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Debian and Ubuntu

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  • Install WPS Office on Debian 11 Bullseye or 10 Buster Linux

    The free office suite “WPS Office Free” which was earlier known as Kingsoft Office Free is one of the best free alternatives available for Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. It is not open source like LibreOffice but readily available for Linux systems. Here we learn the commands or steps to install WPS Office on Debian 11 Bullseye.

    The WPS office package supports and opens all documents saved in Microsoft file types such as DOC, DOCX, XLS, XLSX, PPT, and PPTX. Functionally, the three modules offer a professional range of services: from the spell checker, thesaurus and mail merge function via formula editor, WordArt function, and target value search for tables to saving presentations as MPEG videos. The creation of PDFs is also possible with “WPS Office Free”.

  • How to Install Zend OPcache in Debian and Ubuntu

    This article was earlier written for APC (Alternative PHP Cache), but APC is deprecated and no longer working with PHP 5.4 onwards, now you should use OPcache for better and faster performance as explained in this article…

    OpCache is an advanced caching module based on opcode that works similar to other caching solutions. It significantly improves PHP performance, and your website by extension, by storing your site’s pre-compiled PHP pages in shared memory. This eliminates the need for PHP to constantly load these pages on each request by the server.

  • How to install the latest version of nano text editor - Unixcop the Unix / Linux the admins deams

    First, install Homebrew from the project’s website. In our chaos, I have opted for Debian for the demo. So, read our post

    How to install Homebrew on Debian 11?

    After the installation has been successful. It is then convenient to uninstall the version of nano that we have on the system.

  • Ana Guerrero Lopez, Aurelien Jarno, EDF, ESA & Debian toxic woman

    Here in the Debian Community News Team, we are disgusted about violence against women. Yet we also want to tell the truth: every time a toxic woman like Ana Guerrero Lopez makes a conspiracy, many innocent women and volunteers suffer.

    Ana thinks she is special. She works for a nuclear company in France. Her husband works for the European Space Agency. Therefore, she can write this horrible defamation and she will never suffer any consequences. Other women will suffer for Ana's arrogance.

    Ana never created any real software for Debian users. Ana became a Debian Developer by going to DebConf and meeting the men. Ninety-nine percent of the code in a Debian release comes from real developers. People like Ana are imposters, they take our code, they put it into packages and they create these big titles for themselves to hide the developers who did the real work.

  • Revisiting default initramfs compression
    Hi all,
    
    some time ago, the default compressor for initramfs was changed
    from lz4 -9 to zstd -19. This caused significant problems:
    
    - it is very slow
    - it uses a lot of memory
    
    The former is a problem for everyone, the latter means that
    zstd just crashes on a Pi Zero.
    
    This is an analysis of what we have in terms of time spent,
    memory spent, and file size achieved, and where we can
    go from here.
    
  • Ubuntu Rethinking Its Initramfs Compression Strategy - Phoronix

    While Ubuntu switched from LZ4 to Zstd for compressing its initramfs, they now are finding they were too aggressive in defaulting to Zstd with the highest compression level of 19. Due to speed and memory consumption concerns, they are looking at lowering their Zstd compression level.

    Ubuntu had switched from LZ4 at its maximum compression level of 9 to going with Zstd, which is wonderful, and has a maximum level of 19. But with that highest compression level they have found the initramfs decompression to be too slow and consumes too much memory. In particular, for low-end devices and embedded hardware like the Raspberry Pi Zero with just 512MB of RAM, it just crashes.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • C: sigprocmask Function Usage

    You may have heard about socket programming in C. One of the socket functions is the “sigprocmask” function. This function has been usually utilized in the code to inspect or alter the signal mask of the calling function. The signal mask is a term used for a group of signals that are presently blocked and cannot be conveyed for the calling function. Such kind of signal is known as “Blocked Signals.” You can say that a process can still receive the blocked signals, but it will not be used until they are unblocked and released, i.e., raised. Until then, it will be pending. Therefore, within today’s guide, we will be discussing the use of the sigprocmask function in C programming. Let’s have a start. After the Ubuntu 20.04 successful login, you need to launch the shell of the Ubuntu 20.04 system first after the login. So, try out the “Ctrl+Alt+T” shortcut simply on the desktop screen. It will launch the terminal shell for you in some seconds. Make sure to update your system using the apt package of your system. After that, you have to execute the “touch” instruction along with the file name you want to generate, i.e., to create the C file via the shell. This newly created file can be found in the “home” folder of your system’s file explorer. You can try opening it with the “text” editor to create code in it. Another way to open it in the shell is using the “GNU Nano” editor using the “nano” keyword with a file name as demonstrated beneath.

  • C: sigaction function usage

    A sigaction() is a function that allows to call/observe or examine a specific action associated with a particular signal. It is thought to consider a signal and sigaction function on the same page. But in reality, it has not occurred. The signal() function does not block other signals when the current handler’s execution is under process. At the same time, the sigaction function can block other signals until the current handler has returned.

  • delegation of authority from the systems programming perspective – Ariadne's Space

    As I have been griping on Twitter lately, about how I dislike the design of modern UNIX operating systems, an interesting conversation about object capabilities came up with the author of musl-libc. This conversation caused me to realize that systems programmers don’t really have a understanding of object capabilities, and how they can be used to achieve environments that are aligned with the principle of least authority. In general, I think this is largely because we’ve failed to effectively disseminate the research output in this area to the software engineering community at large — for various reasons, people complete their distributed systems degrees and go to work in decentralized finance, as unfortunately, Coinbase pays better. An unfortunate reality is that the security properties guaranteed by Web3 platforms are built around object capabilities, by necessity – the output of a transaction, which then gets consumed for another transaction, is a form of object capability. And while Web3 is largely a planet-incinerating Ponzi scheme run by grifters, object capabilities are a useful concept for building practical security into real-world systems. Most literature on this topic try to describe these concepts in the framing of, say, driving a car: by default, nobody has permission to drive a given car, so it is compliant with the principle of least authority, meanwhile the car’s key can interface with the ignition, and allow the car to be driven. In this example, the car’s key is an object capability: it is an opaque object, that can be used to acquire the right to drive the car. Afterwards, they usually go on to describe the various aspects of their system without actually discussing why anybody would want this.

  • Pip Install: Install and Remove Python Packages
  • A dog-cat-horse-turtle problem

    Sometimes the text-processing problems posted on Stack Exchange have so many solutions, it's hard to decide which is best. A problem like that was posted in the "Unix & Linux" section in December 2021...

Istio / Announcing Istio 1.12.2

This release fixes the security vulnerability described in our January 18th post, ISTIO-SECURITY-2022-001 as well as a few minor bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.12.1 and Istio 1.12.2. Read more Also: ISTIO-SECURITY-2022-001

Android Leftovers

Redis vs. MongoDB: What you need to know

Databases are garnering a lot of popularity every day and are used by many organizations for a wide variety of use cases. Many organizations are employing innovative techniques to handle their data storage. These companies often shift between databases to optimize their storage and data mapping according to their business needs. Companies with growing data requirements utilize databases with dynamic functionalities. However, deciding which database is perfect for each of these companies can be very subjective. When it comes to database management, choosing between Redis and MongoDB can be relatively challenging. Read more