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Free, Open, Eating Its Young

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OSS

The FOSS (Free/Open Source Software) world is cram-full of interesting, smart, fun people. It's also full of trolls, jerks, and abusive wastes of time, and very confused when it comes to civility. A lot of FOSSers fall into the Five Geek Social Fallacies trap, especially the first two:

Geek Social Fallacy #1: Ostracizers Are Evil

"GSF1 prevents its carrier from participating in -- or tolerating -- the exclusion of anyone from anything, be it a party, a comic book store, or a web forum, and no matter how obnoxious, offensive, or aromatic the prospective excludee may be. As a result, nearly every geek social group of significant size has at least one member that 80% of the members hate, and the remaining 20% merely tolerate."

Geek Social Fallacy #2: Friends Accept Me As I Am

Full Story.

Good article

It's appalling to see how women sometimes get treated in IT, esp. greeted with prejudice. Writers such as Carla, PJ and also yourself help change perception, kill the stereotypes and hopefully end comment abuse. It's a good thing you don't allow anonymous comments.

re: Good article

I haven't experienced too many "bad behaviors" other than the usual sexual harassment in real life. On the internet I've rarely been treated badly. I think it all depends on your attitude and how you talk to folks more than what sex you are.

Yeah, I disabled anonymous comments due to the spammers tho. Now they are signing up and posting it. You just about can't beat spammer. However there are groups that are trying. But that's another story.

As for the real life sexual harassment... I miss those days! Laughing j/k

You're using Drual, which is

You're using Drual, which is popular. People have signup/posting scripts for it and they work on a series of sites to make spamming more effective. It's the cost of using popular software, which sometimes needs to be put to rest as a result (too much 'maintenance').

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