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Amazon Linux 2022 Released

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  • AWS commits to update its own Linux every other year • The Register

    Amazon Web Services has announced that it will release an updated version of its own Linux every two years, starting with Amazon Linux 2022, which it is previewing now.

    The cloud colossus launched its first Linux distro in 2010, and seven … years … later … delivered a successor.

    In the name of speeding things up a bit, Jeff Bezos's computer rental service has promised a new release every other year, each of which will be supported for five years and receive quarterly tweaks.

    AL2022 uses the Fedora project as its upstream, but AWS may add or replace specific packages from other non-Fedora upstreams. The preview of AL2022 is based on Fedora34, while the full release will move up to Fedora 35 (which was released on 2 November).

    The SELinux security module is enabled and enforced by default in AL2022, but EC2 instances running the OS won't automatically implement patches or security updates. Users can instead choose to automate installation of packages, or patches, or both.

  • Announcing preview of Amazon Linux 2022

    Today, we are announcing the public preview of Amazon Linux 2022 (AL2022), Amazon's new general purpose Linux for AWS that is designed to provide a secure, stable, and high-performance execution environment to develop and run your cloud applications. Starting with AL2022, a new Amazon Linux major version will be available every two years and each version will be supported for five years. Customers will also be able to take advantage of quarterly updates via minor releases and use the latest software for their applications. Finally, AL2022 provides the ability to lock to a specific version of the Amazon Linux package repository giving customers control over how and when they absorb updates.

    Customers use a variety of Linux based distributions on AWS, including Amazon Linux 1 (AL1) and Amazon Linux 2 (AL2). These have become the preferred Linux choice for AWS customers because of no license costs, tight integration with AWS-specific tools and capabilities, immediate access to new AWS innovations, and a single-vendor support experience. AL2022 combines the benefits of our current Amazon Linux products with a predictable, two year release cycle, so customers can plan for operating system upgrades as part of their product lifecycles. The two year major release cycle provides customers the opportunity to keep their software current while the five year support commitment for each major release gives customers the stability they need to manage long project lifecycles.

  • Amazon Linux 2022 Released - Based On Fedora With Changes - Phoronix

    Amazon Web Services has made Amazon Linux 2022 now publicly available in preview form as the newest version of their Linux distribution.

    Amazon Linux / Amazon Linux 2 had been based on a combination of RHEL and Fedora packages while in today's Amazon Linux 2022 release they note it's explicitly based on Fedora. Besides apparently being more Fedora oriented now than RHEL, with Amazon Linux 2022 they are transitioning to a formal two year release cadence between their releases while having quarterly point releases.

    AWS intends to provide major Amazon Linux updates every two years while each major release will see five years of support and quarterly minor release updates.

A preview of Amazon's AL2022 distribution

TechRadar

  • AWS is making a major commitment to Linux | TechRadar

    Amazon’s cloud computing division, Amazon Web Services (AWS) has put out a preview of its custom Amazon Linux distro (AL2022), while committing to refreshing the distro every two years.

    Amazon Linux is popular with AWS users for its tight integration with AWS tools, and no license costs. The service also ensures that its new features work as advertised with the distro.

Amazon’s Own Linux Distribution is Now Completely...

  • Amazon’s Own Linux Distribution is Now Completely Based on Fedora

    In case you did not know already, Amazon has its own general purpose Linux distribution, unsurprisingly called Amazon Linux.

    It is intended to be used on AWS servers. When you are deploying a server, you have the choice to use Amazon Linux along with other popular choices of Ubuntu, Debian etc. Since it is from Amazon, there is no licensing fee and Amazon controls on repositories and packages. You can expect a tight integration with AWS tools and access to new AWS innovations with Amazon Linux.

    Amazon Linux 2022 (AL2022) in the next release in the line of Amazon Linux 1 and 2 and it will be released in 2022 (you can guess that from the version number).

SJVN late

  • AWS embraces Fedora Linux for its cloud-based Amazon Linux | ZDNet

    By and large, the public cloud runs on Linux. Most users, even Microsoft Azure customers, run Linux on the cloud.

    In the case of market giant Amazon Web Services (AWS), the cloud provider will let you run many Linux distros or their own homebrew Linux, Amazon Linux. Now, AWS has released an early version of its next distro, Amazon Linux 3, which is based on Red Hat's community Linux, Fedora.

Amazon Linux 3 To Be Based On Fedora Community Linux

  • Amazon Linux 3 To Be Based On Fedora Community Linux

    Amazon Web Services (AWS) released an early version of its upcoming distro, Amazon Linux 3, which is based on Red Hat’s Community Linux, Fedora.

    With Fedora as upstream, the new Amazon distro, AL2022 is extremely stable after extensive package stability tests and contains all available security updates. In addition, it is optimized for Amazon EC2 and integrates seamlessly with the latest AWS features and many AWS-specific tools.

    The brand new Amazon Linux also includes frequent and flexible quarterly updates, as each AL2022 update matches a specific version of the Amazon Linux package archive. Updates are only required if the user wants to make a move and not if a new version is released.

Authored by Bobby Borisov

  • Amazon Linux 2022 Was Recently Opened to Public Preview

    The cloud provider will let you run many Linux distributions or their own homebrew Linux, Amazon Linux 2022.

    Amazon Linux 2022 (AL2022) is an Amazon’s new general purpose Linux for AWS that is designed to provide a secure, stable, and high-performance execution environment to develop and run your cloud applications. The distro has had two major releases till now – the first (Amazon Linux) in 2010, and the second (Amazon Linux 2) in 2017.

    Amazon Linux is popular among AWS users for its tight integration with AWS tools, and no license costs. That combination is a clear pitch for the AWS users to also use the upcoming AL2022 if they want full AWS experience.

AWS Embraces Fedora Linux

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