Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

E-mail today is 69 percent spam

Filed under
Security

Bickering among software companies over who should set e-mail standards has allowed the amount of worldwide spam to jump to 69 percent.

A Philadelphia-based tech entrepreneur named Meng Wong helped bring the issue to light in 2003 when he and a friend developed a program that identified spammers and offered security, which they offered for free on the Internet.

Microsoft, Yahoo Inc., and Cisco Systems were also working on similar ideas, but Microsoft decided to partner with Meng to develop one specification designed to help eliminate domain spoofing and provide greater protection against phishing schemes.

"Stopping spam is something everybody wants to do and it has been this hard," Wong told the Washington Post.

However, the dissent over who establishes a common protocol remains in the industry, which has allowed the amount of spam messages to reach 69 percent worldwide from 50 percent in July 2003.

UPI

More in Tux Machines

Popcorn Time Makes Watching Movies Safer with Integrated VPN

Popcorn Time, an application that lets users stream movies and TV shows directly from torrents without having to download them, has been upgraded to version 0.3.6 and is now available for download. Read more

4MRecover 11.0 Beta OS Can Help Users Recover Lost Files

4MRecover 11.0 Beta, a new distribution based on 4MLinux that is designed to be used specifically for file recovery, is now available for download and testing. Read more

Android Leftovers

Will New Google Android Live TV Outfox Apple?

Google then rolled out its $35 Chromecast dongle, a streaming device, in mid-2013. Google's new Android TV operating system is expected to make it easier for software developers to move apps from mobile devices to TVs. Read more