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Book Review: Beginning C: From Novice to Professional

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Ivor Horton is a beginner's best friend (Beginning C++ 6, Beginning Ansi C++, Beginning Java 2). And his Beginning C text is definitely no stranger to this forum as I reviewed the 3rd Edition in October 2004. What's new with the 4th Edition, and do you need it?

What's new and what's not?

As with the earlier editions, Horton still uses a command-line driven edit-compile-link-execute process. In fact, other than renaming one of chapters, the high-level content has not changed. At the publisher's Web site, you can view the book's current table of contents, download the source code, and read sample Chapter 1.

The examples still have a Windows/DOS feel, file names still point to the "C" drive, and the printing example still uses the 'stdprn' file handle. This isn't a criticism – just a statement of fact.

However, this 4th edition expects the reader to use a compiler conforming to the ISO/IEC 9899 standard – commonly referred to as C99. Horton isn't kidding about the C99 standard. A number of his examples fail miserably without a C99 compiler.

Full Story.



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