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Windows linked to... kidney stones?

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Microsoft

Jon Parshall, chief operating officer for CodeWeavers, a leading developer of Wine, which allows users to run Windows applications without Windows, recently suffered two weeks of mind-numbing agony and extraordinary urethral discomfort as a result of at least one or possibly more kidney stones. The cause: Windows.

In a CodeWeavers press-release, the company reported that Parshall began suffering the kidney stones in March, at the height of his company's development of a new version of CrossOver Mac, a breakthrough product that allows Mac OS X users to install and use popular Windows applications without the presence of the Windows operating system.

"It was like I was descending into the eighth level of hell," Parshall explained, "my days were filled with mouth-drying, white-hot shards of torment that stretched from my lower back across to my abdomen and beyond. Sweat-soaked nights were spent rolling in bed in agony. I pled for a second of respite in the form of sleep that never came."

No, it wasn't just the normal pain that comes with exposure to Visual Studio. Despite the agony of dealing with Windows programming, Parshall foolishly attempted to go to work the next morning.

Full Story.

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