Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux 5.16

Filed under
Linux

Not a lot here since -rc8, which is not unexpected. We had that extra
week due to the holidays, and it's not like we had lots of last-minute
things that needed to be sorted out.

So this mainly contains some driver fixes (mainly networking and
rdma), a cgroup credential use fix, a few core networking fixes, a
couple of last-minute reverts, and some other random noise. The
appended shortlog is so small that you might as well scroll through
it.

This obviously means that the merge window for 5.17 opens tomorrow,
and I'm happy to say I already have several pending early pull
requests.  I wish I had even more, because this merge window is going
to be somewhat painful due to unfortunate travel for family reasons.
So I'll be doing most of it on the road on a laptop - something I
generally try to avoid.

That said, the merging part of the merge window works perfectly well
on a laptop, it's just that I normally really want to do more local
build testing between merges than a laptop really allows me to do. So
the main downside during travel is that I end up relying much more on
the automated build testing in the cloud. And so really hope that
everything has been properly cooking in linux-next so that there are
no unnecessary issues that pop up when things hit my tree.

Of course, realistically our automated build testing is so good
anyway, and people have been pretty good about linux-next, that maybe
my local builds aren't _that_ important. I do end up occasionally
hitting issues that should never have made it as far as my tree, but
it's not like it's a common - or generally serious - issue.

Knock wood.

Anyway, I don't expect any real issue, but I'll probably be jetlagged
and in odd timezones, so my response time might be "variable".

But hey, before that merge window even opens, you still have some time
to give a shiny new kernel release some TLC and testing.

                Linus

Read more

Linux 5.16 Released With Many Intel & AMD Additions

  • Linux 5.16 Released With Many Intel & AMD Additions, Memory Folios, AMX, FUTEX2

    As expected the Linux 5.16 kernel has been promoted to stable.

    Linux 5.16 has many new features including the FUTEX2 futex_waitv system call for helping Steam Play (and Wine), memory folios have been mainlined, AMD Ryzen 6000 mobile series support is getting into better shape, Intel Alder Lake S graphics are now considered stable, Intel AMX support for Sapphire Rapids has landed, big AMD Ryzen with Radeon graphics performance improvements, and a wealth of other hardware improvements.

The 5.16 kernel has been released

  • The 5.16 kernel has been released

    Linus Torvalds has released the 5.16 kernel, as expected. Significant changes in 5.16 include the futex_waitv() system call, cluster-aware CPU scheduling, some internal memcpy() hardening, memory folios, the DAMON operating schemes user-space memory-management mechanism, and much more. See the LWN merge-window summaries (part 1, part 2) and the KernelNewbies 5.16 page for details.

Linux Kernel 5.16 Released! What’s New?

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Released! What’s New?

    Linux Kernel 5.16 is finally here, and while it doesn’t bring lots of features or improvements, there are a handful of features that might matter to Linux gamers and desktop users. Here’s everything new in the Linux Kernel 5.16.

    One of the release highlights is the improvements in the performance of Intel and AMD CPUs and GPUs. Apart from that, ARM platforms like the Raspberry Pi have also been improved. The AMD, Intel CPU, and GPU claims were tested by our good friends at Phoronix, and the results showed great improvements.

By Jean-Luc Aufranc (CNXSoft)

  • Linux 5.16 Release – Main Changes, Arm, RISC-V and MIPS architectures

    Not a lot here since -rc8, which is not unexpected. We had that extra week due to the holidays, and it’s not like we had lots of last-minute things that needed to be sorted out.

    So this mainly contains some driver fixes (mainly networking and rdma), a cgroup credential use fix, a few core networking fixes, a couple of last-minute reverts, and some other random noise. The appended shortlog is so small that you might as well scroll through it.

    This obviously means that the merge window for 5.17 opens tomorrow, and I’m happy to say I already have several pending early pull requests. I wish I had even more, because this merge window is going to be somewhat painful due to unfortunate travel for family reasons. So I’ll be doing most of it on the road on a laptop – something I generally try to avoid.

Linux Kernel 5.16 Release Improves Gaming

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Delivers Gaming Boost, Nintendo Joy-Con Drivers + More - OMG! Ubuntu!

    The Linux Kernel just received its major update of the year — and if you’re a gamer, it’s a corker!

    Linus Torvalds announced the availability of Linux kernel 5.16 exactly where he always announces it: the Linux kernel mailing list.

    The Linux 5.16 release was delayed by week or so due to the appearance of a red-suited bearded fellow, something Torvalds notes in his announcement where he quips: “we had that extra week due to the holidays, and it’s not like we had lots of last-minute things that needed to be sorted out”.

    So what’s new?

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Release Improves Gaming & Adds Support for New-Gen Hardware - It's FOSS News

    Linux Kernel 5.16 is an interesting release for both gamers and desktop users.

    The changes introduced aren’t massive, but useful upgrades for users with the latest hardware and looking to get better performance in terms of gaming.

    Linux Kernel 5.16: What’s New?

    The support for the latest generation hardware from team red (AMD) and team blue (Intel) are some major additions to this release. You will notice improvements for the CPU and GPU as well.

