Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

How much ATI really paid for its Half Life 2 deal

Filed under
Gaming

IT WAS A HARD task to get to the bottom of the mystery of ATI's Half Life 2 voucher deal. It took us a lot of time and energy. We wrote about it on many occasions, and had some numbers, but now we've found out just how much ATI invested in this deal.

ATI gave Valve $2.4 million in cash for the deal. ATI also invested $1.2 million in marketing this great game. And last, but not least, was a cool $4.4 million that ATI and its partners spent for bundles.

That amounts to some $8 million dollars. This is a lot of money, I can agree, but ATI never sold so many mainstream and high end cards in its long history as when it bundled them with the justly famous voucher. It sold an incredible lot of 9800XT and 9600XT cards just because of the nice voucher. That small piece of paper convinced many people to go out and buy ATI card.

ATI actually benefited from HL2 being late. People were just buying and buying ATI cards because of the voucher and just to get the free game. So it was a win-win rather than a whinge-whinge deal for ATI, which recouped the money back from end users.

As for Nvidia, we can surely bet that Nvidia spends even more on its highly successful TWIMTBP marketing program, but Nvidia invests in many games and not in a single game only. A chapter in the history of vouchers has just ended.

theinquirer.

More in Tux Machines

SteamOS A Linux Distribution For Gaming


Picture

SteamOS is a Debian Linux kernel-based operating system in development by Valve Corporation designed to be the primary operating system for the Steam Machine game consoles. It was initially released on December 13, 2013, alongside the start of end-user beta testing of Steam Machines.
 

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

KDE Applications 14.12.3 Officially Released

KDE Applications 14.12 has been released by its makers, and it’s a regular maintenance update. It comes with a ton of bug fixes and will be soon available in various repositories. Read more

Understanding The Linux Kernel's BPF In-Kernel Virtual Machine

BPF continues marching forward as a universal, in-kernel virtual machine for the Linux kernel. The Berkeley Packet Filter was originally designed for network packet filtering but has since been extended as eBPF to support other non-network subsystems via the bpf syscall. Here's some more details on this in-kernel virtual machine. Alexei Starovoitov presented at last month's Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit in Santa Rosa about BPF as an in-kernel virtual machine. The slides have been published for those wishing to learn more about its state and capabilities. Read more

Calligra 2.9.0 is Out

Packages for the release of KDE's document suite Calligra 2.9 are available for Kubuntu 14.10. You can get it from the Kubuntu Backports PPA. They are also in our development version Vivid. Read more