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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How To Install Munin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Munin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Munin is a web-based tool to monitor system and network statistics. Munin shows this information through Graphs. It helps the system administrators to collect various system information that can be viewed via a web interface such as processor load, hard disk usage, network traffic, access to server services on one or more computers, and more.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Munin server monitoring on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Install Ruby on Rails on Debian 11

    Ruby on Rails is a free, open-source, and one of the most popular application stacks used for creating sites and web apps. It is written in Ruby programming language and follows the MVC concept. It comes with the Rails development framework that makes app development easier. There are many well-known applications based on Rails, such as Github, Airbnb, Soundcloud, etc.

    In this tutorial, I will show you how to install Ruby on Rails on a Debian 11 system.

  • How to Install Python 3.9 on Rocky Linux 8

    Python is a programming language that can be used to create just about anything. From full-scale games to web applications, and even simple scripts for your PC or Mac. Python has been around since the late 1980s and continues to be one of the most popular languages in use today.
    Today’s tutorial will show you how to install Python 3.9 programming language on a Rocky Linux 8 system.

  • How to Install Yarn JS (Node) Package Manager on Debian 11 – VITUX

    Yarn is a package manager for Javascript. It is meant to replace npm (node package manager). Yarn uses a different way to install packages. Instead of installing from the registry, it installs packages from other nodes in your network that have already downloaded the package and its dependencies. This can speed up installations, especially in projects with lots of node modules.

    Yarn works exactly the same as npm, but with some benefits. First of all, it tells you which version of a package that was installed is compatible with your project. This makes it easier if you need to roll back or update packages. Secondly, it makes your packages more secure. Every package’s checksum is validated before it’s run by Yarn. This means that if a developer installs an outdated or corrupted package, Yarn will be able to detect the error, show the error in an easy-to-read format, and allow them to correct it before executing the code.
    It isn’t easy to say whether the yarn is better than npm or vice versa. It’s just different. If you want an easy-to-use package manager that makes your packages more secure, the yarn might be the answer.

    If you are a developer, chances are you have heard of Yarn. Installing yarn on Debian 11 can be tricky if you’re unfamiliar with the process, but this tutorial will walk you through the process step-by-step so that after reading this post, installing Yarn should be as easy as 1-2-3!

  • How to Record Your Desktop Screen in Ubuntu 21.10 Wayland with Kooha | UbuntuHandbook

    Looking for how to record Ubuntu desktop in Wayland session? Here’s how to do it in Ubuntu 21.10 using Kooha.

    Ubuntu switched to “Wayland” session since Ubuntu 21.04. However, many apps, e.g., Kazam, Peek and vokoscreen-NG, do not support it. Some apps including OBS-Studio claim to support for Wayland, but either record blank screen or just refuse to work!

    The best solution in my opinion is switch back to Xorg session. To do so, simply log out, select your user and then choose “Ubuntu on Xorg” via bottom-right gear button menu. All the apps will work once you login with Xorg.

    For those sticking to the default Wayland, Kooha is one of good choices until GNOME’s “in-shell” screenshot & screencast UI is out.

  • How to configure automatic updates in Ubuntu Server - blackMORE Ops

    This guide explains how to configure automatic updates in Ubuntu Server 20.04. This tutorial is based on the following official Ubuntu Documentation article: Ubuntu Server Guide » Package Management » Automatic Updates. If you just want to do it, scroll down to the end and copy paste the two configuration file configs and you’re done. If you want to understand it and tweak, then keep reading.

  • How to create an Application Load Balancer on AWS

    Load Balancer falls under the EC2 services of AWS. An Application Load Balancer works at the seventh layer of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model, the application layer. We can add and remove targets from our load balancer as per our needs without affecting the flow of requests to the application. Application Load Balancer supports for path-based routing: forward requests based on the URL in the request, host-based routing: forward requests based on the host field in the HTTP header, routing based on fields in the request, registering targets by IP address: targets outside the VPC for the load balancer can also be added. These are a few of the benefits of using the Application Load Balancer.

