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Free Software Leftovers

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  • Germany's new coalition government backs the Public Money, Public Code initiative - Neowin

    Following the elections in September, Germany is set to get a new coalition government made up of the Social Democrats, Alliance 90/The Greens, and the Free Democratic Party. According to The Document Foundation, which has been reading the coalition agreement, the new government will embrace the notion of Public Money, Public Code (PMPC), a concept that has been promoted by the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) for a number of years.

  • Digital Markets Act: MEPs vote for interoperable messengers - Market Research Telecast [Ed: Original in German. Automated translation.]

    Large online platforms with essential services such as Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft, Airbnb and Booking.com with a market capitalization of over 80 billion euros are subject to significantly stricter competition requirements. The lead Committee for Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) in the EU Parliament supported this course on Tuesday.

    A new antitrust instrument is intended to deter dominant “gatekeepers” in the network from engaging in unfair practices. According to the line of the MPs for the planned Digital Markets Act (DMA), which still has to be formally confirmed in a plenary session of parliament in mid-December, “gatekeepers” should make their messenger services and other accompanying products such as news feeds on social networks interoperable in the future .

  • Tidied up: Emacs - a great-grandfather of text editors has a new online home - Market Research Telecast [Ed: Automated translation]

    The Dutch web developer and science philosopher Thomas FK Jorna seems to be a fan of old-school text editors: in any case, he has given the text editor Emacs, programmed in C and Lisp, a new online presence, on which friends of Plaintext start with the documentation on GNU Emacs , GNU Elisp as well as an org manual for organizing life in pure markup and a somewhat more complex manual for the LaTeX editor AUCTeX.

    Modern shop window for Emacs & Co.
    According to the GitHub entry, Jorna was obviously tired of handling the old-fashioned Emacs manual and wanted a more modern implementation, which he created himself without further ado.

  • 5 free Photoshop alternatives for Windows | PCWorld

    A long-time favorite of Linux users, the GIMP image editor is now available on all platforms. While its interface isn’t exactly friendly to beginners — especially if you’re used to other programs — it’s at least as powerful as Photoshop for standard image editing tasks.

  • Open source advent calendar: the Libreoffice office suite - Market Research Telecast [Ed: Automated translation]

    This is an advent calendar for techies. In the fully commercialized digital world, almost everything belongs to a large Internet corporation. Their software is neither open nor free. As an alternative, there is this small island of the open source world: software whose code is publicly visible and can be independently checked for possible security gaps and backdoors. Software that can be freely used, distributed and improved. Often the drive for work is simply the joy of providing something useful to society.

    Short portraits of open source projects will be published on heise online from December 1st to December 24th. These are about the functions of the respective software, the pitfalls, the history, the background and the financing. Some projects are backed by an individual, others by a loosely organized community, a tightly managed foundation with full-time employees or a consortium. The work is entirely voluntary, or it is financed through donations, cooperation with Internet companies, government funding or an open source business model. Regardless of whether it is a single application or a complex ecosystem, whether a PC program, app or operating system – the diversity of open source is overwhelming.

  • The History of Hackathons: A Digital Evolution
  • Open-Source-Adventskalender: Die Play-Store-Alternative F-Droid [Ed: Automated translation]

    This is an advent calendar for techies. In the fully commercialized digital world, almost everything belongs to a large Internet corporation. Their software is neither open nor free. As an alternative, there is this small island of the open source world: software whose code is publicly visible and can be independently checked for possible security gaps and backdoors. Software that can be freely used, distributed and improved. Often the drive for work is simply the joy of providing something useful to society.

    Short portraits of open source projects will be published on heise online from December 1st to December 24th. These are about the functions of the respective software, the pitfalls, the history, the background and the financing. Some projects are backed by an individual, others by a loosely organized community, a tightly managed foundation with full-time employees or a consortium. The work is entirely voluntary, or it is financed through donations, cooperation with Internet companies, government funding or an open source business model. Regardless of whether it is a single application or a complex ecosystem, whether a PC program, app or operating system – the diversity of open source is overwhelming.

  • Bring an old phone back to life with a free Android alternative | The Star

    Your phone's hardware is still in good shape, but the manufacturer has stopped supporting the software. In cases like these, you should consider installing an alternative Android version so that you can continue making the best of a perfectly good phone.

