Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Windows linked to... kidney stones?

Filed under
Microsoft

Jon Parshall, chief operating officer for CodeWeavers, a leading developer of Wine, which allows users to run Windows applications without Windows, recently suffered two weeks of mind-numbing agony and extraordinary urethral discomfort as a result of at least one or possibly more kidney stones. The cause: Windows.

In a CodeWeavers press-release, the company reported that Parshall began suffering the kidney stones in March, at the height of his company's development of a new version of CrossOver Mac, a breakthrough product that allows Mac OS X users to install and use popular Windows applications without the presence of the Windows operating system.

"It was like I was descending into the eighth level of hell," Parshall explained, "my days were filled with mouth-drying, white-hot shards of torment that stretched from my lower back across to my abdomen and beyond. Sweat-soaked nights were spent rolling in bed in agony. I pled for a second of respite in the form of sleep that never came."

No, it wasn't just the normal pain that comes with exposure to Visual Studio. Despite the agony of dealing with Windows programming, Parshall foolishly attempted to go to work the next morning.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6″ module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review

The BQ Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition is not the debut Canonical must have envisaged for Ubuntu Phone, in the early days of the platform’s development. It’s a perfectly functional smartphone for the most part, and we like the concept of scopes, but the hardware is humdrum, performance is sluggish, and the software running on it is rough and ready, and full of holes. We’ll be tracking the progress of Ubuntu Phone with interest – it surely must get better than this – but this first device is one to write off to experience. Read more