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Distro Install Cold Turkey

Isn't it annoying how things in life pop up and get in the way of what you actually intended to do? With every new distro release I get this impulsive need to try it, to see if the grass really is greener on the other side. I need a week with 22 days and 48 hours a day just to catch up on all the work that I can't finish because I'm always tinkering and tweaking the installation and when I think I have it just right, I read something that sparks that little idea that puts on training shoes and runs a marathon of installs and ideas. I'm an install addict. Thats the bottom line. I need and I really do mean NEED to see what is in every distro listed on distrowatch. Is there an AA type meeting for such an addict? As I type this my laptop is thrashing the Kubuntu 7.04 CD and the PC in the corner whipping Fedora 6.0 off the shiny disk (yes, not that new but it's about the 5th installation of it on this PC). At least I worked out it would be wiser to create one partition for the OS and one for home... but that makes it even more easier to install yet another need to be tested distro. I just can't win. One of these days I'll actually finish all of the work I've started. Ho hum, suppose it's back to kdevelop and eclipse, deliver to the project timescales. Found a spoon sir. nice one centurion. I need install cold turkey.

And while I'm 'ere to register a complaint, how many more Middle Lane Muppets do we have to contend with in the morning? Grey hair old dears, hardly visible behind the steering wheel, plodding along at 60mph in the middle lane with empty lanes on BOTH sides. How many more times must I indicate that there are 3 lanes and not just the middle one by making the illegal undertaking move at the SPEED LIMIT. Even as I type this I can see them now. The state of british roads is becoming appalling, especially with these MLM's and MBN's (Mobile Bottle Necks - we're a truck tries to overtake another but takes 3 hours to do it thereby reducing 3 lanes of flowing traffic to 1 lane that soon gets filled with the MLM's now at 55mph in the outside lane!) Oh, and whilst we're (Sleepy on about cars, how many other people have a warranty the length of the new testament and worth as much as monopoly money? Steering a bit loose, into the garage, ball joints gone. Ball joints gone? This is a 2 year old car how could they POSSIBLY go? Dig out the warranty, call them up, fill in the paperwork, 2 days later get a call from NAC (the warranty people),

"It's wear and tear and not covered, you are only covered for immediate failure".

Immediate failure? That would be where I IGNORED the wobble and let the wheels drop off then? 2 years old and 30k miles. I have an 8 year old alfa 166 3.0 thats done 120k without a fault (an alfatastic miracle I know given the italian build quality, how can the italians ever build anything whilst spending all of their time flying about on mopeds, cigarette between the lips, looking cool and giving it the smooth 'ciao' to every passing female is beyond me). So the garage wanted 1500 pooonds to do the work that shouldn't need to be done on a practically new car!! Big bum fight with NAC ensued and ended with me losing and taking the car to the local garage where they stiffed me for 500 but threw in a change of brake discs and pads. I wonder if the NAC warranty was written by Microsoft? Well if I ever get caught short I know just what to use.

I had to dip into XP last week to "knock up" an application in C# to maintain some metadata. How many updates? How many validations? How many popups? After a year of linux (ok split hairs if you wish) I've had my eyes opened (even with the install fever). If I'm away from my perfectly tuned KDE for 2 mins I start to pine. It took me an age to get over the "oh, microsoft" feeling to actually get down to it and do some work with a sick feeling in my stomach. Yes I know I have monodevelop on the laptop but *ahem* it was in a sort of transient state after upgrading (cocking up) to 0.13 from the novell repo's and I was working within a timeframe. One thing I did like was the .NET 2005 ide and form designer. It had been a while since I was required to write any forms application but some of the features of the designer are well thought out and work very well. Pity it was running in XP. Yes, forms designer, I'm a lazy developer I know, but there's a distro coming soon that I need to install! The urge, the itch, burn the disk, no no no, work, work you need to work, but it might have...

This week it's back home in KDE, like a favourite pair of shoes where everything fits just right. Granted it's all Oracle SQLDeveloper and Eclipse work but it's in KDE and thats home.

Anyone else had a problem with Kubuntu feisty on a Dell? Weird, it won't shutdown properly. Justs sets the fans in super-turbo-loud mode and beeps a lot, like it's suffering the day after 15 pints of guinness and a drunken hot vindaloo. Either that or the neighbour has traded the car for a jumbo. I've converted 3 peeps in the office to Linux though (Kubuntu), I feel like a priest of free software, "demons begone! The power of Linux compels you! The Power of Linux compels you!".

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> demons begone! Welcome

> demons begone!

Welcome the daemons. Wink

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