    Smartphone manufacturers are notorious for ending Android updates after two to three years, despite phones being capable of longer lifespans.

    The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) has been leading an upcycling initiative for Android phones with the goal of preventing e-waste by extending the lifespan of Android phones using free software.

    Two alternatives that offer enhanced data protection are CalyxOS, which has a focus on security, and LineageOS, which is designed to run on as many devices as possible, according to guidance from the FSFE.

    There are also alternatives to Google Play when it comes to getting apps for your Android phone. For example, there’s the F-Droid store where all the software is free and open source.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • C: sigprocmask Function Usage

    You may have heard about socket programming in C. One of the socket functions is the “sigprocmask” function. This function has been usually utilized in the code to inspect or alter the signal mask of the calling function. The signal mask is a term used for a group of signals that are presently blocked and cannot be conveyed for the calling function. Such kind of signal is known as “Blocked Signals.” You can say that a process can still receive the blocked signals, but it will not be used until they are unblocked and released, i.e., raised. Until then, it will be pending. Therefore, within today’s guide, we will be discussing the use of the sigprocmask function in C programming. Let’s have a start. After the Ubuntu 20.04 successful login, you need to launch the shell of the Ubuntu 20.04 system first after the login. So, try out the “Ctrl+Alt+T” shortcut simply on the desktop screen. It will launch the terminal shell for you in some seconds. Make sure to update your system using the apt package of your system. After that, you have to execute the “touch” instruction along with the file name you want to generate, i.e., to create the C file via the shell. This newly created file can be found in the “home” folder of your system’s file explorer. You can try opening it with the “text” editor to create code in it. Another way to open it in the shell is using the “GNU Nano” editor using the “nano” keyword with a file name as demonstrated beneath.

  • C: sigaction function usage

    A sigaction() is a function that allows to call/observe or examine a specific action associated with a particular signal. It is thought to consider a signal and sigaction function on the same page. But in reality, it has not occurred. The signal() function does not block other signals when the current handler’s execution is under process. At the same time, the sigaction function can block other signals until the current handler has returned.

  • delegation of authority from the systems programming perspective – Ariadne's Space

    As I have been griping on Twitter lately, about how I dislike the design of modern UNIX operating systems, an interesting conversation about object capabilities came up with the author of musl-libc. This conversation caused me to realize that systems programmers don’t really have a understanding of object capabilities, and how they can be used to achieve environments that are aligned with the principle of least authority. In general, I think this is largely because we’ve failed to effectively disseminate the research output in this area to the software engineering community at large — for various reasons, people complete their distributed systems degrees and go to work in decentralized finance, as unfortunately, Coinbase pays better. An unfortunate reality is that the security properties guaranteed by Web3 platforms are built around object capabilities, by necessity – the output of a transaction, which then gets consumed for another transaction, is a form of object capability. And while Web3 is largely a planet-incinerating Ponzi scheme run by grifters, object capabilities are a useful concept for building practical security into real-world systems. Most literature on this topic try to describe these concepts in the framing of, say, driving a car: by default, nobody has permission to drive a given car, so it is compliant with the principle of least authority, meanwhile the car’s key can interface with the ignition, and allow the car to be driven. In this example, the car’s key is an object capability: it is an opaque object, that can be used to acquire the right to drive the car. Afterwards, they usually go on to describe the various aspects of their system without actually discussing why anybody would want this.

  • Pip Install: Install and Remove Python Packages
  • A dog-cat-horse-turtle problem

    Sometimes the text-processing problems posted on Stack Exchange have so many solutions, it's hard to decide which is best. A problem like that was posted in the "Unix & Linux" section in December 2021...

Istio / Announcing Istio 1.12.2

This release fixes the security vulnerability described in our January 18th post, ISTIO-SECURITY-2022-001 as well as a few minor bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.12.1 and Istio 1.12.2. Read more Also: ISTIO-SECURITY-2022-001

Android Leftovers

Redis vs. MongoDB: What you need to know

Databases are garnering a lot of popularity every day and are used by many organizations for a wide variety of use cases. Many organizations are employing innovative techniques to handle their data storage. These companies often shift between databases to optimize their storage and data mapping according to their business needs. Companies with growing data requirements utilize databases with dynamic functionalities. However, deciding which database is perfect for each of these companies can be very subjective. When it comes to database management, choosing between Redis and MongoDB can be relatively challenging. Read more