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toiday's leftovers

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  • Linux Weekly Roundup #158

    Welcome to this week's Linux Roundup. It was a full week of Linux releases with Endless OS 4.0.0 and Deepin 20.3.

    We hope that you had a good week and may the be a great one ahead!

  • Putting the Open back into Open Source

    Agility has never been more important than it is in today’s disrupted digital world. Leaders in every industry are trying to find a balance between the stability that allows them to plan for the future, while creating highly agile organisations that can quickly respond to new challenges and opportunities.

    This agility only comes from the ability to innovate at speed, which is why open source communities are as vital as ever. According to SUSE’s recently commissioned Insight Avenue report, Why Today’s IT Leaders are Choosing Open, 84% now see open source as a way to cost-effectively drive this innovation.

  • How To Install Snap on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Snap on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Snap also known as Snappy is an alternative package management tool and program package format developed by Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux. All the snaps are usually stored in a central repository called Snap Store from where snaps can be downloaded and installed using the snap command. Snaps work across a range of Linux distributions, which makes them a distro-agnostic upstream software deployment solution.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Snap Package Manager on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • The European Commission To Force Apple To Allow App Sideloading (NASDAQ:AAPL) | Seeking Alpha [Ed: It is NOT called SIDELOADING… it’s called INSTALLING!]

    Investors are ignoring significant regulatory developments for Apple while distracted by Apple Car speculation.

  • Unboxing Busybox: Claroty and JFrog uncovers 14 vulnerabilities

    Embedded devices with limited memory and storage resources are likely to leverage a tool such as BusyBox, which is marketed as the Swiss Army Knife of embedded Linux. BusyBox is a software suite of Unix utilities, known as applets, that are packaged as a single executable file.

    Within BusyBox you can find a full-fledged shell, a DHCP client/server, and small utilities such as cp, ls, grep, and others. You’re also likely to find many OT and IoT devices running BusyBox, including popular programmable logic controllers (PLCs), human-machine interfaces (HMIs), and remote terminal units (RTUs)—many of which now run on Linux.

    As part of our commitment to improving open-source software security, Claroty’s Team82 and JFrog collaborated on a vulnerability research project examining BusyBox. Using static and dynamic techniques, Claroty’s Team82 and JFrog discovered 14 vulnerabilities affecting the latest version of BusyBox.

    In most cases, the expected impact of these issues is denial of service (DoS). However, in rarer cases, these issues can also lead to information leaks and possibly remote code execution.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 140: Multiplication Tables
  • Leaky Rakudo

    Yesterday the discord-bridge-bot refused to perform its 2nd job: EVAL All The Things! The EVALing is done via shell-out and requires a fair bit of RAM (Rakudo is equally slim then Santa). After about 3 weeks the fairly simple bot had grown from about halve a GB to one and a halve – while mostly waiting for the intertubes to deliver small pieces of text. I complained on IRC and was advised to take heap snapshots. Since I didn’t know how to make heaps of snapshots, I had to take timo’s directions towards use Telemetry. As snap(:heap) wasn’t willing to surrender the filename of the snapshot (I want to compress the file, it is going to get big over time) I had a look at the source. I also requested a change to Rakudo so I don’t have to hunt down the filename, which was fulfilled by lizmat 22 minutes later. Since you may not have a very recent Rakudo, the following snipped might be useful.

  • Nemiver debugger now in devx SFS

    Mike (mikewalsh) responded with a great link that lists lots of Linux debugger/trace tools. The EasyOS devx SFS already has the 'gdb' CLI utility, and I saw on that link, there are 'ddd' and 'nemiver' GUI frontends for gdb.
    I went for nemiver and compiled it. The project seems to be almost dead, but then, if it works, perhaps no need for more commits to the git repository. I chose version 0.8.2, not the latest, but it suited me to stay with a gtk+2 based app rather than gtk+3.
    Two dependencies, 'gtkmm' and 'libgtop', are compiled in OpenEmbedded. I compiled 'libgtksourceviewmm' and 'nemiver' in a running EasyOS and made them into PETs.

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