Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Standard Office

Filed under
KDE

June 21th 2005 was the day KOffice released version 1.4. I highlight that release because it was the first release where KOffice switched its native format to the OpenDocument Format. That would become an official ISO standard in May 2006.

The direct gains may be that there is no conversion step required in loading docs from other application in their native format, but the long term gains are much more substantial.

Being able to work with all the industry leaders on the creation and maintenance of the format (and there are quite a lot in the Technical Committee of ODF) allows us to level the playing field and let office applications compete on features and ease of use instead of on who uses what suite and what your partners have chosen.

This means real competition where the end user is the clear winner with lower prices for better quality software.

It won't surprise you that I believe that KOffice has the upper hand due to its superior design and foundation.

Several months ago Microsoft saw that people noticed that customers demanded the shared and open fileformat as governments started choosing ODF by droves.

So, today we are at a point that the ISO member countries have a vote they have to cast in 5 months whether the Microsoft format (OOXML or Echma 376) indeed becomes an ISO standard.

Full Story.

Also:

During FISL 8.0 I caught up with PostgreSQL contributor Josh Berkus who was there to present on PostgreSQL and meet up with the local PostgreSQL community. Josh is a member of the PostgreSQL core team and works at Sun Microsystems as part of their open source database team. Over lunch, Josh shared how KDE plays an important role in the release coordination process which Josh oversees.

Josh explained, "We create a press kit for every PostgreSQL release that is sent out to 600-700 people by email in up to 11 different languages. The translation is done by our translation community which is made up of teams of 1-4 people per language."

How does KDE factor into this process?

Josh Berkus: KDE Aids The PostgreSQL Team


More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

today's howtos

Julia v1.5.0 has been released

Thank you to everyone who made this year’s JuliaCon great! As a parting gift, the Julia developers are pleased to announce the release of Julia v1.5.0, the fifth minor release in the 1.x series. Jeff and Stefan put together a blog post highlighting some of the most exciting new features in 1.5. Check it out! As usual, binaries are available for all of your favorite platforms (Linux, macOS, Windows, and FreeBSD) at https://julialang.org/downloads. As a minor release, v1.5.0 contains no breaking changes, only new features, performance improvements, and marginal, undisruptive changes in behavior. You can also see the NEWS file for the full set of changes. Note that like 1.5, like its predecessor 1.4, does not have long term support. As of this release 1.4 has been effectively superseded by 1.5, which means that there will not likely be any further 1.4.x releases. Julia 1.0 is still currently the only long term support version. We encourage everyone to give it a try. Packages can test with 1.5.0 on CI by specifying 1.5 on Travis, AppVeyor, Cirrus, and GitHub Actions. As always, let us know in the issue tracker if you run into any issues. Read more Also: Julia 1.5 has been released

Meet Super Container OS, a Debian-Based Live Distro with a Built-In Container Engine

I told you I love new projects, right? Well, today I have a brand-new distro that I’d like to introduce you to, called Super Container OS, and targeted at developers who want to run containerized apps. The Super Container OS developer Harshad Joshi pinged me earlier on Twitter earlier to check out his new distro, which he says it’s a live and installable Linux OS that comes pre-loaded with a container engine powered by Docker and systemd-nspawn. Based on the Bufferstack.IO computing platform, Super Container OS wants to be the ideal tool for those who want to create, deploy and distribute apps that can run on IIoT Gateways, servers, or even virtual machines. Now that Container Linux from CoreOS is no more, I guess we need more alternatives. Super Container OS is based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” operating system series and aims to make deploying, running and managing containerized applications easier by using OS level virtualization. Read more Also: Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - July 2020