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E-mail today is 69 percent spam

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Security

Bickering among software companies over who should set e-mail standards has allowed the amount of worldwide spam to jump to 69 percent.

A Philadelphia-based tech entrepreneur named Meng Wong helped bring the issue to light in 2003 when he and a friend developed a program that identified spammers and offered security, which they offered for free on the Internet.

Microsoft, Yahoo Inc., and Cisco Systems were also working on similar ideas, but Microsoft decided to partner with Meng to develop one specification designed to help eliminate domain spoofing and provide greater protection against phishing schemes.

"Stopping spam is something everybody wants to do and it has been this hard," Wong told the Washington Post.

However, the dissent over who establishes a common protocol remains in the industry, which has allowed the amount of spam messages to reach 69 percent worldwide from 50 percent in July 2003.

UPI

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