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The pleasures of the Open Source development model

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OSS

The last days covered two news where some big companies cooperated with Open Source projects to improve their software. This is nothing special anymore in these days, but it is a pleasure every time when I see that the Open Source development model simply works.

One of the examples was the “Phonon/Solid Sprint” mentioned in Commit Digest Issue 55. The Phonon and Solid developers sat down together with several developers from Trolltech to improve the code and the APIs of both KDE projects. So for an entire week Trolltech invested quite a lot of man power into KDE 4. It is reported that they analyzed almost every line - try to imagine how much money this is worth!

Another example is Google.

Read More.

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today's howtos

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Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

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