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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • How the Integrated Gradients method works? - Vincent Lequertier's blog

    For artificial intelligence (AI) transparency and to better shape upcoming policies, we need to better understand the AI’s output. In particular, one may want to understand the role attributed to each input. This is hard, because in neural networks input variables don’t have a single weight that could serve as a proxy for determining their importance with regard to the output. Therefore, one have to consider all the neural network’s weights, which may be all interconnected. Here is how Integrated Gradients does this.

  • Want a piece of GitLab? It's going to cost you: IPO price per share settles at $77

    The one-stop shop approach by DevOps darling GitLab appears to have attracted an Initial Public Offering price of $77, giving the loss-making biz a potential valuation of $11bn

    GitLab finally filed for an IPO in September and this week upped the estimated price per share to between $66 and $69. The eventual price has turned out to be $77, well above the initial $55 to $60 first estimated.

    8.42 million shares of Class A common stock are being sold. Founder and CEO Sytse Sijbrandij is selling another 1.98 million shares, according to the filing. Should that $77 price survive the start of trading today, GitLab's market value will nudge past $11bn.

  • Functional vs. object-oriented programming: The basics

    Committing to a programming paradigm is an important step in any application development effort. While they are hardly the only two options when it comes to overarching development models, the choice between functional programming and object-oriented programming is one that an increasing number of developers face today.

  • There is no 'printf'.

    Pop quiz! What will the following program return?

  • Malicious packages mitmproxy2 and mitmproxy-iframe removed from PyPI directory - itsfoss.net

    The author of mitmproxy , a tool for analyzing HTTP / HTTPS traffic, drew attention to the appearance of a fork of his project in the Python Package Index (PyPI) directory. The fork was distributed under the similar name mitmproxy2 and the non-existent version 8.0.1 (current release of mitmproxy 7.0.4) with the expectation that inattentive users will perceive the package as a new version of the main project ( typesquatting ) and wish to try the new version.

    In terms of its composition, mitmproxy2 was similar to mitmproxy, with the exception of changes in the implementation of malicious functionality. The changes were reduced to the termination of setting the HTTP header ” X-Frame-Options: DENY “, which prohibits the processing of content inside the iframe, disabling protection against XSRF attacks and setting the headers ” Access-Control-Allow-Origin: * “, ” Access-Control- Allow-Headers: * “and” Access-Control-Allow-Methods: POST, GET, DELETE, OPTIONS “.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 134: Pandigital Numbers and Distinct Term Count
  • Sourcing vs executing in Bash

    What if, from the shell prompt, I could source the script, to bring the function definitions into my current environment, and then manually invoke the check function on a single pull request?

    Sourcing the script as it is would have the unwanted effect of running checks on all the pull requests, because the last line in the script actually invokes main, as it’s supposed to.

  • Rust-Based Cloud-Hypervisor 19.0 Released With Improved Live Migration, Faster Boot Time - Phoronix

    Cloud-Hypervisor 19.0 debuted this week as the Intel-led open-source VMM focused on supporting modern cloud workloads and written in the Rust programming language while leveraging the Linux's KVM virtualization code or the Microsoft MSHV hypervisor on Windows.

    Cloud-Hypervisor 19.0 continues to focus on only supporting 64-bit software, providing a minimal attack surface and other security improvements in part by leveraging Rust, and other modern-focused design principals.

  • Dyn async traits, part 6

    A quick update to my last post: first, a better way to do what I was trying to do, and second, a sketch of the crate I’d like to see for experimental purposes.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Arch-Based Steam Deck, VR, and RetroArch

  • dbrand are cooking up something big for the Steam Deck | GamingOnLinux

    It's not entirely clear what dbrand has planned, however their team are clearly cooking up something with a teaser being posted on Twitter. Who are dbrand? They're a company that specialises in creating custom skins, cases, screen protectors and plenty more for various hardware from phones to consoles and stuff in between - they even make face masks. They're really popular so it's not surprising to see plenty of excitement around their plans for the Steam Deck.

  • One of the most challenging VR rhythm games releases February 10 | GamingOnLinux

    VR rhythm game Groove Gunner from BitCutter Studios Inc will be leaving Early Access on February 10. If you own a VR kit, this is one you need to try. It will make you sweat - probably a lot. Much like other rhythm games, it's all about speed and accuracy. Instead of cutting through blocks like you do in Beat Saber, you have two coloured guns which you use to shoot and each arm also has a shield that you need to block incoming projectiles with. It's very different to any other rhythm game and easily stands above some other attempts to make a VR game.

  • RetroArch need your feedback on their Open-Hardware planned for 2022 | GamingOnLinux

    RetroArch announced back in February 2021 their plans for the Open-Hardware project. This was to bring an easy way for you to play your legally owned physical games directly in emulators and they have an update on their plans. The idea is a sound one. Giving you open source hardware to plug in various cartridges from retro consoles, with great integration with RetroArch directly. You would no longer need to rely on various hard to come by proprietary solutions. In the new blog post though, plans have changed - and sounds like it's for the better.

