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today's howtos

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HowTos
  1. How to play Fable Anniversary on Linux

    Fable Anniversary is a remaster for Fable: The Lost Chapters by Lion Head Studios and Microsoft Game Studios. The remake was released on Steam in 2014, and there is no plan for a Linux release. However, with a few tweaks, you can get the game working on Linux.

  2. How to install the Elementary OS desktop on Arch Linux

    Elementary OS is a great operating system with a beautiful desktop environment. Unfortunately, Elementary OS’s desktop is attached to Ubuntu. While Ubuntu is a decent operating system, it’s not as versatile as Arch Linux.

    If you love Arch Linux and want to use the Elementary OS desktop environment, you can. The Pantheon desktop is now in the official Arch Linux repos and can be installed. Here’s how to get it working on your system.

  3. Really lossy compression of JPEG

    Suppose you have a tool that archives images, or scientific data, and it has a test suite. It would be good to collect sample files for the test suite, but they are often so big one can't really bloat the repository with them.

    But does the test suite need everything that is in those files? Not necesarily. For example, if one's testing code that reads EXIF metadata, one doesn't care about what is in the image.

    That technique works extemely well. I can take GRIB files that are several megabytes in size, zero out their data payload, and get nice 1Kb samples for the test suite.

  4. LibreOffice Releases User Guides for Impress and Calc 7.2 - FOSS Force

    LibreOffice, the open source office productivity suite, announced on Tuesday the release of new user guides for two components of LibreOffice 7.2.

    Available now for free download are Impress Guide 7.2, for the suite’s slide presentation component (similar to PowerPoint), and Calc Guide 7.2, for LibreOffice’s spreadsheet component. A guide is already available for LibreOffice Writer 7.2, as well as a 7.2 Getting Started guide.

    These are remarkably complete guides, with the smallest (Impress) weighing in at 372 pages and the largest (Calc) containing 547 pages.

  5. Jolla/Sailfish OS: Developing our Developer Docs

    From a technical perspective Jolla has for a long time operated a three-pillar strategy; those pillars being Sailfish OS, Android App Support and our Developer Offering. If you watched Sami’s recent presentation at the ten year celebrations in Berlin, you’ll have seen the last of these highlighted as one of our unique assets: a “World-Class Developer Experience”.

  6. How to install Balena Etcher on Debian 11 Bullseye - Linux Shout

    Tutorial to install and run Balena Etcher on Debian 11 Bullseye Linux using command line terminal (repository) or portable AppImage.

    Etcher, an open-source tool to write ISO/Image files on a USB stick or SD card. It is available to run for all mainstream OS such as Linux, Windows, and macOS. Furthermore, in addition to the installer version, Windows also has a portable Etcher version that can be used without installation

    Using this program to write image files to removable media. It supports various image formats are * .iso , * .img , * .bin and also packed variants. The program also recognizes whether the image is bootable. Optionally, the successful write process can also be compared with the image file in order to identify damaged data carriers.

  7. The Calc Guide 7.2 is at the Station!

    This 548 pages guide is for beginner to advanced users of Calc, the spreadsheet component of LibreOffice. You may be new to spreadsheet software, or you may be familiar with another program, this book covers the main features of Calc. The new Calc guide has been updated from Calc Guide 7.1. It covers changes that are visible in the user interface, including the new Search Commands tool, the global toolbar lock, details of the properties dialog, improvements in the Status and Sidebar, new menu entries, standard filter dialog and new cross-shaped cursor.

    The book also introduced contents on user interface variants, AutoInput tool, the Find toolbar, the Paste Special dialog, the AutoFilter tool, template dialogs, QR code generation, multi-column feature for text boxes, updates on the Solver, Print, PDF and Certificate dialogs, as well as External data tool for HTML tables, updates on the Scriptforge library and the new built-in UNO object inspector.

  8. How and When to Update openSUSE Tumbleweed | Blathering – CubicleNate's Techpad

    I am often asked how often and when I update my openSUSE Tumbleweed machines. There are lots of opinions out there and many of them might be more right than my own, but my method has been reliable for my uses for about four years and counting. I run openSUSE Tumbleweed and openSUSE Leap on various machines using multiple architectures and I am quite confident that my methods are sound. Ultimately, the frequency you update has to work with you, your use cases and your network limitations. It should also be noted, when doing an “update” in Tumbleweed, it is a full on Distribution Upgrade, not just the updating of packages as you would perform on an openSUSE Leap machine. I am using “Update” in the most general term possible. I had must consternation over this title, as a consequence of knowing the difference between update and distribution-upgrade.

    It is generally considered best to keep your system as up to date as possible, at all times to prevent nefarious actors from gaining access to your system and your data. I also realize that this is not always practical and as such have been noodling around what kind of frequency once should do their updates. This is a question I receive rather frequently and decided that I am going to blather a bit about how and when to update while including some of the difficulties I have experienced over the year.

  9. Using SlickStack to Install WordPress Automatically on Ubuntu 20.04 - ByteXD

    SlickStack is essentially a collection of scripts for quickly and easily installing WordPress, with Nginx1 as a web server, on Ubuntu LTS.

