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Microsoft and SanDisk to develop portable usb desktop

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Microsoft

Microsoft and flash memory maker SanDisk have teamed up to develop new portable USB flash drives that can be automatically loaded with their desktop software applications and personal settings, as well as data.

The new SanDisk USB storage devices will effectively enable users to take an image of their Windows desktops and carry it around in their pockets. The devices will plug into a USB 2.0 port of any Windows XP or Vista computer and enable users to work as if they were on their own computer.

SanDisk already offers a similar device called the U3 smart drive, which enables users to transport Windows-based applications and settings. The new device, however, represents an attempt by SanDisk and Microsoft to go a step further and create a platform that can be licensed to hardware vendors and is accessible to the entire Windows development community.

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Wizpy

With things like Wizpy, Linux has been doing this for quite some time (Persistence is another example, IIRC). This INNOVA~1 from Redmond will only debut in 2008. Talk about catch-up...

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