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Open Hardware/Modding: Arduino UNO, ESP32, Raspberry Pi, RISC-V

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  • Arduino UNO Mini Limited Edition launched to celebrate 10 million Arduino UNO milestone - CNX Software

    Ten million Arduino UNO boards have been shipped since its launch in 2010, and the Arduino team has designed the Arduino UNO Mini Limited Edition to celebrate the impressive milestone.

    The Arduino UNO Mini has basically all the same features as the original Arduino UNO but uses a quarter of the area, and features a USB Type-C port for programming the board with the Arduino IDE.

  • 3D printer controller combines ESP32-S3 & Microchip SAME51 microcontrollers (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Here’s another ESP32 3D printer controller board with the Phi MainBoard 5LC powered by both an ESP32-S3-WROOM module and a Microchip SAME51 Cortex-M4F microcontroller, and providing Ethernet and WiFi connectivity.

    Designed by Likha Labs from the Philippines, Phi MainBoard 5LC is pre-loaded with RepRapFirmware firmware running the Duet Web Control interface that allows users to upload G-code files, configure settings, start jobs, control the device, and monitor prints. Besides 3D printers, the developers explain the board can also be used to drive other digital-fabrication equipment, such as CNC machines.

  • Seaberry Mini-ITX carrier board for Raspberry Pi CM4 exposes 11 PCIe slots and sockets

    The Raspberry Pi CM4 may only have a one PCIe x1 Gen 2 interface, but this has not stopped ALFTEL from designing Seaberry, a mini-ITX carrier board for the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 with eleven slots and sockets making use of the single 5 Gbps PCIe Gen 2 interface.

    The board also offers two SATA ports, one Gigabit Ethernet port, one RJ45 console port, two HDMI ports, a micro SD card slot, two USB 2.0 ports, as well as the usual 40-pin GPIO expansion header, besides the PCIe x16 slot, a PCIe x1 side slot, and M.2 and mPCIe sockets.

  • Codasip Adopts Imperas for RISC-V Processor Verification

    Imperas Software Ltd., the leader in verification solutions for RISC-V, and Codasip, the leader in customizable RISC-V processor IP, today announced that Codasip has adopted Imperas reference designs and the Imperas DV solution for Codasip IP. Codasip has invested heavily into processor verification to deliver the industry’s highest quality RISC-V processors.

    Codasip has included Imperas golden reference models in its DV testbenches to ensure an efficient verification flow that accommodates a wide range of flexible features and options while scaling across the entire roadmap of future cores to enable rigorous confirmation of functional quality.

More in Tux Machines

Okular PDF digital signature improvements coming "soon" thanks to NLnet

Starting on January I will be working on a project named "Improve Okular digital signature support" that has received a grant from the NLnet foundation as part of the NGI Assure fund. This will allow me to work part time on Okular (in case it's not clear I work on Okular on a "when I have time-hobby" basis right now), the planned improvements are: 1. Support for signing unsigned signatures. I know it sounds confusing, think about it like something like the old "sign here" boxes on printed paper forms. Read more

FPGA SoC modules gain networking carrier and new PolarFire SoC model

Enclustra’s “Mercury+ PE3” carrier for its FPGA/SoC Mercury/Mercury+ modules can act as an SBC or plug into a PC via PCIe x8. It offers QSFP+, 4x SFP+, FireFly, and 2x GbE. We also examine a new “Mercury+ MP1” module based on the RISC-V based PolarFire SoC. In May, Switzerland based Enclustra announced a Mercury+ ST1 baseboard for its FPGA/SoC powered Mercury and Mercury+ compute modules. These include a Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC based Mercury+ XU6 module that was announced at the same time. Now the company has unveiled a more feature-rich Mercury+ PE3 board for the Mercury/Mercury+ product line. Farther below, we report on a similarly “in development” Mercury+ MP1 module based on Microchip’s based PolarFire SoC, which includes RISC-V based CPU cores and Microchip’s PolarFire FPGA. Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • IBM applauds Knative’s application to join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Today, Knative applied to become an incubating project at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Today’s news is a major step in the right direction for the future of Knative. Knative adds the necessary components that enable Kubernetes users to more quickly deploy and manage their workloads on Kubernetes — but without the need to become Kubernetes experts. Additionally, Knative adds “serverless” runtime semantics, allowing users to reap the benefit of features such as quick load-based scaling and scaling to zero when idle.

  • 3 ways to optimize Ansible Automation Platform for scale and performance | Enable Sysadmin

    Try these settings to optimize performance with Ansible Automation Platform on a massive scale.

  • Introduction to Ansible prompts and runtime variables

    This tutorial is part of a series we dedicated to Ansible. Previously we talked about the Ansible basics, then we focused on some Ansible modules we can use to perform some very common administration tasks, and we also talked about Ansible loops. In this article, instead, we learn how to create interactive prompts we can use to ask for user input and how to pass variables at runtime.

  • MIXAL on Fedora | Adam Young’s Web Log

    The examples in The Art of Computer Programming (TAOCP) are in the MIXAL programming language. In order to see these examples run, I want to install the tools on my Fedora box. They are packaged as RPMS, so this is trivial. Here are the steps to run and debug a sample program in MIXAL.

  • Fedora Contributor Annual Survey Data Set Available – Fedora Community Blog

    Over the summer of 2021, the Fedora Council held the first annual Contributor Survey. The survey received 800 complete responses, which exceeded the goal of 500. We have processed the data, which are available for download. Coordination of the survey was a wonderful community effort. Fedora Council member Aleksandra Fedorova proposed and led the survey effort with support from Marie Nordin (FCAIC). Many teams across the Fedora Project contributed, including: the Mindshare Committee, the Outreach Revamp Team, the Design Team, the Websites & Apps Team, and the Community Platform Engineering Team. Aleksandra and Marie presented a session at Nest with Fedora which goes further into the process and outcomes. Over the last couple months, the work of cleaning up the dataset has been underway. This has been a slow process as there are just a couple of people working on that regularly. An example of “cleaning” would be folks who chose “Other”, filled in “idk”, when the option “I don’t know” existed. Those answers need to be integrated in order to have a more accurate dataset. We removed fill-in answers due to the fact that some people identified themselves, intentionally or not. As we process the data, we are noting feedback to improve the survey for 2022.

WordPress 5.9 Beta 1

WordPress 5.9 Beta 1 is now available for testing! This version of the WordPress software is under development. You don’t want to run this version on a production site. Instead, it is recommended that you run this on a test site. This will allow you to test out the new version. Read more Also: People of WordPress: Devin Maeztri