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Games: Pokémon, Roundup, and Some More Titles on GNU/Linux

  • Bridging Game Worlds With The ‘Impossible’ Pokémon Trade | Hackaday

    Transferring hard-earned Pokémon out of the second generation GameBoy game worlds into the ‘Advance Era’ cartridges (and vice versa) has never been officially supported by Nintendo, however [Goppier] has made these illicit trades slightly easier for budding Pokémon trainers by way of a custom PCB and a healthy dose of reverse engineering.

    Changes to the data structure between Generation II on the original GameBoy (Pokémon Gold, Silver and Crystal) and Generation III on the GameBoy Advance (Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, FireRed, LeafGreen and Emerald) meant that trades between these cartridges was never a possibility – at least not through any legitimate means. In contrast, Pokémon trades are possible between the first and second generation games, as well as from Generation III and beyond, leaving the leap from Gen II to Gen III as an obvious missing link.

  • Punk Wars, Axis & Allies 1942 Online, Melvor Idle, Unpacking … - itsfoss.net

    One more to liven up the December bridge, and that is that there is nothing more entertaining to pass the time than to play a game and that is partly Linux Play, our premiere native games section for Linux with this, its monthly edition with the best that came out in November. Including construction and survival title and Punk wars, the classic war strategy of Axis & Allies 1942 Online, the RPG hardcore Melvor idle… And a lot more, without forgetting the free title with which we close the list and that this time transfers the television phenomenon of The Squid Game to PC controls under the name of Crab Game. Linux Play!

  • NeuroNet: Mendax Proxy gets some first footage, mixing elements of Your Grace & Reigns | GamingOnLinux

    NeuroNet: Mendax Proxy is an upcoming adventure that the developer claims blends together elements found in the likes of Your Grace, Reigns and Astrologaster into something new.

    Set to launch in 2022, NeuroNet sees you take control of an AI charged with managing a city called Catena. You will need to make quick-fire decisions that impact the future and the prosperity of its citizens, with every choice and decision taken having a lasting effect on those you meet and the city's status. Lots of cyberpunk theming going on here with a new trailer giving a look into what to expect you can see below.

  • The Jackie and Daria update for Spiritfarer lands December 13 | GamingOnLinux

    The biggest update yet for the award-winning Spiritfarer lands on December 13, with plenty of new content. Spiritfarer is a casual thoughtful experience about being a ferrymaster for the deceased. You build up a boat, explore and care for various spirits before letting them go.

    With the new update coming the developer said it is the biggest yet with a new island to explore, there's two new spirits to make friends with and a hospital to bring back from the brink. On top of that there's also some sort of new platforming event and new upgrades for your ferry.

More in Tux Machines

Chile citizens: Support these constitutional proposals for free software and user privacy by Feb 1

Chile is in the midst of governmental changes, and with these changes comes the opportunity for the people of Chile to make their voices heard for long-term benefits to their digital rights and freedoms. Chilean activists have submitted three constitutional proposals relating to free software and user freedom, but they need signatures in order to have these proposals submitted to the constitutional debate. We encourage free software community members in Chile to have a look at these proposals, and sign those that uphold digital freedom and autonomy. The deadline for collecting signatures is February 1st. Some further explanation and other information gathered by one of our community members, Felix Freeman, is included below. The English version of Felix's message is provided below. Read more

GNU poke 2.0 released

I am happy to announce a new major release of GNU poke, version 2.0. This release is the result of a full year of development. A lot of things have changed and improved with respect to the 1.x series; we have fixed many bugs and added quite a lot of new exciting and useful features. See the complete release notes at https://jemarch.net/poke-2.0-relnotes.html for a detailed description of what is new in this release. We have had lots of fun and learned quite a lot in the process; we really wish you will have at least half of that fun using this tool! Read more

LWN Articles on Linux Kernel (Liberated Thursday)

  • Resurrecting fbdev [LWN.net]

    The Linux framebuffer device (fbdev) subsystem has long languished in something of a purgatory; it was listed as "orphaned" in the MAINTAINERS file and saw fairly minimal maintenance, mostly driven by developers working elsewhere in the kernel graphics stack. That all changed, in an eye-opening way, on January 17, when Linus Torvalds merged a change to make Helge Deller the new maintainer of the subsystem. But it turns out that the problems in fbdev run deep, at least according to much of the rest of the kernel graphics community. By seeming to take on the maintainer role in order to revert the removal of some buggy features from fbdev, Deller has created something of a controversy. Part of the concern within the graphics community is the accelerated timeline that these events played out on. Deller posted his intention to take over maintenance of the framebuffer on Friday, January 14, which received an ack from Geert Uytterhoeven later that day. Two days later, before any other responses had come in, Deller sent a pull request to Torvalds to add Deller as the fbdev maintainer, which was promptly picked up. On January 19, Deller posted reversions of two patch sets that removed scrolling acceleration from fbdev. In the meantime, those reversions had already been made in Deller's brand new fbdev Git tree.

  • The first half of the 5.17 merge window [LWN.net]

    As of this writing, just short of 7,000 non-merge commits have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 5.17 release. The changes pulled thus far bring new features across the kernel; read on for a summary of what has been merged during the first half of the 5.17 merge window.

  • Struct slab comes to 5.17 [LWN.net]

    The page structure is at the core of the memory-management subsystem. One of these structures exists for every page of physical memory in the system; they are used to track the status of memory as it is used (and reused) during the lifetime of the system. Physical pages can adopt a number of different identities over time; they can hold user-space data, kernel data structures, DMA buffers, and so on. Regardless of how a page is used, struct page is the data structure that tracks its state. These structures are stored in a discontiguous array known as the system memory map. There are a few problems that have arisen with this arrangement. The page structure was significantly reorganized for 4.18, but the definition of struct page is still a complicated mess of #ifdefs and unions with no mechanisms to ensure that the right fields are used at any given time. The unlucky developer who needs to find more space in this structure will be hard put to understand which bits might be safe to use. Subsystems are normally designed to hide their internal data structures, but struct page is heavily used throughout the kernel, making any memory-management changes more complicated. One possible change — reducing the amount of memory consumed by page structures by getting rid of the need for a structure for every page — is just a distant dream under the current organization. So there are a lot of good reasons to remove information from struct page and hide what remains within the memory-management subsystem. One of the outcomes from the folio discussions has been a renewed desire to get a handle on struct page, but that is not a job for the faint of heart — or for the impatient. Many steps will be required to reach that goal. The merging of the initial folio patches for 5.16 was one such step; the advent of struct slab in 5.17 is another.

PETget now PKGget

The traditional package manager in Puppy Linux is the "Puppy Package Manager", often just known as the "PPM". EasyOS has a derivative of the PPM, named "PETget". However, I have never been entirely happy with that name, as the package manager can install virtually any type of package -- .deb, .rpm. .tgz, .tar.zst, .tar.xz, etc., as well as .pet packages. Read more