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Mozilla: Six-Year Moziversary, Thomas Park/Codepip, and Weak Response to Critics of Firefox Spyware

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Moz/FF
  • Chris H-C: Six-Year Moziversary

    I’ve been working at Mozilla for six years today. Wow.

    Okay, so what’s happened… I’ve been promoted to Staff Software Engineer. Georg and I’d been working on that before he left, and then, well *gestures at everything*. This means it doesn’t really _feel_ that different to be a Staff instead of a Senior since I’ve been operating at the latter level for over a year now, but the it’s nice that the title caught up. Next stop: well, actually, I think Staff’s a good place for now.

    Firefox On Glean did indeed take my entire 2020 at work, and did complete on time and on budget. Glean is now available to be used in Firefox Desktop.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Hacks Decoded: Thomas Park, Founder of Codepip

    Thomas Park is a software developer based in the U.S. (Philadelphia, specifically). Previously, he was a teacher and researcher at Drexel University and even worked at Mozilla Foundation for a stint. Now, he’s the founder of Codepip, a platform that offers games that teach players how to code. Park has made a couple games himself: Flexbox Froggy and Grid Garden.

  • Mark Surman: Exploring better data stewardship at Mozilla [Ed: Mozilla fails to admit that spying on Firefox users is wrong; now it's misframing the criticism and responds to a straw man]

    Over the last few years, Mozilla has increasingly turned its attention to the question of ‘how we build more trustworthy AI?’ Data is at the core of this question. Who has our data? What are they using it for? Do they have my interests in mind, or only their own? Do I trust them?

    We decided earlier this year that ‘better data stewardship’ should be one of the three big areas of focus for our trustworthy AI work.

    One part of this focus is supporting the growing field of people working on data trusts, data cooperatives and other efforts to build trust and shift power dynamics around data. In partnership with Luminate and Siegel, we launched the Mozilla Data Futures Lab in March as a way to drive this part of the work.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Late Night Linux, Destination Linux, and More

Kernel: Slowdown, CephFS, and FS-Cache / CacheFiles

  • How a performance boost in Linux kernel for one family of Intel chips slowed its latest Alder Lake processors

    The mixture of performance and efficiency CPUs in Intel’s 12th-gen Core processors, code-named Alder Lake, hasn’t just been causing problems for some Windows gamers – it almost led to complications for Linux. Phoronix’s Michael Larabel noticed a performance hit in the kernel a fortnight ago – in a work-in-progress release candidate, we should stress – and a fix for the scheduling code landed a little later. It turned out the kernel suffered on Alder Lake chips due to a performance-enhancing tweak for another Intel processor family: the multiple-Atom-core-based Jacobsville. This year, Intel officially canned its Lakefield chips. These consisted of a performance core called Sunny Cove as well as Atom-class efficiency cores dubbed Tremont. Crucially, there are still multi-Tremont-core embedded processors out there, such as Snow Ridge. These are server and infrastructure-oriented components with up to 24 cores. The first proposed cut of kernel 5.16, specifically 5.16-rc1, contained a revision to the scheduler that makes it aware that some clusters of cores share a block of L2 cache – as seen in Snow Ridge and Jacobsville.

  • Testing the Linux Kernel CephFS Client with xfstests

    I do a lot of testing with the kernel cephfs client these days, and have had a number of people ask about how I test it. For now, I’ll gloss over the cluster setup since there are other tutorials for that.

  • Major Rewrite Of Linux's FS-Cache / CacheFiles So It's Smaller & Simpler - Phoronix

    As part of David Howells of Red Hat long-term work on improving the caching code used by network file-systems, he today posted a big patch series rewriting the fscache and cachefiles code as the latest significant step on that adventure. Howells posted a set of 64 patches for rewriting the kernel's fscache and cachefiles code. Linux's fsache is a general purpose cache used by network file-systems while cachefiles is for providing a caching back-end for mounted local file-systems. The Red Hat engineer has been working on this rewrite for more than the past year.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter and Ubuntu Desktop on Google Clown

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 711

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 711 for the week of November 21 – 27, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Launch Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud

    This tutorial shows you how to set up a Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud. If you need a graphic interface to your virtual desktop on the cloud, this tutorial will teach you how to set up a desktop environment just like what you can get on your own computer.

Open Hardware/Modding: ESP32, 3-D Printing, Raspberry Pi Pico, PocketBeagle

  • Wireless thermal printer kit features M5Stack ATOM Lite controller - CNX Software

    This is certainly not the first ESP32 thermal printer solution, as there are various implementations including bitbank2 thermal printer Arduino connecting ESP32 and nRF52 boards to the printer over Bluetotoh LE, or a Arduino sketches to print bitmaps over serial or MQTT.

  • Generate Fully Parametric, 3D-Printable Speaker Enclosures | Hackaday

    Having the right speaker enclosure can make a big difference to sound quality, so it’s no surprise that customizable ones are a common project for those who treat sound seriously. In that vein, [zx82net]’s Universal Speaker Box aims to give one everything they need to craft the perfect enclosure.

  • Z80 Video Output Via The Raspberry Pi Pico | Hackaday

    Building basic computers from the ground up is a popular pastime in the hacker community. [Kevin] is one such enthusiast, and decided to whip up a video interface for his retro Z80 machine.

  • The Calculator Charm: Calculatorium Leviosa! | Hackaday

    Have you ever tried waving your hand around like a magic wand and summoning a calculator? We would guess not since you’d probably look a little silly doing so. That is unless you had [Andrei’s] cool gesture-controlled calculator. [Andrei] thought it would be helpful to use a calculator in his research lab without having to take his gloves off and the results are pretty cool. His hardware consists of a PocketBeagle, an OLED, and an MPU6050 inertial measurement unit for capturing his hand motions using an accelerometer and gyroscope. The hardware is pretty straightforward, so the beauty of this project lies in its machine learning implementation.