  • How to edit files inside Docker container? - blackMORE Ops

    Just migrating everything to bunch of new RaspberryPi 4 8GB from my VMware farm. Instead of using multiple Raspberry Pi 4, I decided to use Docker and move as many I can into each one of these. I’ve think Home Assistant (with supervisor), Pi-Hole, Pi-VPN, UnBound and my NoIP2 scripts one Raspberry Pi4 8GB Pi running Debian 11 BullsEye and docker and Plex Server onto another Pi should do the trick. Anyhow, ran into an interesting problem with Undound where I needed to edit the configuration file nano application.yaml or vi unbound.sh and it said, nano or vi wasn’t installed.

  • Configuring TACACS+ Server With A Simple GUI | Linux Journal

    Managing authentication and authorization in a large-scale network is a challenge: the passwords need to be set and rotated every now and then, access to certain configuration settings needs to be controlled and, finally, users’ actions need to be logged somewhere. This poses a need for a centralized controller in the network that is responsible for such functions. Modern routers and switches, which typically run Linux operating systems, support TACACS+ protocol that enables system administrators to implement flexible rules for authentication and authorization. However, TACACS+ server implementation for Linux operating system, although neat, lacks a graphical user interface which makes daemon configuration a smooth and intuitive process. In the next few paragraphs, we will discuss how to configure the TACACS+ daemon on Linux operating system and demonstrate how to deploy a simple, yet intuitive, GUI used for the configuration of the TACACS+ instance.

    TACACS+, which stands for Terminal Access Controller Access-Control System Plus, is a protocol mainly designed by Cisco and standardized in RFC8907. The primary goal of the protocol is to handle authentication and authorization of commands executed on remote telecommunication hardware on a centralized server. TACACS+ is a great protocol and can be compared to RADIUS. Its key advantages are the following: it allows scrambling or obfuscating (although, not really encrypting in a cryptographic sense) the entire payload with help of MD5 hash function and a secret shared between telecommunication hardware and a central server, it supports TCP protocol for transport, and it provides the possibility of carrying out AAA functions in a flexible way. More details on the protocol can be found in the corresponding RFC.

  • Install Veritas Cluster server on CentOS 8 | RHEL 8 step by step - Unixcop

    This step-by-step guide intended to provide practical documentation for installing InfoScale Enterprise 7.4.1 in a non-production capacity. There is a innumerable of configurations for software products and the one used in this article is only meant to be used to demonstrate InfoScale’s . In this article we are about to learn how to Install Veritas Cluster server on CentOS 8 | RHEL 8 step by step.

    So The installation of InfoScale can_be performed using ISO installer, YUM, Response file, Kick start installer or from System management Satellite server.

    Also In our article, we are going to accomplish the installation using ISO installer.

  • Kubernetes: Install using MicroK8s on Ubuntu - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will show you how to install Kubernetes using MicroK8s on Ubuntu. MicroK8s makes it super easy to get going with Kubernetes. Additionally, MicroK8s is bundled with tools such as Prometheus. So you simply enable a feature if you need it.

  • How to install Anydesk on Ubuntu / Linux Mint - Unixcop

    AnyDesk is a closed source remote desktop application distributed by AnyDesk Software GmbH. The proprietary software program provides platform independent remote access to personal computers and other devices running the host application Due to this, the program often employed by internet scammers to take control of their victims computer over the internet. It offers remote control, file transfer, and VPN functionality.

    Also Anydesk has an attractive user-friendly interface and administrative tools through which you can easily manage the remote systems.

    WithAnyDesk, you can record everything you see on your computer as a video file so you can play back at any time.

    So In this guide, we will show you how to install AnyDesk on Ubuntu 20.04 and Linux Mint 20

    After that you can easily access your team member or friend’s system.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • #28 PrintScrn · This Week in GNOME

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from January 21 to January 28.

