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Free Software Events in Europe and Australia

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Software
  • The FSFE at FOSDEM 2022 - FSFE

    This year's edition will be kicked off by a talk of Masafumi Ohta, teaching on Free Software license and compliances at the University of Electro-Communications in Japan at 13:00 CET. In his talk, Ohta addresses the issue on "How to teach OSS licenses and compliances at a university".

    At 13:30 CET, Italo Vignoli, a well-known Free Software advocate and a marketing and public relations consultant, gives a presentation on "Why the pandemic could help FOSS, but was a win for proprietary software".

  • FOSDEM 2022 schedule with embedded Linux, IoT, automotive... sessions - CNX Software

    While typically taking place in Brussels, Belgium, FOSDEM 2022 will take place online just like FOSDEM 2021 due to COVID-19 restrictions. The good news is that it means anybody can attend it live from anywhere in the world, and makes it more like “FOSDIM”, replacing European with International, in “Free and Open Source Developers’ European Meeting”.

    FOSDEM 2022 will take place on February 5-6 with 637 speakers, 718 events, and 103 tracks. I’ve made my own little virtual schedule below mostly with sessions from the Embedded, Mobile and Automotive devroom, but also other devrooms including “Computer Aided Modeling and Design”, “FOSS on Mobile Devices”, “Libre-Open VLSI and FPGA”, and others.

  • Talking digital with Brian Kernighan | Opensource.com

    Brian Kernighan has written many popular books about programming, computers, and technology. My own bookshelf includes several books authored or co-authored by Kernighan, including The C Programming Language, Unix: A History and A Memoir, The AWK Programming Language, and others. I just added another book by Kernighan, Understanding the Digital World: What You Need to Know about Computers, the Internet, Privacy, and Security, Second Edition, published in 2021 by Princeton University Press.

  • Australia/NZ Linux Meetings « etbe - Russell Coker

    I am going to start a new Linux focused FOSS online meeting for people in Australia and nearby areas. People can join from anywhere but the aim will be to support people in nearby areas.

    To cover the time zone range for Australia this requires a meeting on a weekend, I’m thinking of the first Saturday of the month at 1PM Melbourne/Sydney time, that would be 10AM in WA and 3PM in NZ. We may have corner cases of daylight savings starting and ending on different days, but that shouldn’t be a big deal as I think those times can vary by an hour either way without being too inconvenient for anyone.

    Note that I describe the meeting as Linux focused because my plans include having a meeting dedicated to different versions of BSD Unix and a meeting dedicated to the HURD. But those meetings will be mainly for Linux people to learn about other Unix-like OSs.

Brian Kernighan on the origins of Unix

  • Brian Kernighan on the origins of Unix

    Once again, the COVID pandemic has forced linux.conf.au to go virtual, thus depriving your editor of a couple of 24-hour, economy-class, middle-seat experiences. This naturally leads to a set of mixed feelings. LCA has always put a priority on interesting keynote talks, and that has carried over into the online event; the opening keynote for LCA 2022 was given by Brian Kernighan. Despite being seen as a founder of our community, Kernighan is rarely seen at Linux events; he used his LCA keynote to reminisce for a while on where Unix came from and what its legacy is.

    He began by introducing Bell Labs, which was formed by US telecommunications giant AT&T to carry out research on how to improve telephone services. A lot of inventions came out of Bell Labs, including the transistor, the laser, and fiber optics. Such was the concentration of talent there that, at one point, Claude Shannon and Richard Hamming shared an office. Kernighan joined Bell Labs in 1967, when there were about 25 people engaged in computer-science research.

    Early on, Bell Labs joined up with MIT and General Electric to work on a time-sharing operating system known as Multics. As one might have predicted, the attempted collaboration between a research lab, a university, and a profit-making company did not work all that well; Multics slipped later and later, and Bell Labs eventually pulled out of the project. That left two researchers who had been working on Multics — Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie — without a project to work on.

    After searching for a machine to work on, Thompson eventually found an old PDP-7, which was already obsolete at that time, to do some work on filesystem design. The first Unix-like system was, in essence, a test harness to measure filesystem throughput. But he and Ritchie later concluded that it was something close to the sort of timesharing system they had been trying to build before. This system helped them to convince the lab to buy them a PDP-11/20 for further development. [Brian Kernighan] The initial plan was to create a system for document processing, with an initial focus of, inevitably, preparing patent applications. The result was "recognizably Unix" and was used to get real work done.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.18-rc7

	
From	Linus Torvalds 
Date	Sun, 15 May 2022 18:15:42 -0700
Subject	Linux 5.18-rc7
share 0
So things continue to be fairly calm, and as such this is likely the
last rc before 5.18 unless something bad happens next week.

All the stats here look normal, with the bulk of it being random
driver updates (network drivers, gpu, usb, etc).

There's a few filesystem fixes, some core networking, and some code
kernel stuff. And some selftest updates.

Sortlog appended, nothing really stands out (the most exciting thing
last week was literally that Andrew has started using git, which will
make my life easier, but that doesn't affect the *code*)

Please give it one last week of testing, so that we'll have a nice
solid 5.18 release.