KDE: The 15-Minute Bug Initiative

  • The 15-Minute Bug Initiative

    In my 2022 roadmap, I mentioned something called the “15-Minute Bug Initiative.” Today I’d like to flesh it out and request participation! This blog post is not only informational, but I really hope any developers reading along will get excited and decide to participate. KDE software has historically been accused of being resource-intensive, ugly, and buggy. Over the years we’ve largely resolved the first two, but the issue of bugginess persists. Have you ever had that experience where you’re introducing someone to a KDE Plasma system and to your horror, they run into multiple bugs within moments? These are the issues we need to fix first: those that can be easily encountered within 15 minutes of basic usage. They leave a bad taste in people’s mouths and provide the impression that the system is a house of cards. It’s time to remedy this final strategic weakness of KDE, starting with Plasma itself.

  • KDE begin the 15-Minute Bug Initiative to make Plasma great | GamingOnLinux

    KDE Plasma is a pretty frelling great desktop environment - but couldn't it be better? The KDE team have begun the previously announced 15-Minute Bug Initiative. The idea is to clean up issues in Plasma that affect the user experience within the first 15 minutes of booting. Encountering bugs quickly will put people off and gives a bad impression of not just Plasma, but of Linux as a whole. So this is their time to shine, especially with the Steam Deck coming that uses Plasma for the normal desktop mode.

  • KDE's 15-Minute Bug Initiative Gets Underway - Phoronix

    KDE developer Nate Graham has sorted through plans for the 15-minute bug initiative for focusing on correcting many low-hanging bugs affecting the KDE desktop that should be able to be quickly discovered by users. In recent months KDE developer Nate Graham, who is also known for his wonderful KDE weekly development summaries, has been figuring out how to improve KDE's reliability and one of the main drivers is working on bugs that should take only "15 minutes" or less to be something normal users would encounter. Per the now-published list of 15-minute bug criteria, these are bugs that affect KDE's default setup, are 100% reproducible, something basic that doesn't work or looks visually broken, may cause a crash, requires a reboot or terminal command to fix, there is no workaround, a recent regression, or a bug report with more than five duplicates.

today's howtos

  • Configure Pi-Hole with Ubuntu 20.04 Headless Server

    Today we will discuss Pi-hole configurations and their usability. Though it was not planned, for the last few days, I was writing on firewalls only. Going through different Linux platforms got encountered the server. The service is really interesting. Ads are good for revenue generations, but sometimes it is annoying when considering the production environment. Usually, users have adblockers on their browsers, such add-ons are not so effective sometimes. Either they are required to keep updating all the time or are not able to detect ads in some cases. Here, is the answer Pi-Hole can do all for you. This gateway will get installed on the Network and will start detecting ads and pop-ups across the network and will block them automatically.

  • List All Installed Packages in RHEL and CentOS

    Hi guys, In this small article, we will show you how to list all installed rpm packages on CentOS and RHEL.

  • How to use Cloudformation to create SQS Queues on AWS

    AWS Simple Queue Service (SQS) is a fully managed message queuing service that enables us to decouple and scale microservices, serverless applications, and distributed systems. Using SQS, we can send, store, and receive messages between software components without losing them. AWS SQS offers two types of message queues, Standard queues and FIFO Queues. To understand more about SQS Queues, search for "How to create an SQS Queue on AWS?" article. AWS CloudFormation allows us to use programming languages (yaml/json) or a simple text file to model and provision all the resources needed for our applications. This gives us a single source of truth for our AWS resources. In this article, we will see the steps to create a Standard and FIFO Queue using Cloudformation Stack.

  • How to schedule system updates in CentOS 8 / RockyLinux 8 and keep the system secure

    Hello, friends. In this post, you will learn how to schedule system updates in CentOS / RockyLinux. Thanks to this, you will have an improved way to perform this system task. Upgrading the operating system is a basic task to make it a little more secure and stable. Because this process installs the necessary updates to fix bugs and increase the reliability of the system. Although it is a quick process to do, it can often be forgotten in the hustle and bustle of work and/or study. So we can always have some tools to help us automate the process. If you use CentOS 7 / 8 or any distribution of the RHEL family you may notice that if you go many days without updating the system, it suggests you install dnf-cron or yum-cron according to the version of the system. So, I will show you how to use these tools to schedule system updates.

  • How to install PlayOnLinux on a Chromebook in 2022

    Today we are looking at how to install PlayOnLinux on a Chromebook in 2022. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • Bash Write to File - ByteXD

    Reading and writing to files are common tasks among Linux command-line users. There are two ways in bash you can use to write to files including the redirection operator (>) and the tee command. You need to have write permission in order to input any data into a file, otherwise, you will end up with a permission denied error. In this article, we will discuss the bash write to file operation using the redirection operator and tee command for example.

10.1-inch RPI All-in-One PC review with Raspberry Pi 4

A couple of months ago I received “RPI All-in-One”, a 10.1-inch touchscreen display for Raspberry Pi boards, listed the specifications, checked out the package content, installed a Raspberry Pi 4 inside the display before booting my new all-in-one (AiO) PC successfully. I’ve now had time to spend more time with the PC/display and see how it performs under various conditions. I also tested HDMI and USB-C input features with a laptop and mini PC. Read more