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Removing files from /tmp at shut down

Filed under
HowTos

Your /tmp directory in Linux is a handy place for your OS to stick files that it may need at the moment but won’t need down the road. While this is great for the OS (and you if you want to use it yourself feel free) it can cause a bit of clutter as files start building up.

There’s a fairly simply way to get rid of these files each time you shut down your machine. It will require a very small amount of hacking on your part, as we modify one file, called sysklogd.

Sysklogd provides two logging services, one for your system and the other for your kernel. It sits in /etc/init.d/ and is a service that starts and stops with your computer.

More Here.



Also:

Listing processes is quite a common task you might have to perform if you’re messing around with your command line interface.

There are actually two great command line tools for listing processes, but in this tip post, I’m going to focus on ps.

If you run the command just on its own, you won’t get all that many processes show up:

Command line tips - listing with ps


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