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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • Let's Try to Install Raspberry Pi 5.10 on VirtualBox!

    Today we will see how to install Raspberry Pi with VirtualBox. The famous Linux OS comes as an embedded system which usually utilized in projects. For testing and simulation environments having Pi in VirtualBox will be a good idea. As per official documentation, this Debian derivative can be a buildup for Microsoft, Apple OS, and Linux-based environments. For Linux Ubuntu can be customized as a Pi- environment. But, here we are discussing to buildup a dedicated os with the help of Virtual Box. Let’s take a brief on Pi’s features.

  • How to build, run, and manage container images with Podman | FOSS Linux

    Linux Containers have been around for some time but were introduced in the Linux kernel in 2008. Linux containers are lightweight, executable application components that combine app source code with OS libraries and dependencies required to run the code in different environments.

    Developers use containers as an application packaging and delivery technology. One key attribute of containers is combining lightweight application isolation with the flexibility of image-based deployment methods.

    RHEL based systems like CentOS and Fedora Linux implements containers using technologies such as control groups for resource management, namespaces for system process isolation, SELinux for security management. These technologies provide an environment to produce, run, manage and orchestrate containers. In addition to these tools, Red Hat offers command-line tools like podman and buildah for managing container images and pods.

  • How To Install ELK Stack on AlmaLinux 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install ELK Stack on AlmaLinux 8. For those of you who didn’t know, The ELK Stack is an acronym for a combination of three widely used open-source projects: E=Elasticsearch, L=Logstash, and K=Kibana. With the addition of Beats, the ELK Stack is now known as the Elastic Stack. the ELK platform allows you to consolidate, process, monitor, and perform analytics on data generated from multiple sources in a way that is fast, scalable, and reliable.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the ELK Stack on an AlmaLinux 8. You can follow the same instructions for Rocky Linux.

  • Install Minikube On Ubuntu 22.04 / 20.04 LTS | Tips On UNIX

    minikube is an open-source tool, also a local Kubernetes focusing on making it easy to learn and develop for Kubernetes.

    This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to install minikube on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Ubuntu 22.04.

  • How to know which Linux Kernel Version is installed in my System - TREND OCEANS

    There are a couple of reasons why you should know your Linux kernel version, It could be a handful when you want to install the Linux header, and even it’s a pretty common error for the VMware Workstation to fail in case of a missing Linux header.

    In this article, you will see how to check the kernel version, alongside you will see the steps to install Linux header on your system.

  • How to create and run a shell script in Linux and Ubuntu - Coffee Talk: Java, News, Stories and Opinions

    It’s pretty easy to run a batch file on windows.

    Just just create a file, change the extension to .bat, and either call the script in PowerShell or double click to execute it. Windows users are spoiled.

    If you want to create a script and run it in Ubuntu, a few extra steps are involved.

  • Install Puppet Server & Agent on Rocky Linux or AlmaLinux 8 - Linux Shout

    In this tutorial, we will learn the steps to install Puppet Server on AlmaLinux or Rocky Linux 8 distros using the command terminal.

    Puppet is an open-source project with enterprise support, it allows admins to automate the configuration of a single server or computer to a large network of systems; Ansible and Foreman are a few of its alternatives.

    When developers and administrators have to configure multiple servers at a time with similar configurations then instead of repeating the same tasks on each system one by one they use special configuration managers such as Puppet. Ideally, many tasks can be automated with it using Puppet’s Domain-Specific Language (DSL) — Puppet code — which you can use with a wide array of devices and operating systems. It was developed in 2005 by Puppet Labs, Portland, Oregon; written in Ruby and designed to be cross-platform. Any login term enterprise operating system can be used to host Puppet servers such as OracleLinux, RedHat, SuSE, Ubuntu, Debian AlmaLinux, and Rocky Linux. Systems running Windows can also be configured and managed with Puppet, with some limitations.

  • How to Use GitLab’s Built-In Sentry Error Tracking Service – CloudSavvy IT

    Sentry is a popular error-tracking platform that gives you real-time visibility into issues in your production environments. GitLab’s Error Reporting feature lets you bring Sentry reports into your source control platform, offering a centralized view that unifies Sentry errors and GitLab issues.

    The feature originally relied on an integration with an existing Sentry service, either the official Sentry.io or your own self-hosted server. This changed with GitLab 14.4 which added a lightweight Sentry-compatible backend to GitLab itself. You no longer need an actual Sentry installation to get error reports into GitLab.

    Here’s how to get started with the integrated Sentry backend. Before we proceed, it’s worth mentioning that this capability might not be right for you if you’re already acquainted with the Sentry dashboard. GitLab’s backend is a barebones solution which surfaces errors as a simple list. It’s best for smaller applications where you don’t want the overhead of managing a separate Sentry project.

