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Nina Reiser Couldn’t Win

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Reiser

Nina Reiser vanished sometime during the day on September 5, 2006, after taking her children to visit Hans Reiser. Though Nina is still missing, investigators in Oakland, California eventually gathered enough evidence against Hans Reiser to charge him with her murder.

According to the Wikipedia page about Hans, the evidence included blood found on a bag in Hans Reiser’s car that matched Nina’s DNA, a missing passenger seat from Hans Reiser’s vehicle, and less concrete indicators — the legendary computer programmer had become a true crime enthusiast around the time his wife disappeared. Among Hans Reiser’s effects were Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets, by David Simon, and Masterpieces of Murder, written by Jonathan Goodman.

The couple married in 1999. Nina was from Russia, where she’d been trained as an obstetrician and gynecologist. At the time of her disappearance, she had custody of the couple’s children. The Reisers’ divorce had become final in 2004. Nina was the one who filed, saying in part that Hans was gone so much that the children didn’t really know him.

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