Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's howtos (GIMP only)

More in Tux Machines

Qubes OS 4.1.0-rc4 has been released!

The fourth release candidate for Qubes 4.1.0 is here! There are no major changes to report. We’ve just focused on fixing bugs that were discovered and reported in the third release candidate. If you’re currently using any Qubes 4.1.0 release candidate, a regular update is sufficient to upgrade to the latest one. Otherwise, read on for more about how to get started with testing Qubes 4.1.0-rc4. Read more

Google v. Oracle: The End of an Era - Software Freedom Law Center

The Supreme Court?s April 3rd decision of the long-running dispute between Oracle and Google brings to a last victorious conclusion the free software movement?s legal campaign, which began more than thirty years ago. Though the Justices have only now resolved the issue of API copyright, it was among the first of the legal problems with which FSF and I dealt. The heart of the free software movement?s long-term strategy was to harness the power of independent reinvention. Writing from scratch new programs that implemented both sides of all major software APIs was the technical pillar of our master plan. Licensing those programs on terms that protected the resulting commons?giving every user rights to study, copy, modify and share, with copyleft restriction on downstream licensing?was the legal pillar. The master plan of GNU was the independent reimplementation of both sides of all Unix APIs, thus allowing anything that could be done by general purpose computers to be done by software in which users had rights and free invention could flourish. When FSF and I started working together, in 1993, the Foundation?which was made possible by Richard Stallman?s 1990 MacArthur prize?was new, and the 1991 GPLv2 license brilliantly constructed for Stallman by Jerry Cohen was even newer. Gaining broad legal acceptance for GPLv2 and assessing the risk from the patenting of purely software inventions were immediate legal problems in need of my attention. But the threat posed by broad API copyright was the most urgent. The urgency arose because the issue was already headed for the US Supreme Court. Read more

Open Invention Network Legitimising More Software Patents (Instead of Fighting Them)

  • Open Invention Network expands Linux patent protection [Ed: IBM- and Microsoft-funded front -- fronting for OIN and Linux Foundation agenda -- continues to promote software patents agenda]

    Today, everyone -- yes, even Microsoft -- use Linux and open-source. It's been years since Linux was under attack by SCO for imaginary copyright violations, and then Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer claimed that Linux violated over 200 of Microsoft's patents. So over 15-years ago, the Open Invention Network (OIN) patent consortium was formed to defend Linux against intellectual property (IP) attacks. Even so, Linux and open-source software are still under attack from patent trolls and other attackers. That's where the Open Invention Network (OIN) steps up by expanding its patent non-aggression coverage by updating its Linux System definition.

  • Open Invention Network Expands its Patent Non-Aggression

    Open Invention Network (OIN), the largest patent non-aggression community in history, announced today that it has increased its patent non-aggression coverage through an update to its definition of the Linux System. To keep pace with innovation Open Invention Network regularly revises and expands its Linux System coverage. This is the ninth expansion of the software packages and libraries protected under the Open Invention Network cross license.

  • Open Invention Network expands coverage

    The Open Invention Network has announced an expansion of its "Linux System Definition", which is the set of software covered by its patent-protection umbrella.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Red Hat Insights Resource Optimization is released

    Last summer we released the public beta of the Resource Optimization service. During public beta, we received a lot of feedback from customers, which we used to enhance Resource Optimization in several areas. We are now announcing that this service is generally available for our Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) customers.

  • Automating DNS based GSLB with Infoblox DTC and Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform

    Companies are pushing data closer and closer to the edge to meet the demands of users who are increasingly sensitive to delays in application responsiveness. These changes to the way data is delivered and consumed presents challenges to IT organizations. In this post we'll talk about how an organization can provide optimum uptime while also delivering data as quickly as possible. An Application Delivery Controller (ADC) is one solution, but it often relies on expensive software and hardware to direct network traffic to available resources across datacenters. In addition to the traditional DNS infrastructure, an ADC solution often employs Global Server Load Balancing (GSLB) to dynamically reply to a Domain Name System (DNS) query with the IP address of the closest, or healthiest, server. Beyond the monetary cost of maintaining two separate DNS solutions, an ADC introduces another layer of complexity to a network.

  • Perform unit tests using GoogleTest and CTest [Ed: Several times in recent days Stephan Avenwedde promotes Microsoft vendor lock-in for developers]
  • Artificial Intelligence (AI): 7 trends to watch for in 2022

    Of the many technologies with the potential to deliver significant value in the near future, Artificial Intelligence (AI) seems firmly planted atop the list for CIOs. Indeed, nearly all (95 percent) of the CIOs, CTOs, and technology leaders surveyed by IEEE agreed that AI will drive the majority of innovation across almost every industry sector in the next one to five years. "In 2022, expect AI engagements to become larger, more strategically significant, and more mission-critical – with a focus on long-term scalability."

  • Future of work: A case for the 3-day weekend

    Since around 2010, the “future of work” has been a leading topic for business leaders, entrepreneurs, and employees. A key question has been how emerging technologies such as AI, robotics, and smart machines will affect humans in the workforce. Then COVID-19 struck. Seemingly overnight, orderly debates about the future of work morphed into chaotic discussions about the “present of work:” Specifically, could employees work securely using mature technologies like video conferencing, mobile telephony, and cloud computing services? Forced to shut down their physical offices, corporations resorted to work models predicated on what futurist Carmen Alfonso Rica called a “massive, forced adoption of remote working.”

  • Fedora Community Blog: Mindshare Committee Quarterly Report – Q4 2021

    The Mindshare Committee is establishing a Quarterly Report, with this post being our first edition. It covers activities from the Mindshare Committee and related teams for the months of October, November, and December of 2021. As we kick off these reports, we welcome feedback on how we can improve in the related Mindshare ticket.