    It aims at making it easier for users to deploy lightweight, fast and secure WordPress websites, and guides users and helps them secure their server during the installation process.

    This is especially useful for new users who just need to painlessly setup a fast and secure WordPress website on a cheap Ubuntu server, which can be cheaper and faster than paying for shared hosting. These servers usually cost $5-$10.

    The philosophy of SlickStack can be found towards the end of their main page at slickstack.io. That, along with the fact that the developer is very experienced in web hosting and passionate about the project, are the factors that I think make SlickStack worth considering for your projects.

    The developer is very helpful and frequently asks for feedback regarding the direction of SlickStack, so they can improve. This is very important, because if you adopt a software for your long term project, you want to know that software will stay up-to-date, will get new features, and will patch any potential vulnerabilities.

    In this article we’ll go over how to use SlickStack to install WordPress on a server running Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as give you a basic overview of some of its options. We won’t be able to cover all of its options, however, so be sure to check their Github and slickstack.io for more in-depth info.

More in Tux Machines

Okular PDF digital signature improvements coming "soon" thanks to NLnet

Starting on January I will be working on a project named "Improve Okular digital signature support" that has received a grant from the NLnet foundation as part of the NGI Assure fund. This will allow me to work part time on Okular (in case it's not clear I work on Okular on a "when I have time-hobby" basis right now), the planned improvements are: 1. Support for signing unsigned signatures. I know it sounds confusing, think about it like something like the old "sign here" boxes on printed paper forms. Read more

FPGA SoC modules gain networking carrier and new PolarFire SoC model

Enclustra’s “Mercury+ PE3” carrier for its FPGA/SoC Mercury/Mercury+ modules can act as an SBC or plug into a PC via PCIe x8. It offers QSFP+, 4x SFP+, FireFly, and 2x GbE. We also examine a new “Mercury+ MP1” module based on the RISC-V based PolarFire SoC. In May, Switzerland based Enclustra announced a Mercury+ ST1 baseboard for its FPGA/SoC powered Mercury and Mercury+ compute modules. These include a Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC based Mercury+ XU6 module that was announced at the same time. Now the company has unveiled a more feature-rich Mercury+ PE3 board for the Mercury/Mercury+ product line. Farther below, we report on a similarly “in development” Mercury+ MP1 module based on Microchip’s based PolarFire SoC, which includes RISC-V based CPU cores and Microchip’s PolarFire FPGA. Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • IBM applauds Knative’s application to join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Today, Knative applied to become an incubating project at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Today’s news is a major step in the right direction for the future of Knative. Knative adds the necessary components that enable Kubernetes users to more quickly deploy and manage their workloads on Kubernetes — but without the need to become Kubernetes experts. Additionally, Knative adds “serverless” runtime semantics, allowing users to reap the benefit of features such as quick load-based scaling and scaling to zero when idle.

  • 3 ways to optimize Ansible Automation Platform for scale and performance | Enable Sysadmin

    Try these settings to optimize performance with Ansible Automation Platform on a massive scale.

  • Introduction to Ansible prompts and runtime variables

    This tutorial is part of a series we dedicated to Ansible. Previously we talked about the Ansible basics, then we focused on some Ansible modules we can use to perform some very common administration tasks, and we also talked about Ansible loops. In this article, instead, we learn how to create interactive prompts we can use to ask for user input and how to pass variables at runtime.

  • MIXAL on Fedora | Adam Young’s Web Log

    The examples in The Art of Computer Programming (TAOCP) are in the MIXAL programming language. In order to see these examples run, I want to install the tools on my Fedora box. They are packaged as RPMS, so this is trivial. Here are the steps to run and debug a sample program in MIXAL.

  • Fedora Contributor Annual Survey Data Set Available – Fedora Community Blog

    Over the summer of 2021, the Fedora Council held the first annual Contributor Survey. The survey received 800 complete responses, which exceeded the goal of 500. We have processed the data, which are available for download. Coordination of the survey was a wonderful community effort. Fedora Council member Aleksandra Fedorova proposed and led the survey effort with support from Marie Nordin (FCAIC). Many teams across the Fedora Project contributed, including: the Mindshare Committee, the Outreach Revamp Team, the Design Team, the Websites & Apps Team, and the Community Platform Engineering Team. Aleksandra and Marie presented a session at Nest with Fedora which goes further into the process and outcomes. Over the last couple months, the work of cleaning up the dataset has been underway. This has been a slow process as there are just a couple of people working on that regularly. An example of “cleaning” would be folks who chose “Other”, filled in “idk”, when the option “I don’t know” existed. Those answers need to be integrated in order to have a more accurate dataset. We removed fill-in answers due to the fact that some people identified themselves, intentionally or not. As we process the data, we are noting feedback to improve the survey for 2022.

WordPress 5.9 Beta 1

WordPress 5.9 Beta 1 is now available for testing! This version of the WordPress software is under development. You don’t want to run this version on a production site. Instead, it is recommended that you run this on a test site. This will allow you to test out the new version. Read more Also: People of WordPress: Devin Maeztri