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Proprietary Software Leftovers

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Software
  • AuriStor breathes life into Andrew File System – Blocks and Files [Ed: Financial ripoff; AuriStorFS is also limited to an operating system with NSA back doors so it's money down the sewer.]

    Andrew File System developer AuriStor updated attendees at an IT Press Tour briefing about its work on the file system with an HPC and large enterprise customer base dating back 16 or more years.

    AuriStorFS (a modern, licensed version of AFS) is a networked file system providing local access to files in a global namespace that has claimed higher performance, security and data integrity than public cloud-based file-sharing offerings such as Nasuni and Panzura.

    AuriStor is a small and distributed organisation dedicated to expanding the popularity and cross-platform use of AuriStorFS.

  • India says not to preorder Starlink until it obtains a license

    “Public is advised not to subscribe to Starlink services being advertised,” a tweet from India’s Department of Telecommunications (DoT) reads. The DoT also says it asked Starlink to refrain from “booking / rendering the satellite internet services in India.” In other words, Starlink will have to put preorders on hold until it can get approval from the Indian government.

  • India tells public to shun Musk-backed Starlink until it gets licence

    A government statement issued late on Friday said Starlink had been told to comply with regulations and refrain from "booking/rendering the satellite internet services in India with immediate effect".

  • GitHub is back online after a two-hour outage

    Microsoft-owned GitHub experienced a more than two-hour long outage today, affecting thousands or potentially millions of developers that rely on its many services. GitHub started experiencing issues at around 3:45PM ET, with Git operations, API requests, GitHub actions, packages, pages, and pull requests all affected.

  • Insurers run from ransomware cover as losses mount

    Faced with increased demand, major European and U.S. insurers and syndicates operating in the Lloyd's of London market have been able to charge higher premium rates to cover ransoms, the repair of hacked networks, business interruption losses and even PR fees to mend reputational damage.

    But the increase in ransomware attacks and the growing sophistication of attackers have made insurers wary. Insurers say some attackers may even check whether potential victims have policies that would make them more likely to pay out.

  • Apple Grants Repair Indulgence for iPhones

    Save your huzzahs and whatever you do, do not pop the champagne. Apple did not just ‘cave’ to the right to repair movement, and the fight for an actual, legal right to repair is more important now than ever.

    The occasion for this reminder is, of course, the little-‘m’ momentous announcement by Apple this morning that it would make “Apple parts, tools, and manuals” available to “individual consumers” for self repair — starting with the iPhone 12 and iPhone 13.”

  • Montana high school hit by ransomware

    From their listing, Avos Locker is clearly aware that this is a tiny school district with only a few hundred students and less than two dozen teachers. And yet they are trying to ransom them. Avos writes: “If they refuse to negotiate, we will leak all the data we’ve got.”

  • Apple alerts journalists, activists about state-sponsored [cracking] attempts after NSO Group suit

    On the same day Apple announced a lawsuit against Israeli spyware vendor NSO Group for developing [cracking] tools to help breach iOS technology, the company was notifying potential targets of those exploits.

    El Faro, a news organization in San Salvador, El Salvador, reported late Tuesday that 12 of its staff members received notices from the company, which warned that that “Apple believes you are being targeted by state-sponsored attackers who are trying to remotely compromise the iPhone associated with your Apple ID.” The company also sent notices to four others in San Salvador who are “leaders of Civil Society organizations and opposition political parties,” the news organization reported.

  • Run a website off a Google Sheets Database, with Hugo

    Here’s how I built a website, Profilerpedia, using a Google Sheet as the backing database.

    Profilerpedia aims to map the profiling ecosystem and connect software with profilers and profilers with great analysis UIs, so we can make code faster and more efficient. More on Profilerpedia in the announcement post.

    It’s interesting to explain the architecture, because it challenges some engineering dogmas, like “a spreadsheet isn’t a good database”. I think running your site from a spreadsheet is a very reasonable pattern for many sites.

    The resulting architecture is my third or fourth attempt at this; I learned a lot along the way, I’m pretty happy with the result, and I want to share what I learned.