  • Implementing a MIME database in XXXX

    Recently, I have been working on implementing a parser for media types (commonly called MIME types) and a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice-versa. I thought this would be an interesting module to blog about, given that it’s only about 250 lines of code, does something useful and interesting, and demonstrates a few interesting xxxx concepts. The format for media types is more-or-less defined by RFC 2045, specifically section 5.1. The specification is not great. The grammar shown here is copied and pasted from parts of larger grammars in older RFCs, RFCs which are equally poorly defined. For example, the quoted-string nonterminal is never defined here, but instead comes from RFC 822, which defines it but also states that it can be “folded”, which technically makes the following a valid Media Type:

    text/plain;charset="hello
     world"
    
    Or so I would presume, but the qtext terminal “cannot include CR”, which is the mechanism by which folding is performed in the first place, and… bleh. Let’s just implement a “reasonable subset” of the spec instead and side-step the whole folding issue.1 This post will first cover parsing media types, then address our second goal: providing a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice versa.

  • gst-editing-services compiled in OE

    I discovered that 'gst-editing-services' is another dependency of Pitivi, added to these: https://bkhome.org/news/202201/more-dependencies-for-pitivi-video-editor.html There is no recipe in OE, so I attempted to compile it on the host system. Stuffed around for about 3 hours, unable to compile, ninja is doing something stupid.

  • More dependencies for Pitivi video editor

    This morning I posted about a complete recompile in OpenEmbedded, "revision 7": https://bkhome.org/news/202201/what-to-expect-in-the-next-release-of-easyos.html This included bumped gstreamer version, suitable to run Pitivi.

  • Wasmer 2.2 Bringing Its WebAssembly "Singlepass" Compiler To AArch64 - Phoronix

    Wasmer 2.2-rc1 is out today as the WebAssembly run-tme to "run any code on any client" with its broad platform coverage and allowing numerous programming languages from Rust to PHP to C# being able to be compiled into WebAssembly and then running on any OS or embedded into other languages for execution. Wasmer continues as one of the leading open-source WebAssembly runtimes with a diverse feature-set. Its project site at Wasmer.io talks up Wasmer for use from "supercharged blockchain infrastructure" to "portable ML/AI applications". Buzzwords aside, Wasmer has been a very interesting WebAssembly open-source project.

  • Alternatives to Visual Basic

    This is a list of free/libre open source software (FLOSS) alternatives to Visual Basic (part of Microsoft Visual Studio) computer programming platform. If your school is still teaching VB 6, or if you now use Ubuntu for programming classroom, we strongly suggest you to switch to either one of these alternatives. With these, one can create computer programs visually by drag and drop as well as coding just like what one can do with VB.

Graphics: DXVK-NVAPI, Wayland, Resizable BAR

  • DXVK-NVAPI 0.5.2 Released With Entry Points For NVIDIA PhysX - Phoronix

    DXVK-NVAPI as the open-source project implementing support for NVIDIA's NVAPI within the realm of DXVK is out with a new release, which is exciting for NVIDIA Linux gamers. DXVK-NVAPI is an important project for NVIDIA Linux gamers enjoying Valve's Steam Play (Proton) or outside of it as well if using DXVK otherwise. DXVK-NVAPI provides an NVAPI library implementation that can be used by the Windows games that make use of this NVIDIA API. DXVK-NVAPI is already used for Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS), NVAPI D3D11 extensions, and other features.

  • Wayland Testing New Protocol Extension To Handle Session Locking - Phoronix

    Wayland Protocols 1.25 was released today as the collection of testing and stable Wayland protocols. New to Wayland Protocols 1.25 is the session-lock-v1 protocol being experimental and responsible to handle session locking. The session-lock-v1 protocol is the main addition of Wayland Protocols 1.25 and allows for privileged Wayland clients to lock the session and display arbitrary graphics while in the locked mode. That authenticated client is responsible for handling user authentication and interfacing with the compositor for disabling the session lock when appropriate.

