal verification of C code? Or you would like a challenge for your formal-verification tool? Either way, here you go!

  • Cluster Scheduler Support Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.16 - Phoronix

    Cluster scheduler support has been queued up for landing in the Linux 5.16 kernel for AArch64 and x86_64 systems for improving the CPU scheduler behavior for systems that have clusters of CPU cores. The cluster scheduler support in this context is about enhancing the Linux kernel's scheduler for systems where sets of CPU cores share an L2 cache or other mid-level caches/resources. This cluster scheduler work stems from work by HiSilicon and Huawei aiming to improve the Linux performance for the Kunpeng 920 server chip. That HiSilicon SoC has six or eight clusters per NUMA node with four CPU cores per cluster and a shared L3 cache. With the cluster scheduler patches they were able to enhance the overall performance of the system and also improve the efficiency.

  • AMD Finally Enabling PSR By Default For Newer Hardware With Linux 5.16 - Phoronix

    With it getting late into the Linux 5.15 kernel cycle, the focus is shifting by the Direct Rendering Driver maintainers from new feature work targeting the next cycle (5.16) to instead on bug fixes. AMD sent out a pull request of new AMDGPU Linux 5.16 material this week that is primarily delivering bug fixes but one notable addition is finally enabling PSR by default for newer GPUs.

  • Intel Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 Ships Updated DG1 Support - Phoronix

    Intel's open-source engineers have shipped Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 as the newest version of this Linux compute stack enabling OpenCL and Level Zero support with their graphics processors. Intel Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 is the latest weekly update for this compute stack. New this week is updated DG1 platform support and Level Zero support for SPIR-V static module linking.

OpenSSH, Squid, PostgreSQL Update in Tumbleweed

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week have brought updates for text editors, browsers, emails clients, database management systems and many other pieces of software. Mozilla Firefox, Thunderbird, nano, and PostgreSQL were all in the latest 20211012 snapshot. A new major version of Firefox 93.0 added support for the optimised image format AVIF, which offers a significant file size reduction as opposed to other image formats. The browser also improved web compatibility for privacy protections and fixed more than a handful of Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. Thunderbird 91.2.0 addressed many of the same CVEs, fixed some issues with the calendar and fixed the new mail notifications that did not properly take subfolders into account. The 5.9 version of text editor nano added syntax highlighting for YAML files and fetchmail 6.4.22 added a few patches, addressed a CVE related to an IMAP connections and now highlights being compatible with OpenSSL 1.1.1 and 3.0.0. The new major version of postgresql 14 provided improvements for heavy workloads, enhanced distributed workloads and added a couple more predefined roles like pg_read_all_data, pg_write_all_data and pg_database_owner. Other packages to update in the snapshot were GNOME’s document viewer evince 41.2, Flatpak 1.12.1, graphics library gegl 0.4.32, glusterfs 9.3 and many RubyGems and YaST package updates. Read more Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the weeks 2021/40 & 41