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today's leftovers

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  • OpenEmbedded Dunfell complete recompile

    But then I wondered if there might be any repercussions with other packages. Not sure, but decided to do a complete recompile in OpenEmbedded, the Dunfell release with my 'meta-quirky' layer.

    Very interesting how long it took this time. Started at 9.30am yesterday, and it finished about 2.00am this morning, that is circa 16 hours. This is on my Lenovo with i3 CPU, 32GB RAM and swap partition on an internal SSD. The build has taken place on an external usb3 SSD, which would probably be the main bottleneck.

    The external SSD is 1TB, and the build has consumed almost 280GB. That is just for the x86_64 build. I also have the aarch64 build on the SSD, which has consumed almost as much. That is why I need a 1TB drive!

    The build has taken longer due to more packages compiled. I have posted about the gradual addition of more packages, and this latest build is 839 packages. That is original packages, not split up into several smaller packages like Debian does.

  • A look at old desktop themes

    I am planning a new theme for EasyOS 3.1. The theme in 3.0 and earlier has been in use for a long time, really do need a change.

  • OK Lenovo, we need to talk!

    I’ve been wanting to publicly comment on Lenovo’s statement on Linux support for a while, as there’s much to say about it, and my failing attempt at finding a suitable replacement for my venerable T510 gave me an excuse to document my love-hate relationship with Lenovo all at once.

    This is of course my own personal views and ideas, and does not reflect the Haiku project’s position on the topic, nor that of Haiku, Inc. But I feel they deserve to be brought here due to history and the direct and indirect effect it might have had on the project, including previous failed attempts at commercial applications using it.

    While Lenovo is still above many other manufacturers on some aspects, and on others domains, well, nobody does any better anyway, they purport to perpetuating the IBM legacy, so I think (sic) they should be held up to the standard they claim to follow. Yet the discussion about repair and documentation pertains to almost every vendor.

    Also, it’s a long read, an hour or so, so make yourself comfortable, get a coffee, or tea and biscuits.

    Skip to the middle for the more political views on Right to repair, schematics and specifications, but you’d really be missing some history and facts for the subsequent discussion, and rants about the T510 and nvidia. If you just want to see me complain about current hardware just go further down.

  • The ELISA Project Continues to Grow its Global Ecosystem by Welcoming Red Hat as a Premier Member and Banma, Lotus Cars and SUSE - Linux Foundation

    Today, the ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) Project, an open source initiative that aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems, announced that it Red Hat has upgraded its membership to premier member and welcomes Banma, Lotus Cars and SUSE as the newest members.

    Linux is used in all major industries because it can enable faster time to market for new features and take advantage of the quality of the code development processes. Launched in February 2019 by the Linux Foundation, ELISA works with Linux kernel and safety communities to agree on what should be considered when Linux is to be used in safety-critical systems.

    “Linux underpins many applications today that have safety-critical and cybersecurity implications,” said Kate Stewart, Vice President of Dependable Embedded Systems at The Linux Foundation. “By collaborating together, the ELISA members are defining the best practices for use of Linux in these systems. We look forward to continuing to build consensus and welcoming expertise and collaboration from these new members.”

  • The ELISA Project Continues to Grow its Global Ecosystem by Welcoming Red Hat as a Premier member and Banma, Lotus Cars and SUSE

    Today, the ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) Project, an open source initiative that aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems, announced that Red Hat has upgraded its membership to premier member and welcomes Banma, Lotus Cars and SUSE as the newest members.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Late Night Linux, Destination Linux, and More

Kernel: Slowdown, CephFS, and FS-Cache / CacheFiles

  • How a performance boost in Linux kernel for one family of Intel chips slowed its latest Alder Lake processors

    The mixture of performance and efficiency CPUs in Intel’s 12th-gen Core processors, code-named Alder Lake, hasn’t just been causing problems for some Windows gamers – it almost led to complications for Linux. Phoronix’s Michael Larabel noticed a performance hit in the kernel a fortnight ago – in a work-in-progress release candidate, we should stress – and a fix for the scheduling code landed a little later. It turned out the kernel suffered on Alder Lake chips due to a performance-enhancing tweak for another Intel processor family: the multiple-Atom-core-based Jacobsville. This year, Intel officially canned its Lakefield chips. These consisted of a performance core called Sunny Cove as well as Atom-class efficiency cores dubbed Tremont. Crucially, there are still multi-Tremont-core embedded processors out there, such as Snow Ridge. These are server and infrastructure-oriented components with up to 24 cores. The first proposed cut of kernel 5.16, specifically 5.16-rc1, contained a revision to the scheduler that makes it aware that some clusters of cores share a block of L2 cache – as seen in Snow Ridge and Jacobsville.

  • Testing the Linux Kernel CephFS Client with xfstests

    I do a lot of testing with the kernel cephfs client these days, and have had a number of people ask about how I test it. For now, I’ll gloss over the cluster setup since there are other tutorials for that.

  • Major Rewrite Of Linux's FS-Cache / CacheFiles So It's Smaller & Simpler - Phoronix

    As part of David Howells of Red Hat long-term work on improving the caching code used by network file-systems, he today posted a big patch series rewriting the fscache and cachefiles code as the latest significant step on that adventure. Howells posted a set of 64 patches for rewriting the kernel's fscache and cachefiles code. Linux's fsache is a general purpose cache used by network file-systems while cachefiles is for providing a caching back-end for mounted local file-systems. The Red Hat engineer has been working on this rewrite for more than the past year.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter and Ubuntu Desktop on Google Clown

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 711

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 711 for the week of November 21 – 27, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Launch Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud

    This tutorial shows you how to set up a Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud. If you need a graphic interface to your virtual desktop on the cloud, this tutorial will teach you how to set up a desktop environment just like what you can get on your own computer.

Open Hardware/Modding: ESP32, 3-D Printing, Raspberry Pi Pico, PocketBeagle

  • Wireless thermal printer kit features M5Stack ATOM Lite controller - CNX Software

    This is certainly not the first ESP32 thermal printer solution, as there are various implementations including bitbank2 thermal printer Arduino connecting ESP32 and nRF52 boards to the printer over Bluetotoh LE, or a Arduino sketches to print bitmaps over serial or MQTT.

  • Generate Fully Parametric, 3D-Printable Speaker Enclosures | Hackaday

    Having the right speaker enclosure can make a big difference to sound quality, so it’s no surprise that customizable ones are a common project for those who treat sound seriously. In that vein, [zx82net]’s Universal Speaker Box aims to give one everything they need to craft the perfect enclosure.

  • Z80 Video Output Via The Raspberry Pi Pico | Hackaday

    Building basic computers from the ground up is a popular pastime in the hacker community. [Kevin] is one such enthusiast, and decided to whip up a video interface for his retro Z80 machine.

  • The Calculator Charm: Calculatorium Leviosa! | Hackaday

    Have you ever tried waving your hand around like a magic wand and summoning a calculator? We would guess not since you’d probably look a little silly doing so. That is unless you had [Andrei’s] cool gesture-controlled calculator. [Andrei] thought it would be helpful to use a calculator in his research lab without having to take his gloves off and the results are pretty cool. His hardware consists of a PocketBeagle, an OLED, and an MPU6050 inertial measurement unit for capturing his hand motions using an accelerometer and gyroscope. The hardware is pretty straightforward, so the beauty of this project lies in its machine learning implementation.