  • Intel Preparing Resizable BAR Support For Their Arc Graphics On Linux - Phoronix

    Ahead of the Intel Arc "Alchemist" graphics cards shipping this year, Intel's open-source developers have continued ironing out the Linux driver support. The most recent kernel patches are for getting their Resizable BAR "ReBAR" support in order. Sent out this week were a set of patches for small BAR recovery support for the Intel kernel graphics driver on Linux.

Kubernetes Leftovers

  • How to Tackle the Cloud Native Trends of 2022 | SUSE Communities

    At SUSE, we partner with several top-notch managed service providers to deliver the whole enterprise package — our open, interoperable offerings backed by their proven ops teams. We help MSPs more easily and securely deliver objectives despite the increasing complexity of the cloud and Kubernetes, while they help our enterprises get up and stay up, running faster, while cutting costs. We provide that much needed abstraction layer so they can focus on your enterprise modernizing securely.

  • Securing Kubernetes at the Infrastructure Level

    Infrastructure security is important to get right so that attacks can be prevented—or, in the case of a successful attack, damage can be minimized. It is especially important in a Kubernetes environment because, by default, a large number of Kubernetes configurations are not secure. Securing Kubernetes at the infrastructure level requires a combination of host hardening, cluster hardening and network security. [...] I have listed 10 best practices for securing Kubernetes at the infrastructure level. While this is certainly not an exhaustive list by any means, it should give you the foundation to make a good start. I recommend reading chapter two of Kubernetes security and observability: A holistic approach to securing containers and cloud-native applications, an O’Reilly book I co-authored, to learn about these best practices in further detail and to discover additional best practices for infrastructure security.

  • Should You Learn Kubernetes? – CloudSavvy IT

    Kubernetes has seen a surge of adoption over the past few years as companies have pivoted towards containers and cloud-native deployment methods. The platform’s become the leading orchestration solution for running containers in production. This means people who are skilled in using and managing Kubernetes clusters are now in-demand across the industry. In this article, we’ll look at whether you should learn Kubernetes based on your current role and future objectives. If you’re not being tasked with managing a cluster, the decision ultimately comes down to the skill set you want to acquire and the areas you might move into down the line.

  • Declarative vs Imperative Kubernetes Object Management – CloudSavvy IT

    Kubernetes is usually described as a declarative system. Most of the time you work with YAML that defines what the end state of the system should look like. Kubernetes supports imperative APIs too though, where you issue a command and get an immediate output. In this article, we’ll explore the differences between these two forms of object management. The chances are you’ve already used both even if you don’t recognize the terms.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Debian (graphicsmagick), Fedora (grafana), Mageia (aom and roundcubemail), openSUSE (log4j and qemu), Oracle (parfait:0.5), Red Hat (java-1.7.1-ibm and java-1.8.0-openjdk), Slackware (expat), SUSE (containerd, docker, log4j, and strongswan), and Ubuntu (cpio, shadow, and webkit2gtk).

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 202 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 202. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Don't fail if comparing a nonexistent file with a .pyc file (and add test).
      (Closes: #1004312)
    * Drop a reference in the manual page which claims the ability to compare
      non-existent files on the command-line. This has not been possible since
      version 32 which was released in September 2015. (Closes: #1004182)
    * Add experimental support for incremental output support with a timeout.
      Passing, for example, --timeout=60 will mean that diffoscope will not
      recurse into any sub-archives after 60 seconds total execution time has
      elapsed and mark the diff as being incomplete. (Note that this is not a
      fixed/strict timeout due to implementation issues.)
      (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#301)
    * Don't return with an exit code of 0 if we encounter device file such as
      /dev/stdin with human-readable metadata that matches literal, non-device,
      file contents. (Closes: #1004198)
    * Correct a "recompile" typo.
    
    [ Sergei Trofimovich ]
    * Fix/update whitespace for Black 21.12.

  • CISA Adds Eight Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog | CISA

    CISA has added eight new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence that threat actors are actively exploiting the vulnerabilities listed in the table below. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors of all types and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise.