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Emmanuele Bassi: GWeather next

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Development
GNOME

Libgweather, the small GNOME library that queries weather services, is getting a major version bump to allow applications using it to be ported to GTK4.

In the beginning, there was a weather applet in the GNOME panel. It had a bunch of code that poked at a couple of websites to get the weather information for a given airport or weather observation stations, and shipped with a list of locations and their nearest METAR code.

In 2007, the relevant code was moved to its own separate repository, so that other applications and system settings could reuse the same code as the panel applet: the libgweather library was born. Aside from the basic weather information and location objects, libgweather also had a couple of widgets: one for selecting a location (with autocompletion), and one for selecting a timezone using a location.

Since libgweather was still very much an ad hoc library for a handful of applications, there was no explicit API and ABI stability guarantee made by its maintainers; in fact, in order to use it, you had to “opt in” with a specific C pre-processor symbol.

Time passed, and a few more applications appeared during the initial GNOME 3 cycles—like Weather, followed by Clocks a month later. Most of the consumers of libgweather were actually going through a language binding, which meant they were not really “opting into” the API through the explicit pre-processor symbol; it also meant that changes in the API and ABI could end up being found only after a libgweather release, instead of during a development cycle. Of course, back then, we only had a single CI/CD pipeline for the whole project, with far too little granularity and far too wide scope. Still, the GWeather consumers were few and far between, and the API was not stabilised.

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