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Questions Answered, Questions Posed - What Happened to Tux500?

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Linux

One hundred and seven emails were actionable questions or comments concerning the Tux500 project. Those questions or comments were broken down into catagory and because they address important matters in the community, I have decided that some of them need answered sooner than I can physically get to them individually. Herein, I will address them by catagory.

How are we doing?

Not nearly as well as we projected prior to kicking off the project. By now, we had projected our community donation level to be approximately thirty five thousand dollars. This effort was not hastily arranged and executed, although there are reports to the contrary. Reading the names of those making such comments, it may be old age creeping up, but I do not specifically remember any of those people sitting in on the meetings or conference/video calls held prior to the first announcement. It seems uninformed opinion carries the same validity as documented fact here in the Linux Community. That's tough to overcome.

Upon the completion of legal requirements, the first announcement was made. Once it went live, press releases were dispatched to one hundred and eighty two publications. This of course included all the Linux News websites as well as the dead tree editions of major Linux magazines. Two of those magazines responded just inside the second week of the project. One magazine made it a point to interview at least one project leader and double-checked the links, publications and individuals with pertinent information about the project. It was with more than wishful thinking we concluded that these publications were going to report on Tux500. As time passed and we noted that no story had been mentioned in either publication, we inquired as to if there were to be a story. One publication responded by informing us the Editor was simply deciding "which direction" they would go with the story.

Dood, Where's Our Car...?



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