Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • #28 PrintScrn · This Week in GNOME

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from January 21 to January 28.

  • Implementing a MIME database in XXXX

    Recently, I have been working on implementing a parser for media types (commonly called MIME types) and a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice-versa. I thought this would be an interesting module to blog about, given that it’s only about 250 lines of code, does something useful and interesting, and demonstrates a few interesting xxxx concepts.

    The format for media types is more-or-less defined by RFC 2045, specifically section 5.1. The specification is not great. The grammar shown here is copied and pasted from parts of larger grammars in older RFCs, RFCs which are equally poorly defined. For example, the quoted-string nonterminal is never defined here, but instead comes from RFC 822, which defines it but also states that it can be “folded”, which technically makes the following a valid Media Type:

    text/plain;charset="hello
     world"
    

    Or so I would presume, but the qtext terminal “cannot include CR”, which is the mechanism by which folding is performed in the first place, and… bleh. Let’s just implement a “reasonable subset” of the spec instead and side-step the whole folding issue.1 This post will first cover parsing media types, then address our second goal: providing a database which maps media types to file extensions and vice versa.

  • gst-editing-services compiled in OE

    I discovered that 'gst-editing-services' is another dependency of Pitivi, added to these:
    https://bkhome.org/news/202201/more-dependencies-for-pitivi-video-editor.html
    There is no recipe in OE, so I attempted to compile it on the host system. Stuffed around for about 3 hours, unable to compile, ninja is doing something stupid.

  • More dependencies for Pitivi video editor

    This morning I posted about a complete recompile in OpenEmbedded, "revision 7":

    https://bkhome.org/news/202201/what-to-expect-in-the-next-release-of-easyos.html

    This included bumped gstreamer version, suitable to run Pitivi.

  • Wasmer 2.2 Bringing Its WebAssembly "Singlepass" Compiler To AArch64 - Phoronix

    Wasmer 2.2-rc1 is out today as the WebAssembly run-tme to "run any code on any client" with its broad platform coverage and allowing numerous programming languages from Rust to PHP to C# being able to be compiled into WebAssembly and then running on any OS or embedded into other languages for execution.

    Wasmer continues as one of the leading open-source WebAssembly runtimes with a diverse feature-set. Its project site at Wasmer.io talks up Wasmer for use from "supercharged blockchain infrastructure" to "portable ML/AI applications". Buzzwords aside, Wasmer has been a very interesting WebAssembly open-source project.

  • Alternatives to Visual Basic

    This is a list of free/libre open source software (FLOSS) alternatives to Visual Basic (part of Microsoft Visual Studio) computer programming platform. If your school is still teaching VB 6, or if you now use Ubuntu for programming classroom, we strongly suggest you to switch to either one of these alternatives. With these, one can create computer programs visually by drag and drop as well as coding just like what one can do with VB.

More in Tux Machines

7 Best Rufus Alternatives To Create Bootable USB In 2022

One of the first steps of trying out an operating system is installing the image of the same on a USB drive. Rufus is one of the most widely used tools to create bootable USBs, but you might not like it due to its UI or slow on your computer. Hence, in this article, let’s look at some of the best Rufus alternatives to create bootable USBs. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Here's what's new and changed in Kodi 20 'Nexus' Alpha 1

    Yesterday, we revealed that the next big version of Kodi had hit an important milestone. Nightly builds of Kodi 20 'Nexus' have been available for months, but now there’s a much more stable release for users to download. Although it’s only a pre-release build, and therefore will likely have some bugs to watch out for, Kodi 20 'Nexus' Alpha 1's arrival will excite a lot of people. Team Kodi is very proud of this release, and highlights the following changes and new features.

  • MiTubo 1.0: playlist support, new “website” | Mardy

    Expanding a bit on the points above, the first thing worth saying is that the choice of releasing this version as “1.0” does not mean that it's more stable than the previous ones; it just means that I'm rather satisfied with the feature set, and that I believe that the program is ready for more widespread use. This is also the reason why I decided to prepare a web page for it: mardy.it/mitubo. I didn't go for a completely separate website, unlike what I previously did for Mappero Geotagger, PhotoTeleport and Imaginario (which reminds me that I haven't been working on the latter for a long time! I should try to correct this soon!), both because this way it's simpler to publish news about it (I'll continue doing that here, instead of cross-posting in two sites), and because having it in the same domain might be mutually beneficial for the SEO ranking of the blog and of MiTubo.

  • Adriaan de Groot: Blue Systems Farewell

    Calamares serves the needs of several dozen Linux distributions, large and small. I’ve been running the Calamares project for five years now, sponsored by Blue Systems who have supported the Calamares project since its beginning and through two maintainers now. After these five years, I have decided to hand in my badge and move on to different things. This means that I’m no longer paid to spend three days a week on Calamares and my involvement is going to be dialed back to incidental-volunteer-contributor. This means that maybe I’ll finally ignore Linux distro’s and sit down to make it work for FreeBSD.

  • Elevate from a normie to an elite internet user - Invidious
  • Strengthening digital infrastructure: A policy agenda for free and open source software

    While there is little debate that digital forces are playing an increasingly crucial role in the economy, there is limited understanding of the importance of the digital infrastructure that underlies this role. Much of the discussion around digital infrastructure has focused on broadband availability (which is certainly important), but the role of free and open source software (FOSS or OSS) has gone underappreciated. FOSS—software whose source code is public, is often created by decentralized volunteers, and can be freely used and modified by anyone—has come to play a vital role in the modern economy. It is baked into technology we use every day (cars, phones, websites, etc.), as well as into various aspects of critical infrastructure including our finance and energy systems.

  • Improve legibility and reduce layout shifts with x-height adjustments

    There’s more to setting the text size on your webpages than just the CSS font-size property. It only controls the size of majuscule (“uppercase”, e.g. “A”) letters, numbers, and punctuation. The size of minuscule (“lowercase”, e.g. “a”) letters is left up to the font. [...] Unfortunately, font-size-adjust is only supported in Firefox. It has been supported by this browser for over a decade already. It was implemented in Chrome for almost half a decade, but it has been left to rot behind the Experimental Web Platform features flag. It’s not implemented in Safari.

Linux and "Open" Devices