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Released, Speeds up Wine Games

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux kernel 5.16. The release offers plenty of new hardware support and features to get excited about.

    As expected Linus Torvalds announced Linux kernel 5.16 to stable in providing the latest features, hardware support, and other improvements ahead of the new 2022 Linux distribution releases, so let’s see what’s new.

    Playing video games on Linux can sometimes be a difficult process. Of course, gaming platforms such as Steam, allow users to play Windows games on Linux with the help of the projects like Proton. However, there is another option – Wine. With that said, the latest version of the Linux kernel brings a new system call, futex_waitv(), which results in better gaming performance while playing both native Linux games or Windows games on Wine.

    Looking at the CPUs, the biggest addition is that Intel’s Advanced Matrix Extensions support is now finally stable. This new extension introduces a unique and performant approach to matrix operations that are frequently used to demonstrate the high-performance capabilities of GPUs.

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 is out now bringing the futex2 work to help Linux Gaming | GamingOnLinux

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux Kernel 5.16, bringing with it the usual assortment of new hardware support and improvements everywhere. Plus, there's something big for Linux gaming fans.

    The one many have no doubt been waiting for is the inclusion of Collabora's work on FUTEX2 with futex_waitv(). This is supposed to help Linux gaming with Proton / Wine and also Native Linux gaming too. As Collabora developer André Almeida previously described it: "The use case of this syscall is to allow low level locking libraries to wait for multiple locks at the same time. This is specially useful for emulating Windows' WaitForMultipleObjects. A futex_waitv()-based solution has been used for some time at Proton's Wine (a compatibility layer to run Windows games on Linux). Compared to a solution that uses eventfd(), futex was able to reduce CPU utilization for games, and even increase frames per second for some games. This happens because eventfd doesn't scale very well for a huge number of read, write and poll calls compared to futex. Native game engines will benefit of this as well, given that this wait pattern is common for games.".

Linux kernel 5.16 now available with Nintendo...

  • Linux kernel 5.16 now available with Nintendo Switch controller drivers

    The Linux kernel is at the heart of countless devices and operating systems, including Android phones and tablets, Chromebooks, desktop Linux distributions, and much more. New versions are usually released every few months, and now version 5.16 is available to try out.

    Linus Torvalds, the creator and lead maintainer of the Linux kernel, wrote on the kernel mailing list (via omg! ubuntu!), “Not a lot here since [v5.16 release candidate 8], which is not unexpected. We had that extra week due to the holidays, and it’s not like we had lots of last-minute things that needed to be sorted out. So this mainly contains some driver fixes (mainly networking and rdma), a cgroup credential use fix, a few core networking fixes, a couple of last-minute reverts, and some other random noise.”

    Perhaps the most important change in this release is a new kernel system called ‘futex2,’ short for ‘fast user mutex.’ It allows applications to create mutexes, semaphores, conditional variables, and other fast-performing synchronization mechanisms. This new feature could improve performance of games running in the Wine compatibility layer (as well as native Linux games), but Wine hasn’t implemented this yet, so we’ll have to wait and see how that turns out.

Linux Kernel 5.16 Released

  • Linux Kernel 5.16 Released

    Linux Kernel 5.16 is now available for download. Linus Torvalds announced the availability of Linux kernel 5.16. You can download Linux kernel 5.16 right now from the kernel.org website. The Linux 5.16 release was delayed by a week

Linux 5.16 released: Bootlin contributions

  • Linux 5.16 released: Bootlin contributions

    Linux 5.16 has been released on January 9. As usual, our recommended reading to learn more about this release is the corresponding Kernelnewbies.org page and the two articles from LWN covering the 5.16 merge window: part 1 and part 2.

André Almeida (Collabora) on Linux Kernel 5.16

  • Kernel 5.16: A new release for a new year

    What's more refreshing than a new kernel release to start a new year? 2021 was a year with all sorts of challenges, from fighting the pandemic to deep diving complex technical problems. In case you missed it, have a look at our Year in Review for a summary of the accomplishments made by our kernel team over the last year.

    With kernel 5.16 made available earlier this month, the community has once again produced a release full of great features, like improving memory management performance via folio's API and better scheduler awareness of CPU topologies that share L2/L3 caches. You can read more about these, and other highlights, over at LWN (part1, part2) and at Kernel Newbies.

    More importantly, this latest release sees the culmination of two projects that had been in development for some time by our kernel team. Collaborans contributed both the new futex syscall and the new fanotify event, two new APIs which took long hours of research and cooperation with the kernel development community to come to fruition. It's great to see the hard work of our kernel experts paying off!

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.18-rc7

	
From	Linus Torvalds 
Date	Sun, 15 May 2022 18:15:42 -0700
Subject	Linux 5.18-rc7
share 0
So things continue to be fairly calm, and as such this is likely the
last rc before 5.18 unless something bad happens next week.

All the stats here look normal, with the bulk of it being random
driver updates (network drivers, gpu, usb, etc).

There's a few filesystem fixes, some core networking, and some code
kernel stuff. And some selftest updates.

Sortlog appended, nothing really stands out (the most exciting thing
last week was literally that Andrew has started using git, which will
make my life easier, but that doesn't affect the *code*)

Please give it one last week of testing, so that we'll have a nice
solid 5.18 release.

