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Is it just me...

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WebSite

Is it just me or is tuxmachines.org slowing down?

Not the stories or reviews, but downloading any page or story. At work its worse than at home but in the last 2-3 weeks, slow city.

Any one else finding this?

Most, if not all, other sites I've bookmarked just flash onto the screen in seconds. tuxmachines.org at work takes about 1 minute and about 45 seconds at home.

Just an observation, no critisism implied.

regards,
Nicsmr

New theme...

The new theme looks great.

Unfortunatly still slow. Won't stop me from visiting though.

Cheers,
Nicsmr

re: slow?

I think the google ads are slowing things down a bit, and visitors are increasing. My pipe is being stretched to its limits I'm afraid. But I can't afford to move. I received two whole donations in the last year and no one is clicking the google ads.

I wonder if the new theme is slowing it down some as well? I'll change back when I have the time in the next few days and see if that help.

---

Edit: How's this theme? I think it's one of the lightest available for drupal.

More in Tux Machines

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I was wondering why, in the QA team, there are various newcomers willing to contribute, but so little interaction in the mailing list. If a person would like to join the QA team, like many other Fedora teams, one of the first things they are supposed to do (at least as a good practice, if not as prescribed by the team SOP) is to send an introductory email to the team’s mailing list. And it is simple to spot that—after the introduction email and eventually being sponsored into the FAS group—in most cases the newcomers don’t send any other mail in the following times. Why? I was wondering: is it ever possible that a newcomer is so skilled that he/she doesn’t need to ask any clarification to other team members? Is it possible that the documentation we have on the wiki or on docs.f.o. is sufficient to teach a newcomer all the tasks he/she is supposed to perform? How things work? No doubts? Any specific curiosity? All the processes, all the tasks, are they so clear? Wow… or… there is something strange. Read more

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today's howtos

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