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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • IBM Proposing A CPU Namespace For The Linux Kernel

    IBM engineer Pratik Sampat published an early prototype of a CPU namespace interface for the Linux kernel. This CPU namespace was devised to address coherency issues with current means of viewing available CPU resources as well as addressing possible security issues stemming from understanding resource access/positioning on the system.

  • MontaVista Announces Multiple Tier1 Customers Adopting MVShield for Commercial Support of CentOS and Rocky Linux

    MontaVista® Software, LLC, a leader in commercial Embedded Linux® products and services, today announced that several Tier1 customers across the enterprise markets serviced by MontaVista, have selected MVShield because of its capabilities to offer Long-Term Support for CentOS with telecom grade features such as redundancy, high availability and high throughput with low latency.

  • Red Hat Bolsters Cloud-Native and Edge Portfolio

    Red Hat today at the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America conference unfurled a bevy of updates that promise to both make it easier to build and deploy applications on fleets of clusters based on its distribution of Kubernetes and manage the overall environment.

  • Software’s Big Skill-Up, Learning The Way To Cloud-Native

    In this regard, Red Hat is providing ways for cloud-native deployments to be executed more quickly and accurately. Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes 2.4 provides ‘policy templating’ (a policy being the prescripted way data is managed in any given system) and zero-touch provisioning. Of particular use in edge i.e. Internet of Things (IoT) computing environments, Red Hat also here combines what the company calls ‘validated patterns for edge’ to reduce deployment complexity, save time and improve the accuracy of the cloud-native systems being developed.

  • Automotive transformation to software-defined vehicles: Red Hat point of view and synergies with state-of-the-art IT

    Building a dream car doesn’t just revolve around factors like horsepower and interior finishes anymore. The automotive industry is going through some big changes as the electric vehicle market revs up and edge computing extends new capabilities for vehicle connectivity.

    At Red Hat, we are working to enable a number of edge use cases—from telecommunications use cases with core network infrastructure for radio access networks to distributed computing for retail environments and manufacturing environments.

    During the "Automotive transformation to software-defined vehicles" Ask the Expert session at Red Hat Summit this year, we discussed the car as the ultimate edge server and the role of Red Hat and other open source contributors in this fast-evolving industry. This post will cover some of the highlights from the session.

  • Remote and hybrid work: 4 tips to ease onboarding

    Onboarding new team members has been a struggle for many companies that rapidly switched to remote work or hybrid work. As an IT leader, you know that business success depends on having reliable and talented colleagues working together, whether virtually or in person. So how do you overcome the remote onboarding challenge?

    Answering this question can be particularly difficult if yours is a "traditional" industry with a baked-in corporate culture. A company that’s been in the financial services industry for 100 years, for instance, is likely to have a tougher time revamping its onboarding processes than, say, a start-up that specializes in cloud services.

    That’s not corporate ageism; it’s a trend that's been seen time and time again – and it will, unfortunately, inhibit your ability to onboard talented developers and other technologists with a diversity of backgrounds and experience.

    The good news? Any organization, in any industry, can successfully “virtualize” its onboarding practices. In doing so, they invigorate their IT teams and add collaborative, innovative people.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Late Night Linux, Destination Linux, and More

Kernel: Slowdown, CephFS, and FS-Cache / CacheFiles

  • How a performance boost in Linux kernel for one family of Intel chips slowed its latest Alder Lake processors

    The mixture of performance and efficiency CPUs in Intel’s 12th-gen Core processors, code-named Alder Lake, hasn’t just been causing problems for some Windows gamers – it almost led to complications for Linux. Phoronix’s Michael Larabel noticed a performance hit in the kernel a fortnight ago – in a work-in-progress release candidate, we should stress – and a fix for the scheduling code landed a little later. It turned out the kernel suffered on Alder Lake chips due to a performance-enhancing tweak for another Intel processor family: the multiple-Atom-core-based Jacobsville. This year, Intel officially canned its Lakefield chips. These consisted of a performance core called Sunny Cove as well as Atom-class efficiency cores dubbed Tremont. Crucially, there are still multi-Tremont-core embedded processors out there, such as Snow Ridge. These are server and infrastructure-oriented components with up to 24 cores. The first proposed cut of kernel 5.16, specifically 5.16-rc1, contained a revision to the scheduler that makes it aware that some clusters of cores share a block of L2 cache – as seen in Snow Ridge and Jacobsville.

  • Testing the Linux Kernel CephFS Client with xfstests

    I do a lot of testing with the kernel cephfs client these days, and have had a number of people ask about how I test it. For now, I’ll gloss over the cluster setup since there are other tutorials for that.

  • Major Rewrite Of Linux's FS-Cache / CacheFiles So It's Smaller & Simpler - Phoronix

    As part of David Howells of Red Hat long-term work on improving the caching code used by network file-systems, he today posted a big patch series rewriting the fscache and cachefiles code as the latest significant step on that adventure. Howells posted a set of 64 patches for rewriting the kernel's fscache and cachefiles code. Linux's fsache is a general purpose cache used by network file-systems while cachefiles is for providing a caching back-end for mounted local file-systems. The Red Hat engineer has been working on this rewrite for more than the past year.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter and Ubuntu Desktop on Google Clown

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 711

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 711 for the week of November 21 – 27, 2021. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Launch Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud

    This tutorial shows you how to set up a Ubuntu Desktop on Google Cloud. If you need a graphic interface to your virtual desktop on the cloud, this tutorial will teach you how to set up a desktop environment just like what you can get on your own computer.

Open Hardware/Modding: ESP32, 3-D Printing, Raspberry Pi Pico, PocketBeagle

  • Wireless thermal printer kit features M5Stack ATOM Lite controller - CNX Software

    This is certainly not the first ESP32 thermal printer solution, as there are various implementations including bitbank2 thermal printer Arduino connecting ESP32 and nRF52 boards to the printer over Bluetotoh LE, or a Arduino sketches to print bitmaps over serial or MQTT.

  • Generate Fully Parametric, 3D-Printable Speaker Enclosures | Hackaday

    Having the right speaker enclosure can make a big difference to sound quality, so it’s no surprise that customizable ones are a common project for those who treat sound seriously. In that vein, [zx82net]’s Universal Speaker Box aims to give one everything they need to craft the perfect enclosure.

  • Z80 Video Output Via The Raspberry Pi Pico | Hackaday

    Building basic computers from the ground up is a popular pastime in the hacker community. [Kevin] is one such enthusiast, and decided to whip up a video interface for his retro Z80 machine.

  • The Calculator Charm: Calculatorium Leviosa! | Hackaday

    Have you ever tried waving your hand around like a magic wand and summoning a calculator? We would guess not since you’d probably look a little silly doing so. That is unless you had [Andrei’s] cool gesture-controlled calculator. [Andrei] thought it would be helpful to use a calculator in his research lab without having to take his gloves off and the results are pretty cool. His hardware consists of a PocketBeagle, an OLED, and an MPU6050 inertial measurement unit for capturing his hand motions using an accelerometer and gyroscope. The hardware is pretty straightforward, so the beauty of this project lies in its machine learning implementation.