Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Powers New PiCam Carrier Board

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Users of Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 boards who want to use the official Raspberry Pi Camera Module are left with a number of choices. Do they use the dedicated IO board or another carrier board? The latter is a popular option as the dedicated IO board is designed for development rather than daily use. We found Ledato's new PiCam module listed for $40 on Adafruit, and it looks like just the thing for CM4 camera projects.

The PiCam module is the same size as the Compute Module (sold separately), and can be mounted directly on top of the board via four M2.5 screw points, with just a small offset to assemble a very small Raspberry Pi camera system, perfect for adding computer vision in small places. The Raspberry Pi 4, and the Compute Module 4 offer decent machine learning / computer vision using TensorFlow Lite, so a carrier board such as PiCam offers embedded machine learning projects a little more power over higher priced alternatives.

Read more

Also: RPi CM4 carrier with camera connector sells for $40

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?

Linuxfx 11.1 WxDesktop 11.0.3

It is with great pleasure that we announce the release of Linuxfx version 11.1.1103. This update releases several new features for the operating system. The system kernel has been updated to version 5.13, bringing better support for more modern hardware. System tools gained new translations: French, German, Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, American and Portuguese is now supported for WxDesktop. Android support has been improved, now in addition to supporting opengl, we also release support for Vulkan (experimental). Finally, all system packages have been updated, including WxDesktop, Onlyoffice and many others. The image has been scaled down to fit on a DVD. Users of older versions will receive this update over the internet. New users can download the new image from our portal. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: TLLTS, Going Linux, and FLOSS Weekly

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 939

    Joel aint got no time for outlook! He is too busy working jenkins.

  • Going Linux #417 · A Tribute To Tom

    We remember former co-host, Tom with a re-broadcast of Tom at his best in episode 180, Listener Feedback and an interview with Jonathan Nadeau.

  • FLOSS Weekly 664: Tailscale - Avery Pennarun, VPN

    Avery Pennarun of Tailscale and much more, blows the minds of Doc Searls and Aaron Newcomb on a can't-miss show that explains how the best development is all "chickens and eggs." Pennarun explains thatfree software and open source is the gifting nature of the former, and how startups succeed and fail at crossing chasms. All while touching on so much more that we now have a Part 2 of the discussion planned.

Android Leftovers