                 Linus

Read more

today's howtos

  1. Finding files in Ubuntu 22.04

    In computing, file placement is an important activity to perform as you may forget the file location. Ubuntu 22.04 supports various built-in commands to trace down your files. However, the graphical user interface may also be used to find files.

  2. How to Convert SVG or PDF File to Base64?

    Apart from simple text, the image files or documents can also be converted to the Base64 format. These entities can then be stored securely anywhere you want. In this article, we would like to share the methods of converting the SVG files and PDF files to Base64 using the Python programming language in Ubuntu 20.04. First, we will introduce you briefly to these file formats, followed by the procedure of converting them to Base64.

  3. How to install DataGrip 2022 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install DataGrip 2022 on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  4. GDISK Command-Line Options

    The GDISK command in Linux is used to partition the drives of your system. Moreover, it can also be used to list down the existing partitions and display relevant information about them. In this guide, we will be talking about the different command-line options that are available with the GDISK command on a Linux Mint 20.3 system.

  5. Mapfile Bash Linux Command

    The bash shell Mapfile command is often known as a reading array. The primary purpose is to read standard input lines and store them in an indexed array variable. Mapfile must also read from substitution (<<) rather than a pipe. In addition, as compared to a read loop, bash Mapfile is a much faster and more convenient solution. It returns 1 if the execution of the command gets successful and 0 in case it is not successful. If we don’t specify an array name, the bash Mapfile variable will be targeting the array variable by default. Thus, we have decided to cover some examples using the mapfile instruction on the bash.

  6. Resolve Issue: Bash Bad Substitution

    You may have received the Bad substitution syntax problem while developing Bash scripts. After browsing through forums, you may discover that you are not alone; other individuals are encountering the same mistake. It’s a typographical fault that happens when you run your Shell script, and it can happen for a variety of reasons. The wrong use of instruction substitution and erroneous characters appended to the program are two major reasons for this. Let’s see how we can make our shell script cause this error and how to resolve it. Get started with the new bash file created with Ubuntu’s “touch” query and open it within the “GNU Nano” editor.

  7. Resolve Issue: Bash Unary Operator Expected

    Errors have a diverse number of types and reasons when it comes to bash programming. One of those errors is the “unary operator expected” error in bash programming. When evaluating expressions in conditional declarations, you may run into the “unary operator expected” issue. The reasons for this error “bash unary operator expected” might be diverse. We’ll start by talking about what’s creating the problem. Following that, we’ll go over a couple of options for resolving this problem. Let’s get started with today’s article by creating a new bash file in Ubuntu 20.04 system. For this, we need to utilize the “touch” instruction within the shell terminal and name the file “unary.sh”.

today's leftovers

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #182

    Welcome to this week's Linux weekly roundup. We had another full week in the world of Linux releases with Fedora 36, Bluestar Linux 5.17.7, ALT Linux 10.0, and LXLE Focal beta. I hope you have a wonderful week and enjoy every moment!

  • libiconv - News: libiconv 1.17 released [Savannah]

    GNU libiconv 1.17 is released.

  • PS4 9.60 and PS5 5.10 Firmware updates released, do not update if possible - Wololo.net

    So as always, we (and several prominent members of the hacking scene) recommend you do not update your console, if you can, and if you’re expecting to Jailbreak it eventually.

  • Best PlayStation 2 (PS2) Emulators for Android in 2022

    The Google Play Store is packed with interesting games, but most of them pale in comparison with the best PlayStation 2 titles, such as Silent Hill 2, Ico, Shadow of the Colossus, the Ratchet and Clank series, Final Fantasy X, Kingdom Hearts 1 & 2, Wild Arms, or Persona 4, just to give some examples. These and many other games are still fun to play, even though it’s been more than two decades since Sony released the PlayStation 2 console to great success. You can play them even if you don’t own the console or any of its successors’ thanks to PlayStation 2 emulators for Android.

  • Best Roblox Anime Games

    Roblox is a unique gaming platform with a library that has millions of games created by a community of millions of developers, allowing endless hours of gameplay. If you are a fan of anime and looking for games that resemble them then we have mentioned some of the top anime games in this article.

  • Did you know Twitter has an open-source arm? This is what it's been up to [Ed: Openwashing of a truly sinister and manipulative entity]
  • KlipperScreen: All You Need to Know [Ed: Not about KDE per se. This could be a trademark problem because of KDE. Klipper started in the 1990s.]

    KlipperScreen is a program that runs on Klipper firmware and provides a GUI to control your printer. Read on to learn more about it!

OpenVMS 9.2 hits production status for x86-64

VMS Software Inc. has announced the release of OpenVMS 9.2, the first production-supported release for commercial off-the-shelf x86 hardware. The expectation is that customers will deploy the new OS [PDF] into VMs. Most recent hypervisors are supported, including VMware (Workstation 15+, Fusion 11+ and ESXi 6.7+), KVM (tested on CentOS 7.9, openSUSE Leap 15.3, and Ubuntu 18.04), and Oracle VirtualBox 6.1. Read more