  • Learn to Install Android Studio Step by Step on Ubuntu

    Android Studio is Android’s official development environment. The tool is designed specifically for Android devices to help you build the highest quality apps. Android applications are built on a setup developed by Google, which is known to all Android users. The IDE replaced the Eclipse tool, which was primarily used for Android development. AS IDE has been used to develop some of the most well-known Android applications.

More in Tux Machines

Canonical/Ubuntu Leftovers

  • 12-Year-Old Developer Brings Ubuntu's Unity Desktop Back to Life

    Unity 7.6 is the first major version of the Unity desktop in six years, with the previous release in May 2016. Unity is a graphical shell for the GNOME desktop environment designed and maintained by Canonical for Ubuntu. It was beautiful and innovative, but another controversial Canonical’s decision threw it out in 2017. So, since its 17.10 “Artful Aardvark” release, Ubuntu has reverted to using GNOME as the default desktop environment. In addition, the last official update from Canonical for Unity was the minor 7.4.5 version dated back in March 2019. Now, the restart of the active maintenance of the Unity 7 Desktop Environment is a fact. And this whole thing is thanks to 12-year-old Rudra Saraswat, Linux Foundation Certified Developer and Ubuntu member from India. I had used Ubuntu 17.04 back when I was 8 [years old], and I really loved Unity7, so when Unity7 was discontinued by Canonical, I wasn’t happy and wanted to bring it back. I created this project to give Unity7 a new life.

  • Star Developers are here!

    In the Snap Store, we have a fantastic community where members can discuss topics in the forum, develop snaps and help others. Currently, the Snap Store has verified accounts; verified companies have a green tick by their name to show that the snap has come from a trusted source. However, snaps from individual users were not getting the same recognition, even if a lot of care and attention has gone into developing them. To address this and give recognition to individual users in the snap community, we introduced Star Developers.

  • New Active Directory Integration features in Ubuntu 22.04 (part 4) – Scripts execution [Ed: Canonical spreads Microsoft instead of replacing it]

    Linux Active Directory (AD) integration is historically one of the most requested functionalities by our corporate users, and with Ubuntu Desktop 22.04, we introduced ADsys, our new Active Directory client. This blog post is the last of a series where we will explore the new functionalities in more detail. (Part 1 – Introduction, Part 2 – Group Policy Objects, Part 3 – Privilege Management) In this article we will focus on how you can use Active Directory to schedule startup, shutdown, login or logout scripts on your managed desktops through ADsys. In this area, as well as for all the other new features delivered by ADsys, we tried to offer a user experience as close as possible to the native one available in Microsoft Windows, with the aim of enabling IT admins to reuse the same knowledge and tools they acquired over the years to manage Ubuntu desktops.

[ANNOUNCE] wayland 1.21.0

This is the official release for Wayland 1.21.

This new release adds a new wl_pointer high-resolution scroll event,
adds a few new convenience functions, and contains a collection of
bug fixes.

This is the first release to use GitLab releases instead of the usual
wayland.freedesktop.org website. The new links are available at the
end of this email, or in the GitLab UI.

Commit history since RC1 below.

Peter Hutterer (1):
      protocol: minor clarification for axis_discrete events

Simon Ser (2):
      util: set errno when hitting WL_MAP_MAX_OBJECTS
      build: bump to version 1.21.0 for the official release

git tag: 1.21.0
Read more Also: Mike Blumenkrantz: The Doctor Is In

Open Hardware/Modding: Raspberry Pi Pico W and Arduino

  • Raspberry Pi Pico W Projects to Inspire Your Inner Maker | Tom's Hardware

    The Raspberry Pi family has grown today and now includes a $6 wireless microcontrollers, the Raspberry Pi Pico W. We’ve already had the chance to check it out and have a full Raspberry Pi Pico W review available for anyone interested in the new board. In short, we’re head over heels for the new development and it looks like we’re not alone! Several makers have had the opportunity to check out the new boards and have even shared some new Pico W projects with the community that demonstrates its potential. Today we’re taking a look at a few of them to get you excited and hopefully springboard some new ideas with their inspirational creations.

  • Where to Buy the Raspberry Pi Pico W | Tom's Hardware

    Officially launched today, the Raspberry Pi Pico W is the successor to the Raspberry Pi Pico, Raspberry Pi's first microcontroller board. Long time Raspberry Pi fans will know that a W at the end of of product name means Wi-Fi and the Pico W comes with 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi all for just $6. In our review of the Raspberry Pi Pico W we praised how easy it was to get online. Taking a mere five lines of MicroPython to connect our project to the world. The Pico W retains GPIO compatibility with the older Pico, but at this time third-party addons are rushing to patch their software libraries to work with the Pico W.

