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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • Linux IP Command with Usage Examples

    The IP command is part of iproute package that is by default installed in Modern Linux distributions. In Linux, the IP command is used to manage and display Network Interfaces, IP Addresses, IP Routing Table, and IP Neighbor Entries. It is commonly used to assign an IP address to a network interface and configure network interface settings.

    In this tutorial, we will learn Linux IP command with usage examples.

  • Jenkins: An introduction to jobs and projects - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will explain what a Jenkins job (or project) is and discuss the different types you may encounter. There are many types available, and it depends on the plugins that you have installed. First, however, this guide will discuss the main types that you will encounter.

  • How to create an RDS cluster on AWS

    AWS RDS (Relational Database Service) is a managed database service provided by AWS to launch highly available, fault-tolerant, automatic failover, and scalable database servers as AWS RDS is a managed service, so it does not provide the shell access to the server. You only get the connection endpoint to connect to the database. AWS RDS provides the following benefits over a self-managed database server.

  • How to Deal with Spaces in File Path Linux

    Using Linux operating system and facing problems while dealing with the spaces in file path? Many Linux users encounter this issue. In the Linux operating system, we can run commands by passing multiple arguments. A space separates each argument. So, if we give the path that has a space, it will be considered two different arguments instead of one a single path.

    In this article, we will dive deeper into how to deal with spaces in file path Linux? But, before that, we need to know the ls command, the uses of the ls command, the syntax for writing the command on the terminal.

  • How can I see all services in Ubuntu?

    System services are the processes or system programs known as ‘daemons’ that continuously run in the background. These services wait for client requests and are responsible for how the system works and how it communicates with other programs. When working in a Linux environment, including Ubuntu, you can easily manage all system services (start, stop, restart, enable at system boot, etc.) through a service manager. Most of the modern Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu, now use a process manager known as ‘systemd’. The systemd is a service manager in the Ubuntu system and used to replace the ‘init’ process. The systemd services manager is controlled by the primary command-line tool ‘systemctl’ command.

    We will show you the various techniques in this tutorial related to listing or viewing all services in the Ubuntu 20.04 system.

  • How do I Copy Multiple Files Using CP in Linux

    CP allows you to copy directories and command files using the command line. With this command, you can transfer multiple files or folders, preserve attribute information and create their backups. CP copies file independently from their originals. So, we can say that the CP command is useful for Linux. People still don’t know how to use this command and search for answers regarding copying multiple files using CP in Linux. That’s why we have written this article to briefly describe how to copy multiple files using CP in Linux.

  • Find Processes Using Most CPU Linux

    Many times such situations come in Linux where we have to deal with application unresponsiveness or sluggish applications due to CPU usage. This happens when our Linux system CPU is very busy. Most of the time, it has to wait until the CPU is free and queue up to process its pending requests.

    Whenever the CPU is completely occupied by the processes of the Linux system, it becomes difficult for the CPU to process other requests. All remaining requests have to be stopped until the CPU is freed. This becomes a huge obstacle.

    We have to use the appropriate command to know the processes which are affecting the CPU. In this article, we will tell how we can solve CPU-related problems with the help of the following commands, as well as see how to find those processes which are using most CPU Linux.

  • Detect SQL Injection (SQLi) and XSS - blackMORE Ops

    LibInjection is a C library to Detect SQL Injection (SQLi) and Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) through lexical analysis of real-world Attacks.

    SQLi and other injection attacks remain the top OWASP and CERT vulnerability. Current detection attempts frequently involve a myriad of regular expressions which are not only brittle and error-prone but also proven by Hanson and Patterson at Black Hat 2005 to never be a complete solution. LibInjection is a new open-source C library that detects SQLi using lexical analysis. With little upfront knowledge of what SQLi is, the algorithm has been trained on tens of thousands of real SQLi attacks and hundreds of millions of user inputs taken from a Top 50 website for high precision and accuracy.

  • Diagnose connectivity issues with the Linux ping command | Opensource.com

    Networked computers are so common these days that most of us take it for granted that a computer on one side of a room can contact one on the other side of the room, much less the other side of the world. When it works as designed, networking is what makes the Internet, the cloud, file shares, media streaming, remote administration, printing, and much more possible. When something goes wrong, it can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. One of the most fundamental diagnostic tools for networked connectivity is the ping command.

