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today's leftovers

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  • Realtek 802.11ax WiFi Driver "rtw89" Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.16 - Phoronix

    Arriving in the wireless-drivers-next branch this week is the "rtw89" driver as a Realtek-contributed open-source 802.11ax WiFi driver.

    This new rtw89 Linux Wifi driver is initially for supporting the Realtek 8852AE 802.11ax ASIC. A new driver was developed rather than extending the existing Realtek wireless kernel drivers since the register address ranges have been totally refined, new formats, and other fundamental changes over existing Realtek wireless chipsets.

  • SALSA Back In Development As A Small ALSA Library For Linux Systems - Phoronix

    Linux sound subsystem maintainer Takashi Iwai of SUSE is back to hacking on SALSA, the "small ALSA" library that he started a decade ago but hadn't seen a new release in six years or any code activity for the past four years... until this week.

  • Is Linux a Waste of Time and Should You Stick to Windows?

    But Linux is not bad just because it's different. Far from being a waste of time, Linux can be one of the most rewarding operating systems to learn, because once you gain knowledge about how it works, that knowledge lasts for a long time.

    No one company has the authority to substantially change how all of Linux works from one release to the next. So if you want a computer you can learn and stick with for a long time to come, Linux can be more than worth the investment of your time.

  • How We Hired Our Last Employee: Equitable Hiring Processes for Small (and Large) Organizations

    It's really hard for Conservancy to hire new employees. Like many small organization that are overloaded with work, it's hard to make the time to conduct a proper hiring process, and no one on staff is dedicated to making sure the process goes smoothly. Because it is very important to our organizational values to make sure that our hiring is fair and also that we wind up with the best person for the job, we were very careful in how we designed our search.

  • Week numbers in LibreOffic Calc

    I use week numbers for all sorts of things. It gives me more granularity than a month, and they’re more accurate for certain use cases. For example, people assume a month has four weeks, but 48 leaves us four weeks short of the 52 weeks in a year. Renters and mortgage payers know all to well the fun of realising a specific month has three payments, not two.

  • Google clarifies Spanner/PostgreSQL interface • The Register

    Google has clarified details of the interface between its popular distributed SQL database-management-cum-storage-service Spanner and the open-source RDBMS PostgreSQL.

    According to a blog published this week, Spanner's PostgreSQL interface uses "the familiarity and portability of PostgreSQL" to make developers' lives easier.

    "Teams can be assured that the schemas and queries they build against the Spanner PostgreSQL interface can be easily ported to another PostgreSQL environment, giving them flexibility and peace of mind," said Justin Makeig, product manager for Cloud Spanner.

  • It's Safety First as 'All Things Open' Returns In-Person on Sunday - FOSS Force

    On Sunday when All Thing’s Open kicks off at the Raleigh Convention Center it will mark a return to in-person events for the open source conference. Like most in-person events, last year ATO was forced to go digital in the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

    To use a term that tech usually reserves for cloud deployments, this year’s All Things Open will be a hybrid event — meaning it’ll take place as an in-person event at the Raleigh Convention Center in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina, and online for folks at home. Even the presentations will be hybrid, with some being live streamed as they take place before an in-person audience, and others being prerecorded and available only online.

    We asked Todd Lewis, the creator and chair of the event that in 2019 drew over 5,000 attendees, how it felt to be launching the in-person part of this years conference now that vaccinations have made that possible, despite the continuing spread of the COVID virus.

  • How to disable Gtk-Message warnings in your app
  • Legacy Social Media: Free as in Beer, Not as in Speech
  • A first for search and rescue from space

    "Once it was confirmed that we could detect the faint transmissions on-board I used 'GNU Radio' to build the signal processing system that would run on the satellite. GNU Radio is a free and open-source library that breaks down complex signal processing systems into simple blocks. The ability to reprogram the SDR payload for any type of signal demonstrates the versatility when open-source software is combined with a powerful space platform such as OPS-SAT."

More in Tux Machines

LoRa expansion boards work with Raspberry Pi SBC and Raspberry Pi Pico board (Crowdfunding)

We’ve covered a number of LoRa solutions based on Raspberry Pi boards, and SB Components is now offering another with the LoRa HAT for Raspberry Pi equipped with an Ebyte E22 LoRa module operating in either the 433 MHz, or 868 and 915 MHz bands. The company also offers a LoRa expansion for Pico based on the same E22 module, adding a small 1.14-inch LCD for information display, and designed for the Raspberry Pi Pico board with the RP2040 dual-core Cortex-M0+ microcontroller. Read more

Programming Leftovers

Proprietary Software and Security Leftovers

  • Microsoft a big part of the cyber security problem: Proofpoint exec

    Microsoft's technology plays a big role in facilitating increasingly devastating cyber attacks, a senior official at an email security firm says, accusing the Redmond behemoth of profiting from the existence of vulnerabilities.

  • 5G now means some flights won’t be able to land when pilots can’t see the runway

    Verizon and AT&T are hoping new swaths of C-band cellular radio spectrum will help make the 5G hype closer to reality, but the big mid-band 5G rollout may have a side effect. Airplanes rely on radio altimeters to tell how high they are above the ground to safely land when pilots can’t see, and the FAA is now instructing 6,834 of them to not do that at certain airports because of 5G interference.

    The FAA ruled on Tuesday that those thousands of US planes (and some helicopters) won’t be able to use many of the guided and automatic landing systems that are designed to work in poor visibility conditions, if they’re landing at an airport where there’s deemed to be enough interference that their altimeters aren’t reliable. “Landings during periods of low visibility could be limited due to concerns that the 5G signal could interfere with the accuracy of an airplane’s radio altimeter, without other mitigations in place,” an FAA spokesman tells The Verge.

  • Open source cloud native security analyzer Terrascan embeds security into native DevOps tooling - Help Net Security

    Tenable enhanced Terrascan, an open source cloud native security analyzer that helps developers secure Infrastructure as Code (IaC). The new capabilities enable organizations to embed security into their DevOps tooling, pipelines and supply chains, mitigating risks before infrastructure is provisioned.

  • Google Disrupts Botnet Targeting Windows Machines

    The company has also launched litigation against the Glupteba botnet, marking the first lawsuit against a blockchain-enabled botnet.

  • Pay a Hacker, Save a Life

Zorin OS 16 Lite Edition is Finally Here

Zorin OS 16 Lite brings all the goodness of Zorin OS 16 with an Xfce desktop environment. Let us take a look at it here. Read more