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today's leftovers

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  • How Ubuntu Boosts Developer Desktop Productivity | Ubuntu

    Seventeen years after its first release, Ubuntu is firmly established as the Linux developer desktop of choice around the world. From education through to enterprise, Ubuntu delivers the tools developers need to succeed across their careers. In this blog, we will cover the main aspects that contribute to this success.

    [...]

    Developers start their careers with Ubuntu, and 69% of student developers reported that they prefer Ubuntu as an OS. It’s not surprising. With Ubuntu, they gain access to the best of open source, including AI/ML frameworks, such as Pytorch and TensorFlow, ROS for robotics and LXD and multipass for virtualisation. Open source technology is now a critical part of any enterprise, and familiarity with open source is a key consideration in hiring.

    As a result, getting new developers onboarded and productive quickly is easier with Ubuntu. It’s a system they’re familiar with. It’s flexible and customisable. And, as an operating system, it spans both the workstation and the cloud, providing a consistent development experience across your technology stack.

  • Our 12 favorite Arduino UNO projects | Arduino Blog

    The UNO wasn’t Arduino’s first board, and it won’t be its last. There have been many varieties of microcontroller and maker boards before and after the UNO, but none have been as iconic. As we cross the epic milestone of 10 million UNOs sold and the launch of the UNO Mini Limited Edition, we decided it was time to take a look back at some of our favorite UNO projects from the last 10 years.

    And we want to hear about yours, too. Join us over on social media to share your favorite UNO projects, whether you built them yourself or marveled at someone else’s electronic creation.

  • Personal computer maker Raspberry Pi plans London listing

    The company behind Britain's best-selling personal computer is preparing the ground for a spring listing which is expected to value it at more than £370m.

    The trading arm of the Raspberry Pi Foundation has hired bankers from Stifel and Liberum to advise on a London float after securing a $45m (£33m) investment in September.

    The Cambridge-based foundation offloaded stakes to Lansdowne Partners and the Ezrah Charitable Trust to fund product development and marketing after seeing booming demand for its miniature personal computers during lockdown.

  • Mozilla Privacy Blog: Mozilla files comments on UK Data Protection Consultation

    Mozilla recently submitted its comments to a public consultation on reforming the UK’s data protection regime launched by the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport. With the public consultation, titled ‘Data: A New Direction’, the UK government set out to re-evaluate the UK’s approach to data protection after no longer being bound by the bloc’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). We took this opportunity to share our thoughts on data stewardship and the role effective regulation can play in addressing the lopsided power dynamics between large data collectors and users.

    For Mozilla, privacy is not optional. It is an integral aspect of our Manifesto, which states that individuals’ security and privacy on the internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional. This is why privacy is at the core of our product work and why we have long promoted robust data protection in our policy and advocacy work. Further, Mozilla’s Data Futures Lab is exploring alternative approaches to data governance and promoting data stewardship through original research and support to builders.

  • 42 things I learned from building a production database

    In 2017, I went to Facebook on a sabbatical from my faculty position at Yale. I created a team to build a storage system called Delos at the bottom of the Facebook stack (think of it as Facebook’s version of Chubby). We hit production with a 3-person team in less than a year; and subsequently scaled the team to 30+ engineers spanning multiple sub-teams. In the four years that I led the team (until Spring 2021), we did not experience a single severe outage (nothing higher than a SEV3). The Delos design is well-documented in two academic papers (in OSDI 2020 and SOSP 2021). Delos is currently replacing all uses of ZooKeeper at Facebook.

    Here are some of the things I learned as the tech lead for Delos. My intent in publishing this is to help others in similar roles (leading teams that are building new infra at large companies); much of it may not generalize to different settings.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • C: sigprocmask Function Usage

    You may have heard about socket programming in C. One of the socket functions is the “sigprocmask” function. This function has been usually utilized in the code to inspect or alter the signal mask of the calling function. The signal mask is a term used for a group of signals that are presently blocked and cannot be conveyed for the calling function. Such kind of signal is known as “Blocked Signals.” You can say that a process can still receive the blocked signals, but it will not be used until they are unblocked and released, i.e., raised. Until then, it will be pending. Therefore, within today’s guide, we will be discussing the use of the sigprocmask function in C programming. Let’s have a start. After the Ubuntu 20.04 successful login, you need to launch the shell of the Ubuntu 20.04 system first after the login. So, try out the “Ctrl+Alt+T” shortcut simply on the desktop screen. It will launch the terminal shell for you in some seconds. Make sure to update your system using the apt package of your system. After that, you have to execute the “touch” instruction along with the file name you want to generate, i.e., to create the C file via the shell. This newly created file can be found in the “home” folder of your system’s file explorer. You can try opening it with the “text” editor to create code in it. Another way to open it in the shell is using the “GNU Nano” editor using the “nano” keyword with a file name as demonstrated beneath.

  • C: sigaction function usage

    A sigaction() is a function that allows to call/observe or examine a specific action associated with a particular signal. It is thought to consider a signal and sigaction function on the same page. But in reality, it has not occurred. The signal() function does not block other signals when the current handler’s execution is under process. At the same time, the sigaction function can block other signals until the current handler has returned.

  • delegation of authority from the systems programming perspective – Ariadne's Space

    As I have been griping on Twitter lately, about how I dislike the design of modern UNIX operating systems, an interesting conversation about object capabilities came up with the author of musl-libc. This conversation caused me to realize that systems programmers don’t really have a understanding of object capabilities, and how they can be used to achieve environments that are aligned with the principle of least authority. In general, I think this is largely because we’ve failed to effectively disseminate the research output in this area to the software engineering community at large — for various reasons, people complete their distributed systems degrees and go to work in decentralized finance, as unfortunately, Coinbase pays better. An unfortunate reality is that the security properties guaranteed by Web3 platforms are built around object capabilities, by necessity – the output of a transaction, which then gets consumed for another transaction, is a form of object capability. And while Web3 is largely a planet-incinerating Ponzi scheme run by grifters, object capabilities are a useful concept for building practical security into real-world systems. Most literature on this topic try to describe these concepts in the framing of, say, driving a car: by default, nobody has permission to drive a given car, so it is compliant with the principle of least authority, meanwhile the car’s key can interface with the ignition, and allow the car to be driven. In this example, the car’s key is an object capability: it is an opaque object, that can be used to acquire the right to drive the car. Afterwards, they usually go on to describe the various aspects of their system without actually discussing why anybody would want this.

  • Pip Install: Install and Remove Python Packages
  • A dog-cat-horse-turtle problem

    Sometimes the text-processing problems posted on Stack Exchange have so many solutions, it's hard to decide which is best. A problem like that was posted in the "Unix & Linux" section in December 2021...

Istio / Announcing Istio 1.12.2

This release fixes the security vulnerability described in our January 18th post, ISTIO-SECURITY-2022-001 as well as a few minor bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.12.1 and Istio 1.12.2. Read more Also: ISTIO-SECURITY-2022-001

Android Leftovers

Redis vs. MongoDB: What you need to know

Databases are garnering a lot of popularity every day and are used by many organizations for a wide variety of use cases. Many organizations are employing innovative techniques to handle their data storage. These companies often shift between databases to optimize their storage and data mapping according to their business needs. Companies with growing data requirements utilize databases with dynamic functionalities. However, deciding which database is perfect for each of these companies can be very subjective. When it comes to database management, choosing between Redis and MongoDB can be relatively challenging. Read more