  • Boeing Missteps on 737 MAX Went Beyond Deadly Crashes That Killed 346, new Book Reveals

    When the first Boeing 737 MAX plane came off the production line in December 2015, it was the beginning of a highly anticipated new line of aircraft for the storied company. It incorporated the latest technology and was billed by Boeing as "deliver[ing] the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market." Tragically, that promise came to a glaring halt with two back-to-back disasters in which flight control software known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) incorrectly gauged the aircrafts' angles of ascent and prevented the pilots from manually overriding it. In total, 346 people on board Lion Air flight 610 on October 28, 2018 and Ethiopian Air flight 302 on March 10, 2019 were killed after only about 13 minutes and 6 minutes in the air, respectively.

More in Tux Machines

Fedora Magazine: Five common mistakes when using automation

As automation expands to cover more aspects of IT, more administrators are learning automation skills and applying them to ease their workload. Automation can ease the burden of repetitive tasks and add a level of conformity to infrastructure. But when IT workers deploy automation, there are common mistakes that can wreak havoc on infrastructures large and small. Five common mistakes are typically seen in automation deployments. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Reproducible Builds: Supporter spotlight: Jan Nieuwenhuizen on Bootstrappable Builds, GNU Mes and GNU Guix

    The Reproducible Builds project relies on several projects, supporters and sponsors for financial support, but they are also valued as ambassadors who spread the word about our project and the work that we do. This is the fourth instalment in a series featuring the projects, companies and individuals who support the Reproducible Builds project. We started this series by featuring the Civil Infrastructure Platform project and followed this up with a post about the Ford Foundation as well as a recent ones about ARDC and the Google Open Source Security Team (GOSST). Today, however, we will be talking with Jan Nieuwenhuizen about Bootstrappable Builds, GNU Mes and GNU Guix.

  • CISA Issues Emergency Directive and Releases Advisory Related to VMware Vulnerabilities [Ed: Proprietary software is a threat to national security]

    CISA has issued Emergency Directive (ED) 22-03 and released a Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA) in response to active and expected exploitation of multiple vulnerabilities in the following VMware products: VMware Workspace ONE Access (Access), VMware Identity Manager (vIDM), VMware vRealize Automation (vRA), VMware Cloud Foundation, vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager.

  • Software Supply Chain: A Risky Time for Dependencies [Ed: This is a proprietary software problem too and it's not a new problem; the FUD patterns are newer and driven by special interests]

    The software supply chain is a critical element in the lifecycle of applications and websites. The interdependencies and components common in modern software development can increase the attack surface and sometimes allow hackers to bypass robust security layers you’ve added to your infrastructure.

Shows and Videos: FLOSS Weekly, Linux Out Loud, Bringing Windows Best Feature To Linux, and More

  • FLOSS Weekly 681: Yes, UCAN - James Walker, Fission.codes and UCAN

    User Controlled Authorization Networks (UCANs) are just one of the many new and useful approaches to decentralization that James Walker, of fission.codes, shares with Doc Searls and Dan Lynch. If you want a detailed dose of pure optimism about Web3 working for you and me, this is the episode for you on FLOSS Weekly.

  • 14: Back Stage Pass - Linux Out Loud - TuxDigital

    This week, Linux Out Loud chats about what it is like for us to be content creators on the Tux Digital Network. Welcome to episode 14 of Linux Out Loud. We fired up our mics, connected those headphones as we searched the community for themes to expound upon. We kept the banter friendly, the conversation somewhat on topic, and had fun doing it.

  • Bringing Windows Best Feature To Linux!! - Invidious

    Have you ever felt like Linux was just missing something but not sure what it was missing, well maybe it was missing a really annoying watermark telling you to activate your system everytime you use it.

  • Why Use The Terminal Instead of GUI Apps? - Invidious

    New Linux users often are confused with why more intermediate-to-advanced users gravitate to the terminal rather than just using GUI apps for the same task. There are reasons why newer users hate the terminal and longtime Linux users love the terminal.

  • Linux in the Ham Shack/LHS Episode #467: The Weekender XCI

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our departure into the world of hedonism, random topic excursions, whimsy and (hopefully) knowledge. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

Android Leftovers