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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Using AWK with CSV Files

    Unfortunately, things get more complex from there.

    CSV files can contain commas, line-breaks, and delimited quotes within the quoted values, which is great for storing data in a CSV file, but is something that AWK is just not well suited to handle: [...]

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: nanotime 0.3.4 on CRAN: Maintenance Update

    Another (minor) nanotime release, now at version 0.3.4, arrived at CRAN overnight. It exports some nanoperiod functionality via a C++ header, and Leonardo and I will use this in an upcoming package that we hope to talk about a little more in a few days. It also adds a few as.character.*() methods that had not been included before.

    nanotime relies on the RcppCCTZ package for (efficient) high(er) resolution time parsing and formatting up to nanosecond resolution, and the bit64 package for the actual integer64 arithmetic. Initially implemented using the S3 system, it has benefitted greatly from a rigorous refactoring by Leonardo who not only rejigged nanotime internals in S4 but also added new S4 types for periods, intervals and durations.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.10.7.3.0 on CRAN: Bugfix, New Features

    Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 928 other packages on CRAN.

    I somehow missed to blog and tweet about the recent release based on the Armadillo 10.7.3 upstream release. Conrad is in “long-term support mode”, and 10.7.* is meant to provide fixes and stability relative to the most recent release which we did on September 30. We did actually find a regression when checking reverse-dependencies requiring an upstream move to 10.7.3. At the same time, we folded pull request #352 in. It addresses an old bug of ours where Armadillo fields types were not converted correctly in all dimensions.

  • PHP Established New Non-Commercial Organization PHP Foundation

    The reasons behind the establishment of the PHP Foundation is that one of the key contributors, Nikita Popov, has decided to switch his focus away from PHP to LLVM.

    You might think that large open source projects are well-funded, but this is not true. In fact many of them rely on a small group of maintainers, as is exactly the case with PHP.

    Despite being used by 78% of the web, PHP only has a few full-time contributors.

    Nikita Popov, a well-known long-time PHP ecosystem contributor, is the author of generators, variadic functions and argument unpacking, engine exceptions, uniform variable syntax, and many other PHP contributions. He is also known for PHP Parser which laid the groundwork for many other tools.

    Popov started working on PHP in 2011 and worked on PHP at JetBrains with the PhpStorm team, making significant contributions to three major releases there – PHP 7.4, PHP 8.0, and PHP 8.1.

More in Tux Machines

Okular PDF digital signature improvements coming "soon" thanks to NLnet

Starting on January I will be working on a project named "Improve Okular digital signature support" that has received a grant from the NLnet foundation as part of the NGI Assure fund. This will allow me to work part time on Okular (in case it's not clear I work on Okular on a "when I have time-hobby" basis right now), the planned improvements are: 1. Support for signing unsigned signatures. I know it sounds confusing, think about it like something like the old "sign here" boxes on printed paper forms. Read more

FPGA SoC modules gain networking carrier and new PolarFire SoC model

Enclustra’s “Mercury+ PE3” carrier for its FPGA/SoC Mercury/Mercury+ modules can act as an SBC or plug into a PC via PCIe x8. It offers QSFP+, 4x SFP+, FireFly, and 2x GbE. We also examine a new “Mercury+ MP1” module based on the RISC-V based PolarFire SoC. In May, Switzerland based Enclustra announced a Mercury+ ST1 baseboard for its FPGA/SoC powered Mercury and Mercury+ compute modules. These include a Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC based Mercury+ XU6 module that was announced at the same time. Now the company has unveiled a more feature-rich Mercury+ PE3 board for the Mercury/Mercury+ product line. Farther below, we report on a similarly “in development” Mercury+ MP1 module based on Microchip’s based PolarFire SoC, which includes RISC-V based CPU cores and Microchip’s PolarFire FPGA. Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • IBM applauds Knative’s application to join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Today, Knative applied to become an incubating project at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Today’s news is a major step in the right direction for the future of Knative. Knative adds the necessary components that enable Kubernetes users to more quickly deploy and manage their workloads on Kubernetes — but without the need to become Kubernetes experts. Additionally, Knative adds “serverless” runtime semantics, allowing users to reap the benefit of features such as quick load-based scaling and scaling to zero when idle.

  • 3 ways to optimize Ansible Automation Platform for scale and performance | Enable Sysadmin

    Try these settings to optimize performance with Ansible Automation Platform on a massive scale.

  • Introduction to Ansible prompts and runtime variables

    This tutorial is part of a series we dedicated to Ansible. Previously we talked about the Ansible basics, then we focused on some Ansible modules we can use to perform some very common administration tasks, and we also talked about Ansible loops. In this article, instead, we learn how to create interactive prompts we can use to ask for user input and how to pass variables at runtime.

  • MIXAL on Fedora | Adam Young’s Web Log

    The examples in The Art of Computer Programming (TAOCP) are in the MIXAL programming language. In order to see these examples run, I want to install the tools on my Fedora box. They are packaged as RPMS, so this is trivial. Here are the steps to run and debug a sample program in MIXAL.

  • Fedora Contributor Annual Survey Data Set Available – Fedora Community Blog

    Over the summer of 2021, the Fedora Council held the first annual Contributor Survey. The survey received 800 complete responses, which exceeded the goal of 500. We have processed the data, which are available for download. Coordination of the survey was a wonderful community effort. Fedora Council member Aleksandra Fedorova proposed and led the survey effort with support from Marie Nordin (FCAIC). Many teams across the Fedora Project contributed, including: the Mindshare Committee, the Outreach Revamp Team, the Design Team, the Websites & Apps Team, and the Community Platform Engineering Team. Aleksandra and Marie presented a session at Nest with Fedora which goes further into the process and outcomes. Over the last couple months, the work of cleaning up the dataset has been underway. This has been a slow process as there are just a couple of people working on that regularly. An example of “cleaning” would be folks who chose “Other”, filled in “idk”, when the option “I don’t know” existed. Those answers need to be integrated in order to have a more accurate dataset. We removed fill-in answers due to the fact that some people identified themselves, intentionally or not. As we process the data, we are noting feedback to improve the survey for 2022.

WordPress 5.9 Beta 1

WordPress 5.9 Beta 1 is now available for testing! This version of the WordPress software is under development. You don’t want to run this version on a production site. Instead, it is recommended that you run this on a test site. This will allow you to test out the new version. Read more Also: People of WordPress: Devin Maeztri