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Google Comes Clean on Microsoft

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Google

Google today officially confirmed what many analysts have been saying for months: the Mountain View, California-based search leader is going after the software market in direct competition with Microsoft.

Reflecting the company’s explosive growth, Google’s new tagline will be “Search, Ads and Apps,” said CEO Eric Schmidt in a speech at its annual shareholders’ meeting.

Last year Google launched a package of online applications such as browser-based word processing and spreadsheet software that look much like Microsoft’s bread and butter Word and Excel programs.

Mr. Schmidt noted that computer owners have been known to lose all their data when their personal computers crash, a discouraging turn of events that could be avoided by using Google’s Internet-based applications.

“There should be a rule against this,” Mr. Schmidt said. “If you think about it from a data perspective… What you would prefer is a trusted partner to keep all the information and have it for you on every device.”

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