Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Deploy a Java application using Helm, Part 2 | Red Hat Developer

    In the previous article in this series, you learned how to deploy Java applications to Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP) using Helm on Red Hat OpenShift. Developers can use the procedures in Part 1 to easily stand up traditional Java application servers on Kubernetes with predefined Kubernetes manifestos.

    What if you could have the same benefits when you develop microservices using JBoss EAP and Helm charts? JBoss EAP provides the Extension Pack (XP) to implement content trimming, packaging to a bootable JAR, and a MicroProfile specification including fault tolerance, monitoring, and tracing in support of microservices in the cloud. This article explains how to make a bootable JAR using JBoss EAP XP and Helm and deploy the application to OpenShift.

  • Red Hat build of Quarkus 2.2: Simplified Kubernetes-native Java

    Red Hat has released the Red Hat build of Quarkus 2.2 to continue to support enterprise developers building Kubernetes-native Java applications. The latest release has many great features and performance improvements, including tools to improve developer productivity while in Dev Mode.

    Let's take a look at some highlights from this release. For a complete list, check out the release notes.

  • What's new in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.9 console

    Red Hat OpenShift console users will discover a rich set of new and improved console features in OpenShift 4.9. This article introduces general improvements, usability enhancements, and new console features for developers using Red Hat OpenShift Serverless, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, and Red Hat OpenShift GitOps.

  • DevOps: 3 skills needed to support its future in the enterprise

    It’s no longer a question of if organizations need DevOps, but rather when they should adopt it, according to the DevOps Institute Upskilling 2021 report. That report finds that global enterprise adoption of DevOps at the project or multiple-project level is at 20 percent and 36 percent, respectively – and the skills needed for a successful DevOps journey span the categories of automation, human, technical, functional, and process knowledge.

    Whether you’re facing a skills gap in any of those key areas or you’re looking to expand your adoption of DevOps in the near future, keep the following considerations in mind:

  • Productivity lessons learned: 6 CIOs share tips for you and your team

    In our new hybrid work reality, many people in IT have enjoyed the flexibility to rewrite the rules on work-life balance. But it’s been a learning curve, says Kumud Kalia, CIO, Guardant Health.

    “As we moved to remote working for most of our employees, it became evident that time management had become much more of a juggling act between work, childcare/schooling, and miscellaneous personal priorities without a clear separation between these various activities. We already had flexible working hours for many of our employees, but we found that Zoom fatigue was real and added to the already unrelenting demands upon our people,” says Kalia.

    We asked CIOs who recently won the 2021 Bay Area CIO of the Year ORBIE Awards for their best productivity tips and lessons learned on work-life balance over the last year and a half. The awards were presented by the Bay Area CIO Leadership Association, a professional community that annually recognizes CIOs for their excellence in technology leadership.

    From being intentional and selective, to setting the right examples from the top, learn how these award-winning CIOs are making the most of their workday - and encouraging their teams to do the same.

  • Docker and Fedora 35

    In June of 2020, we published an article related to running Docker and Fedora 32. We described various workarounds that were required to run Docker, and we explained the bothersome situation at that time. But Docker has evolved, and it’s time to return to our previous tutorial. Thus, today we’ll talk about using Docker on Fedora Linux 35.

    With this guide, you should be able to easily recreate an existing development environment, without having to retool your entire pipeline. We’ll focus on getting the right packages, testing a few important scenarios, and helping you with tooling.

More in Tux Machines

Garuda Linux: All-Rounder Distro Based on Arch Linux

A review of the Arch Linux based Garuda Linux, which brings a collection of desktop environments, window managers, and tools for general users and gamers. Read more

Plex Desktop Player is Now Available for Linux

In fact, it is also one of the best media server software for Linux. Yes, the media server was already available for Linux, and we also had a tutorial covering the installation steps. Read more

3 Top Free and Open Source D Web Frameworks

A web framework offers the developer a choice about how to solve a specific problem. By using a framework, a developer lets the framework control portions of their application. While it’s perfectly possible to code a web application without using a framework, it’s more practical to use one. D is a general-purpose systems programming language with a C-like syntax that compiles to native code. It is statically typed and supports both automatic (garbage collected) and manual memory management. D programs are structured as modules that can be compiled separately and linked with external libraries to create native libraries or executables. Here’s our recommendations. We only feature open source software. Read more

10 Cheap Raspberry Pi Alternatives in 2022

The Raspberry Pi is the king of single-board computers because it offers decent performance packed into a convenient form factor for an attractive price. But its competition hasn’t been asleep while it’s been sitting on the throne. In 2022, there are several cheap Raspberry Pi alternatives that you should consider for your projects, each offering a unique set of features and capabilities. So, without further ado, here’s our list of the best cheap Raspberry Pi alternatives in 2022. Update notice: The first version of this article was published in 2020. Since then, several compelling Raspberry Pi alternatives have been released, and the best ones are included in this updated version. Read more