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Servers: Kubernetes, Uptime/Availability Ranks, and EdgeX Foundry

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  • Kubernetes Blog: Contribution, containers and cricket: the Kubernetes 1.22 release interview

    The Kubernetes release train rolls on, and we look ahead to the release of 1.23 next week. As is our tradition, I'm pleased to bring you a look back at the process that brought us the previous version.

    The release team for 1.22 was led by Savitha Raghunathan, who was, at the time, a Senior Platform Engineer at MathWorks. I spoke to Savitha on the Kubernetes Podcast from Google, the weekly* show covering the Kubernetes and Cloud Native ecosystem.

    Our release conversations shine a light on the team that puts together each Kubernetes release. Make sure you subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts so you catch the story of 1.23.

    And in case you're interested in why the show has been on a hiatus the last few weeks, all will be revealed in the next episode!

  • Most Reliable Hosting Company Sites in November 2021

    Rackspace had the most reliable hosting company site in November 2021, with an average connection time of just 8ms across the month and no failed requests. Rackspace has appeared in the top 10 most reliable hosting company sites every month of the past 12 months, and has taken the number one spot in five of those. Rackspace offers a wide variety of cloud hosting solutions from over 40 data centres across the Americas, Europe, Asia and Australia.

    [...]

    Nine of the top 10 hosting company sites used Linux in October, continuing the dominance of Linux. In ninth place, New York Internet (NYI) used FreeBSD.

  • EdgeX Foundry Announces Jakarta, the Project’s First Long Term Support Release - Linux Foundation

    EdgeX Foundry, a Linux Foundation project under the LF Edge project umbrella, today announced the release of version 2.1 of EdgeX, codenamed ‘Jakarta.’ The project’s ninth release, it follows the recent Ireland release, which was the project’s second major release (version 2.0). Jakarta is significant in that it is EdgeX’s first release to offer long term support (LTS).

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • C: sigprocmask Function Usage

    You may have heard about socket programming in C. One of the socket functions is the “sigprocmask” function. This function has been usually utilized in the code to inspect or alter the signal mask of the calling function. The signal mask is a term used for a group of signals that are presently blocked and cannot be conveyed for the calling function. Such kind of signal is known as “Blocked Signals.” You can say that a process can still receive the blocked signals, but it will not be used until they are unblocked and released, i.e., raised. Until then, it will be pending. Therefore, within today’s guide, we will be discussing the use of the sigprocmask function in C programming. Let’s have a start. After the Ubuntu 20.04 successful login, you need to launch the shell of the Ubuntu 20.04 system first after the login. So, try out the “Ctrl+Alt+T” shortcut simply on the desktop screen. It will launch the terminal shell for you in some seconds. Make sure to update your system using the apt package of your system. After that, you have to execute the “touch” instruction along with the file name you want to generate, i.e., to create the C file via the shell. This newly created file can be found in the “home” folder of your system’s file explorer. You can try opening it with the “text” editor to create code in it. Another way to open it in the shell is using the “GNU Nano” editor using the “nano” keyword with a file name as demonstrated beneath.

  • C: sigaction function usage

    A sigaction() is a function that allows to call/observe or examine a specific action associated with a particular signal. It is thought to consider a signal and sigaction function on the same page. But in reality, it has not occurred. The signal() function does not block other signals when the current handler’s execution is under process. At the same time, the sigaction function can block other signals until the current handler has returned.

  • delegation of authority from the systems programming perspective – Ariadne's Space

    As I have been griping on Twitter lately, about how I dislike the design of modern UNIX operating systems, an interesting conversation about object capabilities came up with the author of musl-libc. This conversation caused me to realize that systems programmers don’t really have a understanding of object capabilities, and how they can be used to achieve environments that are aligned with the principle of least authority. In general, I think this is largely because we’ve failed to effectively disseminate the research output in this area to the software engineering community at large — for various reasons, people complete their distributed systems degrees and go to work in decentralized finance, as unfortunately, Coinbase pays better. An unfortunate reality is that the security properties guaranteed by Web3 platforms are built around object capabilities, by necessity – the output of a transaction, which then gets consumed for another transaction, is a form of object capability. And while Web3 is largely a planet-incinerating Ponzi scheme run by grifters, object capabilities are a useful concept for building practical security into real-world systems. Most literature on this topic try to describe these concepts in the framing of, say, driving a car: by default, nobody has permission to drive a given car, so it is compliant with the principle of least authority, meanwhile the car’s key can interface with the ignition, and allow the car to be driven. In this example, the car’s key is an object capability: it is an opaque object, that can be used to acquire the right to drive the car. Afterwards, they usually go on to describe the various aspects of their system without actually discussing why anybody would want this.

  • Pip Install: Install and Remove Python Packages
  • A dog-cat-horse-turtle problem

    Sometimes the text-processing problems posted on Stack Exchange have so many solutions, it's hard to decide which is best. A problem like that was posted in the "Unix & Linux" section in December 2021...

Istio / Announcing Istio 1.12.2

This release fixes the security vulnerability described in our January 18th post, ISTIO-SECURITY-2022-001 as well as a few minor bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.12.1 and Istio 1.12.2. Read more Also: ISTIO-SECURITY-2022-001

Android Leftovers

Redis vs. MongoDB: What you need to know

Databases are garnering a lot of popularity every day and are used by many organizations for a wide variety of use cases. Many organizations are employing innovative techniques to handle their data storage. These companies often shift between databases to optimize their storage and data mapping according to their business needs. Companies with growing data requirements utilize databases with dynamic functionalities. However, deciding which database is perfect for each of these companies can be very subjective. When it comes to database management, choosing between Redis and MongoDB can be relatively challenging. Read more