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today's leftovers

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  • CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare" Plasma Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare", the Plasma edition and it is amazing.

  • CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare" Plasma

    Today we are looking at the amazing CarbonUI v1.0 "Flare", KDE Plasma release. This is their first stable release and WOW, I am truly impressed. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.14, KDE Plasma 5.22, based on Arch, and uses about 1.2GB of ram when idling. Enjoy!

  • Pinephone Pro: Mobile Linux To The Next Level - Invidious

    I've been thinking of buying a pinephoen for a while and seemingly out of nowhere the pinephone pro has been announced so let's have a look at what it's like

  • Five of Tuesday’s ‘All Things Open’ Presentations We Wouldn’t Miss

    Yesterday — just in case you were looking for something to do — we told you about five talks on Monday’s All Things Open schedule that we were planning on watching online (which we did, and they were even better than expected).

    Today, we’re doing the same with ATO’s Tuesday schedule, because hey, that’s just the way we roll. You might have noticed yesterday that we left the keynotes off our list, which we’re also doing today. The way we look at it is that if we have to tell you that you need to watch the keynotes, there’s not much we can do for you.

  • Windows, macOS or Linux, which one to choose [Ed: Relatively shallow article]

    Linux made its name for being an extremely versatile operating system, equipping everything from minicomputers like the Raspberry Pi to datacenters in the cloud, through devices that are in our daily lives, such as smart TVs, routers, thermostats, and the like, without even being suspicious. But what about home and personal use? How does the penguin system fare?

    The main difference between Linux in relation to Windows and macOS is that it is an open-source system. Therefore, it can be modified and improved by anyone who wants to collaborate on the project or make their own distribution. It is due to this characteristic that we see the system being implemented for so many purposes.

More in Tux Machines

Linus Torvalds Announces First Linux 5.17 Kernel Release Candidate

Linus Torvalds just announced today the first Release Candidate of Linux kernel 5.17, which looks to be a normal release with a normal amount of changes and new features. Nothing fancy, and nothing that stands out. There’s a little bit of everything for everyone. According to Linus Torvalds, the bulk of it is various driver updates, and there’s also architecture, documentation, and tooling updates. However, the random number generator work and the rewrite of the fscache persistent local cache tool stand out in the upcoming Linux 5.17 kernel series. Read more

Check Out GNOME Shell’s New Look in GNOME 42

GNOME Shell looks a little different in GNOME 42, which is currently in active development. I wasn’t able to showcase the shell theme tweaks in my GNOME 42 alpha post but, over the weekend, fuelled by coffee

Android Leftovers

Linux 5.17 Features From New AMD P-State To Xilinx Drivers, Lots Of New Hardware

This morning marked the release of Linux 5.17-rc1 that officially ends the merge window for this next stable kernel series. Linux 5.17 won't see its stable debut until around the end of March but there is a lot to get excited about for this open-source kernel in 2022. Linux 5.17 is exciting for mainlining the AMD P-State driver that has been under review/testing for the past several months in cooperation with Valve for the Steam Deck, initial Intel Raptor Lake bring-up bits, Intel Alder Lake P graphics being promoted to stable, lots of preparations for future AMD processors, initial support for the recently launched Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 1, many tablet / laptop support improvements, x86 straight line speculation mitigation support, support for a low-cost RISC-V platform, and a whole lot more. Read more