                 Linus

Read more

today's howtos

  1. Finding files in Ubuntu 22.04

    In computing, file placement is an important activity to perform as you may forget the file location. Ubuntu 22.04 supports various built-in commands to trace down your files. However, the graphical user interface may also be used to find files.

  2. How to Convert SVG or PDF File to Base64?

    Apart from simple text, the image files or documents can also be converted to the Base64 format. These entities can then be stored securely anywhere you want. In this article, we would like to share the methods of converting the SVG files and PDF files to Base64 using the Python programming language in Ubuntu 20.04. First, we will introduce you briefly to these file formats, followed by the procedure of converting them to Base64.

  3. How to install DataGrip 2022 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install DataGrip 2022 on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  4. GDISK Command-Line Options

    The GDISK command in Linux is used to partition the drives of your system. Moreover, it can also be used to list down the existing partitions and display relevant information about them. In this guide, we will be talking about the different command-line options that are available with the GDISK command on a Linux Mint 20.3 system.

  5. Mapfile Bash Linux Command

    The bash shell Mapfile command is often known as a reading array. The primary purpose is to read standard input lines and store them in an indexed array variable. Mapfile must also read from substitution (<<) rather than a pipe. In addition, as compared to a read loop, bash Mapfile is a much faster and more convenient solution. It returns 1 if the execution of the command gets successful and 0 in case it is not successful. If we don’t specify an array name, the bash Mapfile variable will be targeting the array variable by default. Thus, we have decided to cover some examples using the mapfile instruction on the bash.

  6. Resolve Issue: Bash Bad Substitution

    You may have received the Bad substitution syntax problem while developing Bash scripts. After browsing through forums, you may discover that you are not alone; other individuals are encountering the same mistake. It’s a typographical fault that happens when you run your Shell script, and it can happen for a variety of reasons. The wrong use of instruction substitution and erroneous characters appended to the program are two major reasons for this. Let’s see how we can make our shell script cause this error and how to resolve it. Get started with the new bash file created with Ubuntu’s “touch” query and open it within the “GNU Nano” editor.

  7. Resolve Issue: Bash Unary Operator Expected

    Errors have a diverse number of types and reasons when it comes to bash programming. One of those errors is the “unary operator expected” error in bash programming. When evaluating expressions in conditional declarations, you may run into the “unary operator expected” issue. The reasons for this error “bash unary operator expected” might be diverse. We’ll start by talking about what’s creating the problem. Following that, we’ll go over a couple of options for resolving this problem. Let’s get started with today’s article by creating a new bash file in Ubuntu 20.04 system. For this, we need to utilize the “touch” instruction within the shell terminal and name the file “unary.sh”.

today's leftovers

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #182

    Welcome to this week's Linux weekly roundup. We had another full week in the world of Linux releases with Fedora 36, Bluestar Linux 5.17.7, ALT Linux 10.0, and LXLE Focal beta. I hope you have a wonderful week and enjoy every moment!

  • libiconv - News: libiconv 1.17 released [Savannah]

    GNU libiconv 1.17 is released.

  • PS4 9.60 and PS5 5.10 Firmware updates released, do not update if possible - Wololo.net

    So as always, we (and several prominent members of the hacking scene) recommend you do not update your console, if you can, and if you’re expecting to Jailbreak it eventually.

  • Best PlayStation 2 (PS2) Emulators for Android in 2022

    The Google Play Store is packed with interesting games, but most of them pale in comparison with the best PlayStation 2 titles, such as Silent Hill 2, Ico, Shadow of the Colossus, the Ratchet and Clank series, Final Fantasy X, Kingdom Hearts 1 & 2, Wild Arms, or Persona 4, just to give some examples. These and many other games are still fun to play, even though it’s been more than two decades since Sony released the PlayStation 2 console to great success. You can play them even if you don’t own the console or any of its successors’ thanks to PlayStation 2 emulators for Android.

  • Best Roblox Anime Games

    Roblox is a unique gaming platform with a library that has millions of games created by a community of millions of developers, allowing endless hours of gameplay. If you are a fan of anime and looking for games that resemble them then we have mentioned some of the top anime games in this article.

  • Did you know Twitter has an open-source arm? This is what it's been up to [Ed: Openwashing of a truly sinister and manipulative entity]
  • KlipperScreen: All You Need to Know [Ed: Not about KDE per se. This could be a trademark problem because of KDE. Klipper started in the 1990s.]

    KlipperScreen is a program that runs on Klipper firmware and provides a GUI to control your printer. Read on to learn more about it!

OpenVMS 9.2 hits production status for x86-64

VMS Software Inc. has announced the release of OpenVMS 9.2, the first production-supported release for commercial off-the-shelf x86 hardware. The expectation is that customers will deploy the new OS [PDF] into VMs. Most recent hypervisors are supported, including VMware (Workstation 15+, Fusion 11+ and ESXi 6.7+), KVM (tested on CentOS 7.9, openSUSE Leap 15.3, and Ubuntu 18.04), and Oracle VirtualBox 6.1. Read more