More in Tux Machines

Videos: Ubuntu, Red Hat, and Lutris/WINE

Programming Leftovers

  • [Older] Report: Software engineers have only 10 hours per week for ‘deep work’

    What are software engineers spending their time on? With talent shortages at an all-time high, and epic shifts in where and how we work, everybody wants to know how happy engineers are with their jobs. A new report conducted by Retool and Wakefield uncovered insights into how engineers save time, increase productivity, where they lose time and their preferences around how that time is spent. Engineers are splitting time between core coding responsibilities, communication processes, complex testing, and even assisting with hiring, leaving them with only around 10 hours of “deep work” time per week. To save time, engineers are turning to open source code more than ever. Almost 90% of the engineers surveyed view open source code as at least somewhat essential to their day to day. More than 80% of developers are actively pulling open source code into their work (via StackOverflow or otherwise) at least once per month, and almost 50% are doing it at least once per week.

  • How Software Engineers Spend Their Time

    Almost 90% of the engineers surveyed view open source code as at least somewhat essential to their day to day.

  • hm-panelizer - A KiCad companion GUI tool for panelizing PCBs - CNX Software

    Gerard (aka halfmarble) has released hm-panelizer open-source software allowing for a panelization of PCBs via a simple GUI interface and doubling as a Gerber file viewer. He’s mostly tested it with PCBs designed in KiCad 6.x, but it should also work with design files from other tools.

  • 3 practical tips for agile transformation

    Agile transformation happens at three levels: team agile, product agile, and organization agile. Helping your team convert to agile is the first and fundamental step in agile transformation, and with good reason. Until you get your people on board with agile, the product of all their hard work can't be agile.

  • Calculating the ROI of Commercial Qt Subscriptions

    Calculating the financial value of software is not trivial, but it's not rocket science. Have you ever been in the position to justify your software purchase to your CFO or the procurement team? I've been doing this many times throughout my career in different product management and R&D leadership roles. The MAKE or BUY decision is often on the table. We at the Qt Company want to help current and future customers turn the benefits of using Qt's commercial software into financial outcomes. Therefore, we developed a tool that calculates the ROI of using the different parts of our portfolio and helps to surface current challenges and their business impact. In the past, I’ve been using Microsoft Excel to do the math of how much money we can save and how much additional money we can make by using a particular software. Using Excel in a world of cloud-based solutions felt a bit outdated, and we decided to build the new Qt Value Assessment Tool on an interactive web-based platform.

  • Embedded Linux development on Ubuntu – Part II | Ubuntu

    Welcome to Part II of this three-part mini-series on embedded Linux development on Ubuntu. In Part I, we set the stage for the remainder of the series and gave an overview of snaps, the packaging format at the heart of embedded devices running Ubuntu. Snaps are a secure, confined, dependency-free, cross-platform Linux packaging format. Software publishers often want to manage their application components using containers. Whereas one can achieve this with various runtimes, the Snap ecosystem provides a security-focused approach to containerisation with strict privilege and capability separation between containers. If you missed it, head over to Part I to review the role of snaps in embedded Linux development. If you are already familiar with snaps and do not wish to refresh your memory, keep reading.

  • Translating Jenkins with Perl | Alceu Rodrigues de Freitas Junior [blogs.perl.org]

    This is my first post here and I hope it is more positive than a rant to the readers eyes... It was 2017 when I had installed Jenkins locally in my notebook for a series of experiments. The notebook was running Ubuntu configured in Brazilian Portuguese and Jenkins automatically presented me with a translation to my native language. After 15 minutes trying, I changed Ubuntu settings to English and never went back. It took me a while to jump into the project repository and start translating the missing parts, about four years... and the translation hasn't improved since. You might be asking yourself what this has to do with Perl and why I'm blogging about it here... well, Jenkins project uses (at least) since 2010 a Perl script to help with the translation work.

Security Leftovers

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 214 released
    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 214. This version includes the following changes:
    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Support both python-argcomplete 1.x and 2.x.
    
    [ Vagrant Cascadian ]
    * Add external tool on GNU Guix for xb-tool.
    
  • Security updates for Friday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (atftp, cups, neutron, and zipios++), Fedora (clash, moodle, python-jwt, and thunderbird), Red Hat (thunderbird), Slackware (cups), SUSE (go1.17, libredwg, opera, seamonkey, and varnish), and Ubuntu (libxv, ncurses, openssl, and subversion).

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