  • How to Connect Raspberry Pi Pico W to the Internet | Tom's Hardware

    The release of the Raspberry Pi Pico W brings with it an interesting opportunity. In the past if we wanted to connect a Raspberry Pi to the world, we would need one of the larger models. The Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W, and Raspberry Pi 4 were often pressed into data collection duties. The Raspberry Pi 4 is a bit of a power hog, the Zero 2 W is a bit better but still overkill for a simple information project. With the arrival of the Raspberry Pi Pico W we have a low power, microcontroller with a competent Wi-Fi chip, in the Pico form factor and only $6! So where do we start? How do we get our Raspberry Pi Pico W online, and where can we find interesting data to collect? Let us guide you through making the most of your $6 Raspberry Pi Pico W.

  • New Raspberry PI Pico released: finally the WiFi came. Hidding Bluetooth capabilities?

    Today, 30th June 2022, great news was raised from the web: a new Raspberry PI microcontroller has been released. There’s something really important in this new product. While in Jan 2021 the Foundation entered into the microcontrollers world with the RPI Pico (see Raspberry PI Pico: Foundation entering the micro-controllers universe article for the launch news), the experts have noted since the first time that something was missing. The RPI Pico was a great board, really flexible and able to perform a great number of tasks. The compatibility both with C++ and MicroPython made it the perfect development board for those wishing to reuse their experience both from other microcontrollers (like Arduino) and from the Raspberry PI Computer boards, where Python is a milestone in programming with the GPIOs. The main feature missing was that the new Raspberry PI Pico wasn’t able to connect with a network as there wasn’t any networking capability like WiFi, Ethernet or even a basic Bluetooth.

  • This large-format laser cutter was built from scratch for just $700 | Arduino Blog

    When stuck between a cheaper yet small laser cutter and splurging on a much larger one, Owen Schafer decided instead to just build one himself. The project started with Schafer sourcing a 40W CO2 laser, which differs from a diode laser in that it uses gas heated with 16,000 volts to produce a very powerful beam of light. This had the added side effect of needing a water-cooling system since the tube tends to generate ample amounts of heat. Once the laser and the necessary reflectors had been sourced, Schafer purchased aluminum extrusions and attached them with corner connectors. The head moves with the help of a gantry, wherein the X-axis slides along the Y-axis, and both are driven by NEMA17 stepper motors and a timing belt. For some added safety, he created a basic enclosure out of plywood just in case something went wrong internally.

Videos: Doom Emacs, Wayland, and FSF

  • Why Do I Choose Emacs Over Vim? It Looks Better! - Invidious

    I spent a couple of hours today playing with my Doom Emacs config. In particular, I focused on some font settings which I think help with aesthetics and with readability. In fact, I think one of the biggest reasons that I use Emacs over Vim is how Emacs renders fonts.

  • Biggest Problem With Wayland Desktop Capture - Invidious

    Wayland is continually imporving and one aspect of that is with desktop capture but right now there's a pretty annoying design flaw with the way this system functions but it can certainly be fixed

  • Fresh in the LibrePlanet archives: LibrePlanet 2022 workshop videos

    In the lead-up to LibrePlanet 2022, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) received more workshop submissions than ever before. And because our LibrePlanet schedule is often chock full of splendid talks already, we thought it best to present the workshops in our very first LibrePlanet workshop series, which ran after LibrePlanet so that they would not conflict with any talks.

  • Translators and free software, a practical introduction to OmegaT

    Professional translators are more than often taught to use proprietary tools in universities and professional groups. OmegaT has existed for 20 years as a professional Computer Aided Translation tool (CAT) and is used all around the world. This workshop will introduce participants to the concepts behind CATs and especially how they are practically put into use in OmegaT: translation memories, segmentation, exchange formats, collaborative work, etc.

  • Software localization (translation) of Web-based projects

    Software localization (translation) of Web-based projects could be a nightmare for many developers. However, this time-consuming process can be solved easily thanks to the free software tool Tolgee. Jan Cizmar will guide you through with his workshop named Web Application Localization Without Tears. He will show you how to manage localization texts in simple UI or how to take the advantage of the in-context localization feature, so you can just click & translate the text easily. “The more languages your software knows, the more of a satisfied users you have". However, current software localization in modern JS frameworks and other software is complicated and fairly time-consuming for all involved participants. Thanks to the in-context localization feature of free software project Tolgee, this tool offers easier localization process, more relevant translations delivery and finally less work for developers.

  • Installing Ourselves into LibrePlanet

    Hosted by Cristina Cochior, Karl Moubarak, and Jara Rocha of The Cell for Digital Discomfort A workshop session to map out each of our current conditions of connecting and being together, the physical-political, and technological conditions using a diagrammatic methodology. The workshop is geared towards installing ourselves into the conference's infrastructural spectralities by sharing, learning from and attuning to each others' conditions for connectivity, online participation and basic computer-mediated mundane day-to-day life. We want to pose this affirmation as an initial trigger: installing is about situating — attuning to our network of (inter-)dependencies and attuning to the dependencies with our local and vernacular but also standardized and planetary networks.