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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Fresh ransomware samples indicate REvil is back [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO]

    New ransomware samples analyzed by Secureworks' threat intelligence team are the latest indication that high-profile ransomware operation REvil is once again up and running after months of relative inactivity.

    Secureworks' Counter Threat Unit (CTU) investigated samples that were uploaded to the VirusTotal analysis service and found some showing that the developer of the code has access to REvil's source code, "reinforcing the likelihood that the threat group has reemerged," the researchers wrote in a blog post this week.

  • US-Led Seizure of RaidForums May Defy Lasting Effect on Security | TechNewsWorld

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Tuesday announced it seized the website and user database for RaidForums, a popular English-language cybercrime forum that sold access to more than 10 billion consumer records stolen in some of the world’s largest data breaches since 2015.

    The DOJ also charged the alleged administrator of RaidForums — 21-year-old Diogo Santos Coelho, of Portugal — with six criminal counts, including conspiracy, access device fraud, and aggravated identity theft.

  • Malware goes regional as attackers change tactics [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO]

    One such trend is that most recent malware attacks came from within the same region as the victim, a marked difference from previous years, according to Netskope, which believes this is a strategic tactic used by attackers to avoid geofencing filters and other prevention measures.

    [...]

    Netskope said that EXE and DLL files account for nearly half of all malware downloads as malicious actors continue to see Microsoft Windows as a prime target for attacks.

  • iOS, Android stores host more than 1.5 million 'abandoned' apps [Ed: Orphaned does not mean malicious]
  • OpenSSF Adds Open Source Package Analysis Tool Prototype

    The Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) has made available a prototype of a package analysis tool that has already identified more than 200 malicious packages uploaded to PyPI and npm software components.

  • OpenSSF announces 15 new members to tackle supply chain security challenges

    The Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) announced 15 new members from leading software development, cybersecurity, financial services, communications, and academic sectors.

  • Google to create security team for open source projects [Ed: Google works for the NSA. No security professional (a real security person) would take this seriously. Google: we worry about Open Source security! Meanwhile a Google engineer slips backdoored encryption into Linux kernel...]
  • Groundhog Day For Malware - IT Jungle [Ed: "This content is sponsored by iTech Solutions." IT Jungle has rapidly become a puff piece dump of IBM, Intel etc.]

    “The IFS just like a UNIX or Windows file system is susceptible to viruses, the i/OS is NOT.”

    Okay, this comment is pretty much false information. First, the IFS is called the Integrated File System because it’s exactly that. It literally contains ALL TEN IBM i file systems! Here they all are for good measure:

  • IBM Tackles Talent Shortage and Cybersecurity Crisis with New and Expanded Partnerships [Ed: IBM is moaning about talent shortage while laying off some of its most experienced workers]
  • Security is a pain for American Dental Association: Ransomware infection feared [Ed: The huge cost of using Microsoft Windows]

    The Black Basta crime gang has claimed it infected the American Dental Association with ransomware.

  • Microsoft closes Windows LSA hole under active attack [Ed: While the media obsesses over "Linux" (systemd) bugs that could be exploited, by a local user, Microsoft has these blunders that the media typically shies away from (zero-days, unlike Linux, and far more severe too)]
  • Microsoft patches Windows LSA spoofing zero-day under active attack (CVE-2022-26925) [Ed: With Microsoft, security is not a possibility. Microsoft security advice (that would actually work): turn off the computer until we issue a patch for the zero-day remotely-exploitable hole.]

    May 2022 Patch Tuesday is here, and Microsoft has marked it by releasing fixes for 74 CVE-numbered vulnerabilities, including one zero-day under active attack (CVE-2022-26925) and two publicly known vulnerabilities (CVE-2022-29972 and CVE-2022-22713).

  • US offers $15m reward for information about Conti ransomware gang [Ed: Microsoft Windows is costing the US taxpayers, too]
  • US, Europe formally blame Russia for data wiper attacks against Ukraine, Viasat [Ed: Windows TCO; But the Linux Foundation will carry on badmouth Linux security while taking Microsoft cash, just like Zemlin the wife. The Zemlin family bags more money from Microsoft than the Linux Foundation bags from Microsoft.]

    WhisperGate corrupts an infected Windows system's master boot record, displays a fake ransom note, and irreversibly scrambles documents based on their file extensions, according to the US government's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA). Ghostwriter, a crew thought to be connected to Russia's GRU military intelligence service, started using this strain of malware against organizations in Ukraine on January 15, we're told.

  • Crook jailed for selling stolen credentials on dark web • The Register

    The prosecution's documents [PDF] detail an unnamed, dark-web marketplace on which usernames and passwords along with personal data, including more than 330,000 dates of birth and social security numbers belonging to US residents, were bought and sold illegally.

More in Tux Machines

Proprietary Systems: Chromebooks, Windows, and Microsoft’s xClown

New GNU Releases and FSF Spring "Bulletin"

  • June GNU Spotlight with Amin Bandali: Twelve new GNU releases! [Ed: Much respect to Amin Bandali for stepping up and helping the FSF a lot when it needed it the most]
  • Spring "Bulletin": Verifying licenses, free software in education, and more!

    Software freedom needs our advocacy, our words and voices, and our generosity to spread. The biannual Free Software Foundation Bulletin is an item made for sharing, its articles from FSF staff and community members help facilitate the conversation about the importance of free software in daily life. It is a great tool to help people find their reason to support free software, to contribute to free software, or -- for the many who are just learning about it -- to take their next steps up the ladder to freedom.

pgAdmin 4 v6.11 Released

The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 6.11. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 20 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes. pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website. Read more Also: PostgreSQL: Announcing the release of AgensGraph 2.12

today's leftovers

  • The Month in WordPress – June 2022 – WordPress News

    With WordPress 6.1 already in the works, a lot of updates happened during June. Here’s a summary to catch up on the ones you may have missed.

  • Join the LibreOffice Team as a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d), 10-20h per week, remote

    To provide high quality tools for our contributors, together working on office productivity for over 200 million users around the globe, we are searching for a Web Technology Engineer (m/f/d) to start work as soon as possible.

  • Unravelling complexity in a software-defined vehicles industry | Ubuntu

    Vehicles are becoming more connected, autonomous, shared and electric (the famous CASE acronym). While customers expect new features and upgradability, the software and hardware components enabling such innovations require a different system architecture to function. This is a major change for the automotive industry as it requires new software skills, methodologies and business models. At the same time, automotive manufacturers need to adhere to complex and strict industry standards, and uphold safety-critical functions. In this post, we will focus on the different challenges the industry is facing in terms of hardware and software complexity, cybersecurity and safety. We will also discuss how Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) can learn from software companies to survive this transition towards software-defined vehicles and succeed. [...] On top of this, regulations are becoming very strict, forcing OEMs to provide patches and fixes to common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVE). Taking into account the previously detailed system complexity, it is becoming increasingly necessary to move towards a software-defined holistic context. Only a software-defined approach can provide the required flexibility and scalability that allows companies to comply with regulatory requirements while providing UX updates and handling hardware complexity. Of course, cybersecurity never only relies on software. Hardware vulnerabilities can also occur and usually lead to even worse consequences. Some hardware issues can be patched via software, but usually these CVEs remain valid throughout the system’s lifetime. For example, Meltdown and Spectre, two of the most widespread hardware vulnerabilities in the world, are still present and affecting tons of devices. This means that during hardware conception, cybersecurity must be taken into account in the specifications and system architecture in order to limit these vulnerabilities.